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Technology How AI could radically change education and standardized testing

00:00  11 june  2021
00:00  11 june  2021 Source:   techrepublic.com

NHL's COVID protocol-related absences for April 17, 2021

  NHL's COVID protocol-related absences for April 17, 2021 Players in the protocol are: Colorado's Bowen Byram, Philipp Grubauer and Joonas Donskoi; Edmonton's Dmitry Kulikov; Los Angeles' Matt Roy; Montreal's Jon Merrill and Erik Gustafsson; Philadelphia's Jackson Cates; Toronto's Nick Foligno, Riley Nash and Ben Hutton; and Vancouver's Nate Schmidt and Jake Virtanen. Read more here.APRIL 15The NHL has confirmed that the Vancouver Canucks will not return to play from their lengthy COVID-19 pause Friday night versus the Edmonton Oilers as originally hoped.

Changing Technology, Changing Marketplace. A totally wired future might be closer than we could even imagine, but we don’t need to look too far afield to see the impact of technology, including AI , in our daily lives, classrooms and workplaces. As more and more industries continue to automate, the very nature of work is beginning to change . More front-line jobs are being replaced with automated workers, but the need for more advanced thinking around how to manage and synthesize AI in the workplace is also growing. To best equip tomorrow’s leaders, we must provide students with technologically rich

Changing Technology, Changing Marketplace. A totally wired future might be closer than we could even imagine, but we don't need to look too far afield to see the impact of technology, including AI , in our daily lives, classrooms and workplaces. As more and more industries continue to automate, the very nature of work is beginning to change . More front-line jobs are being replaced with automated workers, but the need for more advanced thinking around how to manage and synthesize AI in the workplace is also growing. To best equip tomorrow's leaders, we must provide students with technologically rich

One silver lining of COVID-19 is that it exposed failed legacy systems and processes, forcing organizations to digitally transform. One area that has benefited is education. There is a quiet revolution underway that is challenging assumptions we have held for more than a century. The success of so many EdTech companies over the past year shows us new ways to better address old challenges. Artificial intelligence, for example, is sometimes cast as a villain in education, displacing teachers. However, what seems to be happening instead is that AI is being used to free up teacher time to improve how they engage students.

NHL's COVID protocol-related absences for May 7, 2021

  NHL's COVID protocol-related absences for May 7, 2021 Players in the COVID protocol are: Colorado's Devan Dubnyk and Washington's Evgeny Kuznetsov.Anaheim – TBA

Opinion: Sure, an AI aced an eighth-grade science test , but the method it used highlights its lack of common sense or anything resembling human understanding. Artificial intelligence researchers have long dreamed of building a computer as knowledgeable and communicative as the one in Star Trek, which could interact with humans in natural (i.e., human) language. Last week, we seemed to boldly go toward that ideal. The New York Times reported that a team at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence ( AI 2) had achieved “an artificial-intelligence milestone.”

AI can drive efficiency, personalization and streamline admin tasks to allow teachers the time and freedom to provide understanding and adaptability—uniquely human capabilities where machines would struggle. By leveraging the best attributes of machines and teachers, the vision for AI in education is one where they work together for the best outcome for students. An educator spends a tremendous amount of time grading homework and tests . AI can step in and make quick work out of these tasks while at the same time offering recommendations for how to close the gaps in learning.

a woman sitting at a table: Image: iStock/maksymbelchenko © Provided by TechRepublic Image: iStock/maksymbelchenko   How AI could radically change education and standardized testing © Image: iStock/maksymbelchenko

Perhaps in no area of education is this better illustrated than testing.

SEE: Juggling remote work with kids' education is a mammoth task. Here's how employers can help (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

The AI will test you now

I've written before about how Riiid Labs applies AI to testing. Riiid recently raised $175 million from Softbank and is making waves. I connected with the Silicon Valley-based CEO of Riiid Labs, David Yi, to learn more about how AI can improve testing. Like getting rid of standardized tests, for starters.

"Nobody likes standardized tests, even though most of us agree that we need some sort of objective measure of education," Yi said. "But in the century since the practice was widely introduced to American schools, the standardized testing system has grown bloated and corrupt. People with money have long figured out how to game it."

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How can I become a better standardized test taker? As a teacher, what are your thoughts on standardized testing ? What is the relationship between common core standards and standardized tests ? Mark S. Smith. , Educationalist, technologist, and spiritual entertainer. If a different population started taking the test that might also make it less reliable. Otherwise, the test will be just as reliable. The extent to which we think what it measures is valid or useful might change , as goals for education change . A norm- standardized test is useful for comparing students, but less useful for determining if

Computer-based tests can also reduce the amount of time needed to score and report results, particularly if automated scoring technologies are used. And, critically, it is less expensive to administer and score computer-based tests than paper-based versions. The political battles over testing (and education more broadly) limited the advances in assessment that the leaders of the consortia envisioned in 2010. For example, concerns about testing time caused the PARCC states to move away from their initial bold vision of embedding the assessments into courses and distributing them

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One of the outcomes of the coronavirus pandemic has been a pause in testing at many schools, and a number of prestigious American universities dropped standardized tests altogether, such as the ACT, GMAT and SAT. Yi argued this is a good thing. He said AI can do much better than standardized tests.

