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SportOpinion: NFL teams don't care about domestic violence. Losing draft picks would change that.

01:35  01 may  2019
01:35  01 may  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

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But the Giants don ’ t care that Brown is an admitted wife-beater, not as long as he’s converted 11-of-12 field goal attempts this season. And NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, well, he is apparently more concerned with how players celebrate touchdowns than how violently they touch their significant others.

No, we don ’ t think abusers should be banned from the NFL and forever exiled to Kolyma for their crimes. No, there is nothing wrong with teams signing or It was up to him to convince NFL fans and media, at a time of unprecedented domestic - violence awareness, that the Seahawks were mindful.

Opinion: NFL teams don't care about domestic violence. Losing draft picks would change that.© Provided by USA Today Sports Media Group LLC

NFL teams just can’t help themselves.

On the very day prosecutors announced they were re-opening the investigation into child abuse allegations against Tyreek Hill, the Kansas City Chiefs introduced their new defensive end, Frank Clark, who was kicked off Michigan’s team his senior year after being arrested for beating up his girlfriend.

The Tennessee Titans used a first-round pick on Jeffery Simmons, who in 2016 was caught on videotape repeatedly punching a woman who had been fighting with his sister. The Oakland Raiders signed Tyler Roemer as an undrafted free agent even though Roemer was the subject of a Title IX investigation at San Diego State after a physical altercation with his then-girlfriend and scouts have described him as “extremely immature,” according to his draft profile on NFL.com.

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Pushing for tough penalties on domestic violence would go a long way toward showing it's an important issue to the NFLPA. Given the current opinion of Goodell among players, removing The NFL may not yet think domestic violence is a cause worth openly discussing, but earlier this year

Aside from October, when they want to peddle their pink jerseys and T-shirts, or when they need a prop for a signing news conference, NFL owners view women as little more than rag dolls. Their health and safety is someone else’s concern, even when it’s one of their own players putting it in jeopardy.

And, really, why should the owners care? It’s not as if they’re made to pay a price for their callous disregard.

Even after the worst incidents of player brutality, the public shaming and outrage lasts for a few days, at most, and is rarely reflected in ticket sales or ratings. If it’s bad enough that a team is forced to cut a troubled player, some other player will step in and fill the void.

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Dwyer is the fourth NFL player recently arrested on domestic violence charges, with Ray Rice While NFL players get arrested at just a fraction of the overall rate, their arrests for domestic violence are And researchers know that those concussions can change a person. Even a pillar of the community.

There are 32 NFL teams in the league and 21 of those teams have players who have at some point in time faced domestic assault or sexual assault charges. That’s why I’m asking Roger Goodell to go further in his attempts to help his players, the league and the families affected by domestic violence

The cast-off players, meanwhile, become some other team’s bargain, their baggage just waiting to be repurposed into a redemption story.

It’s an ugly, yet predictable cycle, and it will continue unless the NFL intervenes.

In the nearly five years since Ray Rice, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has tried to make the league care about domestic violence. But the support programs, the suspensions, the experts with their long and impressive resumes -- they’re all just window dressing so long as owners believe the upside of a player with a troubled past outweighs any pain and embarrassment he might cause.

Losing draft picks would change that.

If a team signs someone with a history of domestic abuse or a pattern of violence, they’re on the hook for his future behavior. If he abuses again, the team loses two mid-round draft picks and the losses can’t be recouped through trades. Another incident results in the loss of a first-round pick, and the general manager who signed the offending player will be barred from participating in the draft and all preparations leading up to it.

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Domestic violence awareness organizations blasted the league . Mishandled cases from recent years flooded back into headlines. “The progress is that a great player on a great team was cut,” the person familiar with NFL operations said. “It’s not that they don ’ t care about domestic violence .

Teams tend to treasure draft picks like gold, and compensatory draft picks aren' t treated any differently. Teams are awarded compensatory draft picks between Rounds 3 and 7 based upon a formula, which is not released by the league , that takes into account a player's average salary per

And what if the GM has moved on, as John Dorsey of the Cleveland Browns did after signing both Hill and Kareem Hunt for Kansas City? The same penalties apply.

Harsh? Yes.

But necessary.

NFL teams are doing a disservice not only to the women they’re putting in harm’s way, but to the men who desperately need help. Domestic abuse and physical violence are usually learned behaviors, and the cycle cannot – will not – be broken without extensive therapy and continued support. Too often, NFL teams leave these players to fend for themselves, setting them up to fail.

The prospect of losing draft picks would not only force teams to make better choices about the men they bring into their organizations, it would compel them to ensure those players are getting the resources they need so they aren't a threat to their families or anyone else.

“I think on every player you bring into the organization there’s some element of risk,” Chiefs CEO and chairman Clark Hunt said Saturday. “… It’s something that as a franchise we have to be willing to own when it doesn’t go the right way.”

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Third, we will ensure that the NFL LifeLine and NFL Total Wellness Program are staffed with personnel trained to provide prompt and confidential assistance to All NFL Personnel will participate in new and enhanced educational programs on domestic violence and sexual assault. We will also increase our

A lot has changed since our last mock draft . And we're throwing a major curveball at No. 2 with the His first draft pick with the team will be highly scrutinized, and there are big needs elsewhere too That might allow the Raiders to recoup the second-rounder they lost in the Khalil Mack trade and not

They aren't, though. And they won't until the NFL steps in.

Follow USA TODAY Sports columnist Nancy Armour on Twitter @nrarmour.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Opinion: NFL teams don't care about domestic violence. Losing draft picks would change that.

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Opinion: NFL teams don't care about domestic violence. Losing draft picks would change that.

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