Sport: High school junior does what no MLB player has done before: Hit for home run cycle - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

SportHigh school junior does what no MLB player has done before: Hit for home run cycle

17:50  18 april  2019
17:50  18 april  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

Auburn point guard Jared Harper to leave school, enter draft

Auburn point guard Jared Harper to leave school, enter draft AUBURN, Ala. — Auburn point guard Jared Harper says he will leave school at the end of the spring semester to enter the NBA Draft.Harper helped lead the Tigers to their first Final Four appearance before a 63-62 loss to eventual national champion Virginia Saturday. He said Tuesday he plans to sign with an agent. The 5-foot-11 junior ranks fifth in Auburn history in career assists, including a school-record 231 last season while averaging 15.3 points a game. Auburn coach Bruce Pearl says Harper came to Auburn "on a promise that together we could help make Auburn basketball relevant.

In baseball , completing the cycle is the accomplishment of hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in the same game. Collecting the hits in that order is known as a "natural cycle "

In baseball , hitting for the cycle is the accomplishment of one batter hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in the same game. Collecting the hits in that order is known as a "natural cycle ".

High school junior does what no MLB player has done before: Hit for home run cycle© Provided by USA Today Sports Media Group LLC Major League Baseballs. A high school baseball player in Ohio has done what no one in Major League Baseball history has done before: hit for the home run cycle.

Taken alone, that Perrysburg High School junior Luke Borer hit four homers in a 22-14 win on Monday night puts him in elite company, tying him for the second-most in a single game in the state's high school history. But it's in the home runs themselves where Borer stands out.

He hit a solo homer in his first at-bat, added a three-run shot in his second and a two-run blast in his fourth at-bat. In his fifth at-bat, Borer hit a grand slam. In his sixth and last appearance, Borer popped out with the bases loaded, according to The Toledo Blade.

Police: Teen admits fatally shooting elderly couple he knew

Police: Teen admits fatally shooting elderly couple he knew Police say a 17-year-old has admitted that he fatally shot an elderly couple and was planning to cause harm at his high school in eastern Wisconsin. Police say officers found the bodies at the couple's home in Grand Chute Sunday morning. Officer Travis Waas says Alexander M. Kraus told police he knew the couple and that he killed them. He has not been charged but is being held on possible first-degree intentional homicide charges. Details of the school plan have not been released.

The Perrysburg High School junior hit for a home run cycle in a 22-14 win against league rival Anthony Wayne Yep would have walked after the second for sure. Todd Peterson could do that. He hits bombs.

Writers of Sporting News described hitting four home runs in a single Major League Baseball ( MLB ) game as "baseball's greatest single-game accomplishment".

Borer hadn't hit a home run in his high school career heading into the game — so he was due, it seems.

PITCHER ON UNWRITTEN RULES:MLB players couldn't survive other sports

"I still can’t believe I even hit one," said Borer, via The Blade. "It’s pretty surreal."

No player in MLB history has hit for the homer cycle, though several have come close in the recent past. Former Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez hit three homers in the first four innings of a game against the Angeles on April 26, 2005, but wouldn't add the solo shot he needed to complete the cycle. Reds second baseman Scooter Gennett hit four homers in a game on June 6, 2017, but missed on a three-run shot to complete the set.

The feat has been achieved on the college and minor-league levels, however. Florida State's Marshall McDougall took it a step further in the Seminoles' 26-2 win against Maryland on May 9, 1999, hitting six home runs in total — an NCAA record, as you might expect — and locking down the cycle with a grand slam in the eighth inning.

Wisconsin teen gunned down grandparents, planned to 'cause harm' at his high school: Police

Wisconsin teen gunned down grandparents, planned to 'cause harm' at his high school: Police The 17-year-old boy arrested Sunday at a Wisconsin home where two people were found dead may have planned to 'cause harm' at his high school.

Update: I did a little digging on Wikipedia: The closest a major league player has come to hitting for the home run cycle was on April 26, 2005 when Alex Rodriguez of the New York Yankees hit 3 home runs off Los Angeles Some players have hit 4 home runs in a game but never a home run cycle .

Hitting for the cycle is perhaps the coolest thing a hitter can do in baseball . It may not be the most impressive thing, but it could be the coolest. In fact, no one has hit a home run cycle in MLB history. That's why you may not even know what it is. Well, it's what happens when you hit a solo homer, a

In February, Arkansas softball player Danielle Gibson notched the cycle home run in a win against Southern Illinois-Edwardsville. (Gibson also did it in the game's first four innings.)

It's happened once in the minor leagues: Tyrone Horne did it on July 27, 1998, while playing for the Class AA Arkansas Travelers, a St. Louis Cardinals affiliate. The bat Horne used in that game was sent to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: High school junior does what no MLB player has done before: Hit for home run cycle

Related slideshow: Best of the 2019 MLB season (Provided by imagn)

High school junior does what no MLB player has done before: Hit for home run cycle

Read More

School administrator on leave after drawing on boy's head for violating dress code.
A junior high school administrator was placed on leave and could face disciplinary action for drawing on a student's head with a marker.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!