"Within ten minutes of interaction with an AI system, we can predict with over 90% accuracy a student's standardized test score and know what she's weak at and what she's strong at," Yi said. "We can predict what questions she'll get wrong before she even tries to answer them. We can even predict when she is going to get tired and disengage."

As US schools resume testing, large numbers are opting out

  As US schools resume testing, large numbers are opting out Standardized tests are returning to the nation’s schools this spring, but millions of students will face shorter exams that carry lower stakes, and most families are being given the option to forgo testing entirely. © Provided by Associated Press Jay Wamsted, left, and his daughter, Kira, are photographed on Thursday, May 20, 2021 in Smyrna, Ga. Wamsted, who is an 8th grade math teacher, allowed his daughter to skip testing this year.

9. Data powered by AI can change how schools find, teach, and support students. Smart data gathering, powered by intelligent computer systems, is already making changes to how colleges interact with prospective and current students. From recruiting to helping students choose the best While major changes may still be a few decades in the future, the reality is that artificial intelligence has the potential to radically change just about everything we take for granted about education . Using AI systems, software, and support, students can learn from anywhere in the world at any time, and with

In the US, standardized tests could be considered discriminatory in some regions because they assume that the student is a first-language English speaker. Students who have special needs, learning disabilities, or have other challenges which are addressed by an Individualized Education Plan may also be at a disadvantage when taking a standardized test compared to those who do not have Like any system, it can be abused by those who are looking for shortcuts. That is why each key point must be carefully considered before implementing or making changes to a plan of standardized testing .

One application of AI could be to "pre-fail" students, similar to "pre-crime" in "Minority Report." But this isn't how Yi sees things going.

How AI can help students succeed

What people overlook in AI too often is that it can also personalize education at a granular, individual student level in a way that standardized textbooks, tests and teaching cannot. AI can optimize a learning plan for each student. That is a game changer.

"Suddenly, the assessment itself becomes formative," Yi said. "It's not just a conclusive, one-test value judgment of the student. It becomes a formative learning process, and we can micro assess her, with low stakes, multiple times throughout a school semester or school year. That's an exciting proposition, but we thought it would take a decade before people were ready to accept this kind of methodology. COVID-19 has accelerated everything. Because people haven't been able to gather at a physical location and everything's asynchronized, we're finding more people eager to adopt this mode of assessment."

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COVID testing’s value shrinks as vaccines beat back virus

  COVID testing’s value shrinks as vaccines beat back virus WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials’ new, more relaxed recommendations on masks have all but eclipsed another major change in guidance from the government: Fully vaccinated Americans can largely skip getting tested for the coronavirus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that most people who have received the full course of shots and have no COVID-19 symptoms don't need to be screened for the virus, even if exposed to someone infected.The change represents a new phase in the epidemic after nearly a year in which testing was the primary weapon against the virus.

If you have a system that a student's interacting with on a daily or weekly basis, and that system can predict students' scores at any point in time and can recommend the learning path they should follow for optimal results, it obviates the need for standardized testing, Yi argued. A standardized test is a snapshot that people cram to get ready for. They take the picture, and then there's no follow-up. But if you have a system that's continually evaluating the student, you don't need that snapshot. You know at any point in time where they are and what the likely outcome is.

What changes is the purpose or the intent behind the assessment. Instead of, "Hey, you learned it" or "You didn't learn it; you're a failure" or "You're great," AI helps teachers assess the student to help her learn better. In this way, it's not a value judgment about her in the way test scores can be. When you're micro assessing, you're saying, "Here's where you are. Here's what you're weak at. And here's what you need to improve." This approach has the potential to completely change how we approach education.

"If we, as a community, society, and nation agree that the learning process is valuable and that it says something about the student's final outcome, we should be able to replace that final summative test score with this formative assessment," Yi said. AI enables that.

NHL announces blank COVID protocol-related absences list

  NHL announces blank COVID protocol-related absences list The long-awaited day has finally arrived. When the NHL released it’s COVID Protocol Related Absences list on Monday evening, it contained no names. It is the first time since the list originally debuted at the start of the regular season that the contents has been empty. Granted, the list now only includes the 14 active playoff teams as opposed to all 31 clubs, but it still marks a major achievement in the league’s battle against the Coronavirus. © Sergei Belski-USA TODAY Sports Of course, the final step toward a league-wide clean bill of health actually came with the elimination of the St. Louis Blues on Sunday.

Disclosure: I work for AWS, but the views expressed herein are mine.

Also see

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  • How an award-winning AI-powered software is helping students with remote learning (TechRepublic)
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  • What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence (ZDNet)

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“Political polarization has damaged the standing of civics and history," said Paul Carrese, an Arizona State University professor.As Chris Tims, a high school teacher in Waterloo, Iowa, sees it, history education is about teaching students to synthesize diverse perspectives on the nation’s complicated past.

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