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SportEx-coach of Yale women's soccer pleads guilty in admissions scandal

22:40  28 march  2019
22:40  28 march  2019 Source:   reuters.com

Yale soccer coach fired over involvement in bribery scheme reportedly asked students to write his academic papers

Yale soccer coach fired over involvement in bribery scheme reportedly asked students to write his academic papers More details have surfaced regarding misconduct by the school's ex-women's soccer coach

Ex-coach of Yale women's soccer pleads guilty in admissions scandal© Steven Senne Rudy Meredith, former Yale women's soccer coach, departs federal court in Boston on Thursday, March 28, 2019, where he pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

BOSTON, March 28 (Reuters) - The former head coach of women's soccer at Yale University admitted on Thursday that he accepted bribes to help parents get their children into the Ivy League school, becoming the third person to plead guilty in the U.S. college admissions scandal.

Rudolph "Rudy" Meredith, whose decision to cooperate helped investigators discover the mastermind of the wide-ranging scheme, pleaded guilty in federal court in Boston to conspiracy and wire fraud charges.

College admissions scheme: Racketeering suspects plead not guilty in court

College admissions scheme: Racketeering suspects plead not guilty in court A dozen college coaches, sports administrators and test administrators each pleaded not guilty to racketeering in federal court in Boston on Monday as part of the sprawling college admissions scandal. Gordon Ernst, Donna Heinel, Laura Janke, Ali Khosroshahin, Mikaela Sanford, Steven Masera, Martin Fox, Igor Dvorskiy, Lisa "Niki" Williams, William Ferguson, Jorge Salcedo and Jovan Vavic each pleaded not guilty to racketeering during their arraignments. Ernst, Khosroshahin, Janke, Vavic, Salcedo and Ferguson were college coaches. Heinel was the senior associate athletic director at USC.

He is among 50 people, including the actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman, charged with participating in the scheme, headed by college admissions counseling service operator Rick Singer.

Prosecutors said the consultant charged wealthy parents hefty sums and then used bribes and cheating to illegally secure admission for their children to universities including Yale, the University of Southern California and Georgetown University.

Some $25 million in bribes were paid to coaches including Meredith who helped Singer's clients secure spots for their children as fake athletic prospects, prosecutors said.

Singer also facilitated cheating on college entrance exams, prosecutors said. He pleaded guilty on March 12 to charges including racketeering conspiracy and is cooperating with investigators.

College admissions scandal: Key cooperating witnesses have signed plea agreements

College admissions scandal: Key cooperating witnesses have signed plea agreements Mark Riddell and Rudy Meredith, two of the main cooperating witnesses in the college admissions scandal, have signed plea agreements with prosecutors in exchange for lesser sentences, according to court documents. Riddell and Meredith represent the two prongs at the heart of the scheme: cheating on standardized tests and bribing college coaches to falsely classify an applicant as a recruited athlete, clearing a path to admission.

Prosecutors said Meredith agreed beginning in 2015 with Singer to accept bribes to designate applicants as recruits to the Yale women's soccer team regardless of their athletic abilities.

In one instance, prosecutors alleged that Meredith in 2017 accepted a $400,000 payment to designate the daughter of a Los Angeles-based financial advisor as a soccer recruit even though she did not play competitive soccer.

Singer sent Meredith a fabricated athletic "profile" for the student that claimed she was co-captain of a prominent California club soccer team, prosecutors said.

In total, Meredith received more than $860,000 from Singer, prosecutors said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Eric Rosen said in court the scheme was uncovered during an investigation into an unrelated "pump-and-dump" stock market scheme involving a California man, who told prosecutors he was engaged in a bribery scheme with Meredith.

The California man, father of a Yale applicant, was Morrie Tobin, who pleaded guilty on Feb. 27 to conspiracy and securities fraud charges, a person familiar with the matter said.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, after receiving the tip, secretly recorded a meeting in which Meredith sought $450,000 in exchange for designating Tobin's daughter as a soccer recruit, according the person and court records.

Rosen said investigators learned about Singer during that meeting. He said Meredith subsequently agreed to record phone calls with Singer, helping prosecutors build their case against him. (Reporting by Nate Raymond; Editing by Scott Malone and David Gregorio)

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Another parent in college admissions scam says he intends to plead guilty.
Gordon Caplan, a former partner of an international law firm who was been tied to the college admissions scandal, said Friday he plans to plead guilty for his role in the scam. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); "I take full and sole responsibility for my conduct and I am deeply ashamed of my behavior and my actions," Caplan said in a statement.

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