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Technology Apple's privacy battle with Facebook just became all-out war

00:05  27 april  2021
00:05  27 april  2021 Source:   cnet.com

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Apple and Facebook have been tangled in a fight over Apple ' s new privacy updates since the summer. Tuesday's update is only the first half of big changes — the second part is due to roll out early 2021, and will actively ask users to opt in to being tracked for advertising. This feature was originally supposed to launch in September, but was delayed after developers including Facebook said it would gut their ad revenue. The two tech giants have attacked each other ferociously over the feature. In a November letter to privacy -focused nonprofit groups, Apple accused Facebook of hoovering up as

Today, Apple announced plans to finally roll out its previously delayed change in policy on apps' use of IDFA (ID for Advertisers) to track users for targeted advertising. The feature will be in the next beta release of iOS 14 (the company just rolled out the public release of iOS 14.4 this week) and will reach all iOS A new report in The Information today further fleshes out Facebook 's potential strategy. The Information's sources say that Facebook has been working for several months to build a legal case challenging Apple ' s control of its App Store and that it has also assisted the US Department of Justice

Apple and Facebook may be two of tech's biggest companies, but on the surface they seem very different. Apple rang up most of its $274.5 billion in sales last year pushing iPhones, iPads, Mac computers and AirPods headphones. Facebook, meanwhile, sells few devices, and instead made nearly all its $85.9 billion from targeted online advertising.

a screen shot of a computer: Apple and Facebook's relationship status has gone way beyond © Provided by CNET Apple and Facebook's relationship status has gone way beyond "it's complicated." James Martin/CNET

But there is one area where they cross paths, and now are crossing swords: the privacy of the people who use their products. And it's led to bitter words between their top execs.

Apple gave iPhone developers a stark warning about trying to secretly track users

  Apple gave iPhone developers a stark warning about trying to secretly track users Last year, Apple announced new privacy features that would eventually roll out in iOS 14. One of them arrived in late 2020, the app privacy labels that tell users which sort of personal data an app can collect. The feature doesn’t block developers from collecting data, it just forces them to disclose to their customers the kind of data their apps collect. Facebook reacted vehemently in December, taking out ads that painted Apple as a company that was working against small businesses and, thus, endangering the internet. The second privacy feature that Apple announced is called app tracking transparency (ATT), and it’s even more serious.

Facebook has become increasingly worried about Apple ’ s upcoming privacy measures. Last week during an earnings call, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg criticized Apple ’ s recent privacy claims, suggesting that the FB-owned WhatsApp offers better user protection than Apple ’ s iMessage. Meanwhile, Facebook is planning an antitrust lawsuit and taking out full-page newspaper ads claiming “the small business advertiser stands to see a cut of over 60% in their sales for every dollar they spend” if Apple ’ s privacy policies continue (Harvard Business Review adamantly disputes this number).

By Yahoo News - Apple (AAPL) and Facebook (FB) have one of the fiercest business rivalries in the world, and the tech giants just launched dual scorched earth campaigns that could hurt both companies’ businesses. The tech titans have been at each other’ s throats for years, with Apple CEO Tim Cook saying Facebook deprives people of the human right to privacy , and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg claiming Cook’ s comments on the company don’t align with the truth. Apple — which has been pushing its privacy capabilities as a major feature — has even taken steps to limit Facebook ’ s

On Monday, Apple released an update for its iPhones and iPads that strikes deep at the advertising world. The new operating software, with the relatively benign names iOS 14.5 and iPadOS 14.5, requires that app developers explicitly ask for permission to track users' behavior across the Apple's App Store and internet. That strikes deep at Facebook's business, which has been built over the past decade on technology designed to do exactly that, whether its users know it or not.

a screen shot of a computer: Apple and Facebook's relationship status has gone way beyond © James Martin/CNET

Apple and Facebook's relationship status has gone way beyond "it's complicated."

What may have started as a policy disagreement has turned into one of Silicon Valley's biggest feuds, with Apple CEO Tim Cook declaring that privacy should be a human right, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg saying that Apple's demand will hurt small businesses and raise costs across the internet.

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You want the absolute latest, greatest info on Apple — M1 Macs, iPhone 12 and iPhone 13, iPad and Mini LED iPad Pro, Apple Watch and Apple Glasses, AirPods and HomePods, and all the software and services that come with them. Facebook has just taken out not one but two, full-page newspaper ads, trashing Apple for the new iOS 14 prompt that forces apps to ask permission before they can track you across other apps and the web, calling it an all - out assault on small businesses and the free internet.

