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SportSo what kind of baseball does Rob Manfred want?

08:35  12 july  2019
08:35  12 july  2019 Source:   sports.yahoo.com

MLB commissioner again shoots down juiced ball theories

MLB commissioner again shoots down juiced ball theories The topic of Major League Baseball being largely responsible for the record home run pace we have seen in 2019 came up again at the All-Star Game on Tuesday, and commissioner Rob Manfred doubled-down on his denial. 

Baseball giveth, and baseball taketh away. In these perilous times when every little moment is a This brings us back to the one skill a commissioner should possess and which Manfred doesn’t It’s as if everyone wants to disparage the future of the game while forgetting why the present is worthwhile.

While commissioner Rob Manfred denies any intentional manipulation of the baseballs , he says the league is considering changes to the ball's specifications. MLB commissioner Rob Manfred insists league isn't juicing the balls – so where do we go from here?

So what kind of baseball does Rob Manfred want?© Provided by Oath Inc. Commissioner Rob Manfred watches as the American League players warm-up for the MLB baseball All-Star Game, Tuesday, July 9, 2019, in Cleveland. (AP) Let’s set aside for a moment the issue of whether or not the commissioner’s office ordered Rawlings, which MLB purchased a year ago, to alter the production of the baseball such that it would be more aerodynamic. Or put another way, whether MLB juiced the balls on purpose.

Commissioner Rob Manfred continued to deny as much this week at the Baseball Writers’ Association of America meeting in Cleveland, which is not surprising. How we got here matters (as does the possibility that Manfred has been lying on the record for months) but regardless of whether what has happened thus far was intentional, what happens next will have to be. And that decision will tell us more about how the league feels about all these home runs than anything anyone has said on the subject.

Justin Verlander got ‘chewed out’ by MLB before All-Star Game

Justin Verlander got ‘chewed out’ by MLB before All-Star Game Justin Verlander made headlines earlier in the week when he openly accused Major League Baseball of lying about juicing balls, and he had to have known league officials would not appreciate the remarks. What he may not have known, however, was that he would be scolded over them. As Jayson Stark of The Athletic put it, Verlander got called into the principal’s office on Monday afternoon. The veteran right-hander received a stern talking to from Joe Torre, Jim Leyland and at least one other MLB official.

Commissioner Rob Manfred adamantly insists they are the same baseballs . They have not been intentionally doctored. The only difference is the drag of But much quicker, and realistic, we could find out just what kind of game everyone wants baseball to become. Manfred still wants quicker and

They want games to be shorter in the terms of not having so much wasted time. The rule on the limit on mound visits was a reaction to Gary Sanchez making so many visits to the The problem is that baseball keeps getting more competitive. What kind of MLB commissioner will Rob Manfred be?

We’ve reached a pivotal plateau in conversation around the unprecedented home run pace: everyone with a stake in the game seems to understand that the balls are to blame. Production has changed (passive voice to ensure unanimity) and now we have a ball that is able to travel further with the same amount of force. There are other more “organic” factors to explain why home runs are up from 50 years ago — stronger pitchers, steeper launch angles — but the reason home runs have spiked since last year, or even 2017 which was the previous high-water mark — that’s the ball.

So just put it back, right?

To what, though? The 2018 ball? The 2016 ball? We don’t have detailed analysis of the 1930 ball, but it seems hard to imagine that it was more similar to any of those than they are to each other. Retroactive speculation on the comparative composition of the baseball from seasons past is a whole other article for someone more familiar with the scientific analysis that has been so revelatory lately. But the point remains that there is no platonic ideal of a baseball — and, in fact, if what Manfred has said is to be believed, the version we have now is likely the closest we’ve gotten to perfection — and that a return to an earlier-style baseball reflects an active choice that’s indicative of a home run value judgment.

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred insists league isn't juicing the balls – so where do we go from here?

