Technology: Do Android phones now need Face ID too? - PressFrom - US
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Technology Do Android phones now need Face ID too?

15:21  01 november  2017
15:21  01 november  2017 Source:   msn.com

Motorola reveals which phones will get Android Oreo

  Motorola reveals which phones will get Android Oreo Can't wait to get Google's shiny new mobile platform? If you have a Motorola, cross your fingers that you own one of its 10 devices getting the software update. Otherwise, you might have to switch phones to experience what Android Oreo can offer, which includes picture-in-picture multitasking and notification "dots" on your favorite apps. According to the Lenovo-owned phonemaker's upgrade portal, it's currently preparing Android Oreo updates for the Moto Z2 Force, Moto Z2 Play, Moto Z Force DROID, Moto Z, Moto Z Play, Moto G5, Moto G5 Plus and their premium counterparts, the Moto GS5 and the Moto GS5 Plus.

Next, Face ID requires more sophisticated tech than most gadget makers might care to fit into phones just now : Apple has a custom system involving Three separate components in the iPhone X’s notch make Face ID possible. You’ll also need a truly secure method (and the necessary hardware and

Bloggers have begun getting some hands-on time with the iPhone X ahead of its shipping date, and the word on the street is that it’s pretty bangin’.

a close up of a car: Three separate components in the iPhone X's notch make Face ID possible © Provided by The Next Web Three separate components in the iPhone X's notch make Face ID possible Bloggers have begun getting some hands-on time with the iPhone X ahead of its shipping date, and the word on the street is that it’s pretty bangin’. And while it’s playing catch-up with the introduction of a bezel-less screen, it’s trumping the entire universe of Android devices with its new Face ID feature, which unlocks your phone as soon as you look at your handset.

The feature uses a front-mounted depth camera to analyze more than 30,000 points on your face to identify you, while also being able to distinguish between your actual face and any likeness (such as a headshot), as well as recognize you even if you’ve got makeup on, grown a beard, or had a haircut. And it’s not just for unlocking your phone: you can also use Face ID to authenticate purchases with Apple Pay.

Android One comes to the US at last with the Moto X4

  Android One comes to the US at last with the Moto X4 When it first launched in June 2014, Android One was envisioned by Google as a way to bring the mobile platform with its latest updates and features to easily accessible budget phones in developing markets. The Moto X4 is the first Android One handset to become available on American soil – we heard that the program was set to launch there, back in January – and it’s designed to work with Google’s Project Fi MVNO network and wireless service. The device itself was unveiled at the IFA expo in Berlin last month with Motorola’s Android customizations and Amazon’s Alexa assistant in tow.

One reason Face ID can’t be easily copied by Android device makers is supply. Apple has cornered the market through various deals, ensuring A new report from Digitimes notes that Android devices makers are more interested in in-display fingerprint scanners rather than Face ID -like technology

In this video, I will show you how you can get the apple Face ID or face Unlock in any android phone /tablet without root. **Stay Connected with me

So does that mean Android device makers should follow suit in 2018? Chinese gadget firm Meizu is already on the case: the company is working with chip maker MediaTek to create ‘the best facial recognition technology on smartphones’, and plans to reveal it next year.

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It’s worth noting that Wired’s Steven Levy, who’s been using the iPhone X for a week now, pointed out that Face ID doesn’t yet work perfectly. That could be down to the fact that he hasn’t yet got completely used to how it works at various angles, and Apple might well improve on it in the future. But I’m not sure every Android-based brand needs this feature immediately.

For starters, Face ID isn’t significantly faster, or more secure than a fingerprint sensor. If it were a toss-up between which of these to develop, then we’d be having a different conversation – but fingerprint sensors already exist, can be implemented cheaply, and work as well as one can expect.