The Apple versus Facebook battle escalated quickly this week! The two companies had been on opposite sides for some time when it came to ad-tracking, but Facebook dramatically upped the ante when it ran full-page newspaper ads attacking Apple – with more reportedly planned. While Apple is in theory just offering a choice, the reality is that it is effectively leading people to choose no. Apple ’ s wording is misleading because the tracking system in question – IDFA, or IDentifier For Advertisers – was designed by Apple , and it very specifically prevents the tracking of identifiable individuals.

"Every business starts with an idea, and being able to share that idea through personalized ads is a game changer for small businesses," Facebook said in a blog post in February. "Limiting the use of personalized ads would take away a vital growth engine for businesses."

Mark Zuckerberg wearing a suit and tie: Mark Zuckerberg has had to answer for Facebook's actions on Capitol Hill. Sarah Tew/CNET © Provided by CNET Mark Zuckerberg has had to answer for Facebook's actions on Capitol Hill. Sarah Tew/CNET

Cook dismissed those concerns in an interview with The New York Times earlier this month. "We know these things are flimsy arguments," Cook said. "I think that you can do digital advertising and make money from digital advertising without tracking people when they don't know they're being tracked."

Apple and Facebook continued their sniping on Monday. Facebook shared a copy of the alert it'll tell users Apple "requires" as part of its new privacy push, while Apple released a video on YouTube saying it's fighting against "apps that have trackers embedded in them that take more data than they need."

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  Apple's next all-virtual launch will be April 20: Upgraded iPads, iOS 14.5 privacy push on tap Apple is expected to upgrade the screens of its iPads with a Pro-inspired design. Rumored AirTags may show up too.The new devices will be shown off during a stream on Apple's website. The tech giant has been holding online-only events amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has spurred waves of lockdowns around the world.

Apple is set to roll out new privacy controls in its iOS 14.5 update on Monday. With the update a notification will appear on iPhone apps asking users if they consent to being tracked 'across apps and websites owned by other companies'. Such tracking allows apps, like Facebook , publishers and Facebook 's Mark Zuckerberg and others say Apple ' s moves are self-serving and will help cement its dominance in the mobile space. But Apple says the update is necessary to give users back power over their data. Some mobile advertising analysts believe that fewer than one in three users are likely to

Apple is baking privacy into its systems. Its browser Safari already blocks third-party cookies by default, and last year Apple forced app providers in iOS to spell out in the App Store listings what data they collect. In recent years, governments and regulators have become increasingly concerned about just how big and complex the ecosystem around websites, apps and social media companies has become . Here are some points to consider: the average app includes six third-party trackers that are there solely to collect and share your online data, according to a report commissioned by Apple .

Their war of words marks a new low between two of the world's largest companies. Over the years, Apple's moved to sell itself as a beacon of privacy in a surveillance-rich world. The company regularly highlights how it builds security and the choice of anonymity into its products. Its newest AirTag tracking devices, announced last week, rely on encrypted communication, designed to ensure even Apple can't use its products to identify where people or their devices are.

Apple's approach has butted heads with Zuck & Co., whose comparatively loose approach to user data has led to government investigations and fines over massive privacy scandals.

Apple and Facebook haven't just argued over philosophy. Apple publicly criticized Facebook in its presentations in 2018, for example, showing off a new Screen Time feature, revealing how often people use various apps. In the demo, Facebook was shown as the ultimate time suck. Apple also announced new features for its Safari browser, saying it would be "shutting down" user tracking through Facebook's ubiquitous Like buttons around the web. This all came shortly after Facebook's Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal exploded into public view.

After Virginia passes new privacy law, states race to catch up to CCPA and GDPR

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Behind the scenes, Cook appears to have been unable to forge the relationship Apple co-founder Steve Jobs had with Zuckerberg more than a decade ago. Back then, the two tech titans were known to have broken bread and taken walks.

"I once asked Jobs who [he] admired in [Silicon] Valley," Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson told The Washington Post in 2012. "Mark's was the first name on his lips."

graphical user interface, application: How Facebook's responding to iOS 14.5 in its iPhone and iPad apps. Facebook © Provided by CNET How Facebook's responding to iOS 14.5 in its iPhone and iPad apps. Facebook

Cook, meanwhile, has had a reportedly more tense relationship with the Facebook head. During a meeting in 2019, Zuckerberg asked Cook for advice over how to handle the Cambridge Analytica scandal, during which the private data of more than 50 million Facebook users was leaked to a voter profiling firm connected to Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

"Cook responded acidly that Facebook should delete any information that it had collected about people outside its core apps," The New York Times reported Monday. "By urging Facebook to stop gathering that information, Cook was in effect telling Zuckerberg that his business was untenable. He ignored Cook's advice."

Fact check: A viral image of restaurant diners does not depict the Facebook content policy team .
A post falsely claims to show the Facebook team that sets the platform's rules. The image has been shared many times claiming to show various groups.“Facebook community standards team,” it claims. “This is literally who bans us.

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