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Technology ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system goes live in Washington state — here’s how it works

20:55  04 may  2021
20:55  04 may  2021 Source:   geekwire.com

USGS earthquake warning system expands to cover entire West Coast

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The news: ShakeAlert, an automated system designed to warn people that an earthquake has occurred and shaking is imminent, is being activated in Washington state today to complete a West Coast rollout of the technology.

a man riding a skateboard up the side of a ramp: A team from the UW-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network installs a new solar panel array at a seismic monitoring site in Enumclaw, Wash., in April. The seismometer, one of hundreds that provide data for ShakeAlert, is in the hole in the foreground. A trench brings cables to the newly installed solar panels, on the right, that power the system, and an aluminum box containing electronics that digitize and transmit the seismic data. (University of Washington Photo) © Provided by Geekwire A team from the UW-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network installs a new solar panel array at a seismic monitoring site in Enumclaw, Wash., in April. The seismometer, one of hundreds that provide data for ShakeAlert, is in the hole in the foreground. A trench brings cables to the newly installed solar panels, on the right, that power the system, and an aluminum box containing electronics that digitize and transmit the seismic data. (University of Washington Photo) graphical user interface: A ShakeAlert warning on a smartphone. © Provided by Geekwire A ShakeAlert warning on a smartphone.

How it works: The alert system, operated by the U.S Geological Survey in cooperation with the University of Washington-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, does not predict earthquakes before they happen, but is designed to rapidly detect ones that have already begun. Ground motion sensors near the earthquake feel the ground shaking and relay that information to a data processing center. The precise location of the quake is determined and ShakeAlert algorithms quickly estimate the strength and areas that will likely feel shaking.

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What you’ll see: People connected to the Wireless Emergency Alert system (the same system that produces AMBER alerts), will now get earthquake alerts for events of magnitude 5 or greater, using a similar interface, the UW reported. The smartphone alert will advise people to drop, cover and hold. Warning times range from a few seconds to tens of seconds depending on your distance to the epicenter.

Android phone users will get an alert built into the phone’s operating system. There is no downloadable app, but you can learn more about how to get alerts here.

Where else is it used?: ShakeAlert, which is similar to existing early warning systems in Mexico and Japan, began sending alerts in California in 2019 and in Oregon in March 2021.

diagram, schematic: (Click to enlarge) © Provided by Geekwire (Click to enlarge)

Big threat: Washington state has the second largest earthquake risk, behind California, of all 50 states. With Washington now online, the system will issue warnings to millions more people at risk from the largest possible earthquake in the lower 48 states — a rupture of the offshore Cascadia Subduction Zone. The 700-mile fault runs from California’s Cape Mendocino to the tip of Canada’s Vancouver Island.

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Other uses for system: The USGS partners with agencies to turn the information into public alerts, such as through notifications in smartphone apps and announcements on PA systems. Other technical partners can use the ShakeAlert data to take automated action such as:

  • Slowing trains to prevent derailment.
  • Stopping elevators at the nearest floor and opening their doors.
  • Opening firehouse doors so they are not stuck shut.
  • Throttling water utility valves to prevent emptying of reservoirs.
  • Activating backup generators at hospitals to ensure continued service.

More work to do: The sensor network is only about 65% complete for Washington state, with about 230 seismic stations. Oregon has some 155 stations providing data. The USGS and state and university partners will be adding more seismometers to the network through late 2025 to further enhance the system’s capability.

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