Android's 'instant' apps are now leaner and faster

  Android's 'instant' apps are now leaner and faster Right now, Google's instant Android apps don't quite live up to their billing. Google has to load support for every possible device, which can slow down access to the app and chew up valuable space. That shouldn't be an issue going forward. Google has updated its instant app programming kit to let developers give you configurations that only target specific device profiles based on the display, chip architecture and language. If you're using a low-resolution screen, an ARM processor and Chinese, for example, you won't get the data needed for a sharper display, Intel chips and other languages. Google reckons that this saves an average of 10 percent space, which should translate to faster-loading apps. Also, you stand a better chance of keeping that instant app data if you decide to install the full thing. Where you previously needed Android Oreo to preserve that content, it now applies to phones running Lollipop or newer. Developers will need to roll the new features into their Android titles, so don't expect to see improvements right away. With that said, the gap between instant and fully installed apps should be noticeably narrower, especially if you're using one of the vast majority of Android devices that doesn't yet have Oreo.

Android News blog dedicated to providing expert tips, news, reviews, Android Phones , Android Apps, Android Tablet, Rooting & Howtos. The 282nd Android Apps Weekly is live! This week we talk about Titanium Backup's Google Play problems, the upcoming Stardew Valley, YouTube shutting

Just starting out with Android development; have a Nexus 5 bought in Japan, but with English version of android (presumably shouldn't matter).

Next, Face ID requires more sophisticated tech than most gadget makers might care to fit into phones just now: Apple has a custom system involving three separate components working together to enable it: an infrared camera, a flood illuminator to aid the camera in the dark, and a dot projector to help map your facial features. These components are partially responsible for the problematic notch disrupting the front fascia on the iPhone X.

Three separate components in the iPhone X’s notch make Face ID possible

You’ll also need a truly secure method (and the necessary hardware and software) to store that facial recognition data. All that adds up to additional R&D, testing and manufacturing costs, as well as less space within the frame of a phone to house other components.

It’s interesting to see Meizu get in on the game, and it won’t be surprising to learn about premium brands like Samsung hopping on the bandwagon eventually (the company’s Galaxy S8 and S8+ already come with iris scanners for unlocking your phone). And Microsoft Surface, as well as other laptops, include Windows Hello for unlocking your portable computers. But it seems like Face ID isn’t really the most essential feature for improving our mobile experience, and brands’ efforts could be better spent on other things.

Android's 'instant' apps are now leaner and faster

  Android's 'instant' apps are now leaner and faster Right now, Google's instant Android apps don't quite live up to their billing. Also, you stand a better chance of keeping that instant app data if you decide to install the full thing. Where you previously needed Android Oreo to preserve that content, it now applies to phones running Lollipop or newer.

ID 4me is an internet service that enables its users to log in to many different internet services with one account. This is also known as "single sign on". Also, ID 4me does not belong to an enterprise. It is an open standard that is maintained by a nonprofit organization. Anyone who wants to can participate.

The iPhone X has a new unlocking mechanism called Face ID , which replaces the old Touch ID system since the phone no longer has a fingerprint sensor. Next, you'll need to find the Settings menu where you can adjust your phone 's lock screen options, but this varies depending on what flavor of Android

With bezel-less displays becoming the norm, internal space is at a premium: where are you going to stash that large screen, an accompanying battery and a dual-camera system? It’s difficult enough, Xiaomi told TNW, that it chose to skip the latter and opt to include a single rear camera module in its bezel-less Mi Mix 2 this year.

The truth is that nobody asked for Face ID. But it’s also worth noting that following customers’ demands isn’t the only way to advance technology, and it’s likely that the system will eventually become cheap and easily miniaturized so it can be added to premium and budget Android phones alike.

Right now, it feels like a nice-to-have feature that’s best reserved for flagship devices. I’d be happier to see Android brands work on improving the longevity, durability, and camera capabilities of their phones, and leaving room for a headphone jack instead. There might be a time when I’ll want Face ID on my phone, but until then, there’s plenty of other stuff to improve on.

a man and a woman looking at the camera © Provided by The Next Web

Google Assistant on phones now offers a choice of hotwords .
Google created a mild amount of confusion when it launched its Home speaker. You could say "hey, Google" to start a command with the living room device, but you still had to use the time-honored "OK, Google" on your Android phone. Needless to say, that could be confusing if you used both platforms. However, Google is finally sorting things out. Many Android phone users have reported that Assistant is asking them to reconfigure the voice modeling, and is giving them a choice between "hey, Google" or "OK, Google" afterward. You can embrace consistency across devices or stick to tradition, in other words.

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