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Technology Shanya Robinson-Owens: This teen was offered over $1 million in scholarships when she applied to colleges

15:16  06 march  2021
15:16  06 march  2021 Source:   cnn.com

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After applying to more than 20 colleges, one high school senior from Philadelphia has been offered a total of over $1 million in scholarship money.

a close up of a person holding an umbrella: Shanya Robinson-Owens, who has been offered over $1 million in scholarship awards, has yet to decide which college she will attend © Courtesy Shanya Robinson-Owens Shanya Robinson-Owens, who has been offered over $1 million in scholarship awards, has yet to decide which college she will attend

Shanya Robinson-Owens, 17, applied to somewhere between 25 to 30 different colleges, hoping to find the school best suited for her. As her acceptance letters came rolling in, her family quickly realized she was being offered just over $1 million in scholarship money.

The senior at the George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science didn't have many expectations when applying to colleges and was shocked to discover just how much money she had been offered.

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"I didn't expect to get this, I knew about the scholarships, but I didn't expect it to be this much, at all," she said.

As Robinson-Owens began her application process, her family began counting all her scholarship packages. They created the hashtag #KeepingUpWithNya to track her progress on social media.

The high schooler is still in the process of touring college campuses and hasn't made any decisions on where she'll end up. She told CNN that she wants to evaluate her options carefully, not simply pick the school that offers her the most handsome scholarship package.

"I don't want to base it off money and then I don't like the school and not finish," said Robinson-Owens.

Among the colleges that have made offers are Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, La Salle University in Philadelphia, Temple University in Philadelphia, Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri and Cabrini University in Radnor, Pennsylvania.

Once she makes her final decision, Robinson-Owens hopes to study psychology, as some of her favorite subjects in school have been chemistry and physics. The high schooler also enjoys journalism, she's contributed to her school's news website and podcast. She's also a part of her school's yearbook committee.

Robinson-Owens will be graduating from high school in June and will start her college career in the fall.

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usr: 25
This is interesting!