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred insists league isn't juicing the balls – so where do we go from here? While commissioner Rob Manfred denies any intentional manipulation of the baseballs, he says the league is considering changes to the ball's specifications. "Topic under discussion," Manfred said. "Can go no further." He was more effusive in rebuffing Verlander. "If we make a decision to change the baseball," he insisted, "you’re going to know about it before we change the baseball.

Commissioner Rob Manfred denied that Major League Baseball has juiced baseballs to create more home runs and offense following criticism from " Baseball has done nothing, given no direction for an alteration in the baseball ," Manfred said. "The flaw in logic is that baseball wants more home runs.

Commissioner Rob Manfred : [Chuckling] No. We had a nice 2016 but we think the momentum we built last year can carry over into '17. So what does that involve? RM: Biggest picture: We've got three kinds of changes that we make in the rules. The first are the dead-time changes. Manfred (here with White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf) said he wants to hear opposing viewpoints before

This newfound awareness of the physics of baseballs is not a blip that can be easily undone. We’re through the looking glass and across the Rubicon on needing to know just how juicy a particular season’s balls are. Now that we can track with pinpoint precision the impact that the ball’s manufacturing has on the on-field product, the conversation is only beginning.

“We think we have a good handle on what's going on in the manufacturing process as a result of the audit that's been done,” Manfred said Tuesday. “I think our focus going forward is to develop an ability through universities, academics scientists, to measure in advance how the ball is going to perform, to check it before it goes out there so that we don't have to wait until May and say, ‘Gee home runs up, what's going on?’ Just to get a better feel and more consistency on how it's going to perform.”

What he is saying is that although you should not hold him accountable for the variability of the ball in the past, going forward MLB will have the level of quality control necessary to sign off on exactly how the ball flies each season. No mysteries, no excuses.

Justin Verlander: MLB juicing balls, 'turning this game into a joke'

Justin Verlander: MLB juicing balls, 'turning this game into a joke' Balls are leaving MLB parks at a record clip in 2019. Houston Astros All-Star Justin Verlander has no doubt that juiced balls are causing the boom. One day before he’ll start for the American League in the All-Star Game, Verlander vented a lot of frustration about the balls and MLB commissioner, Rob Manfred. “It’s a f—ing joke,” Verlander said, per Jeff Passan of ESPN. “Major League Baseball’s turning this game into a joke. They own Rawlings, and you’ve got Manfred up here saying it might be the way they center the pill. They own the f—ing company.

Rob Manfred puts Mike Trout's lack of popularity on Mike Trout's shoulders. 1. Few would argue that Mike Trout is the best player in baseball . Unfortunatley, that's a problem for Major League Baseball because Trout's Q rating is pretty much non-existent.

Newly elected MLB commissioner Rob Manfred opens up in an exclusive interview with SI.com's Tom Verducci. On the day after he was elected the 10th commissioner of baseball last week, Rob Manfred was handed a stack of index cards and “What we did establish is one thing,” Manfred said.

Manfred has insisted the current iteration of the baseball falls within the existing parameters, and I don’t disbelieve him. On Tuesday, he indicated that the league is discussing tightening those specifications. What he didn’t say, however, is in which direction.

So what kind of baseball — by which I mean both the literal and synecdochical definition — does Rob Manfred want?

For years, stories about the home run rate have referenced Manfred’s inaugural promise to “inject additional offense into the game” as evidence that this uptick is, if not by design, at least welcome. Four years later, Manfred has changed his tune.

"The flaw in logic is that baseball wants more home runs,” he said. “If you sat in owners meetings and listen to people on how the game is played, that is not a sentiment among the owners for whom I work."

Of course, home runs and offense are not exactly the same (or at least they used to not be) and the increasing conflation of the two is part of what baseball purists dislike about the modern game. But among players, at least, there is a perception that if the league did alter the ball, it was to cater to some nebulous sense of what people want.

Carlos Correa has distinctly different take on ‘juiced balls’ than teammate Justin Verlander

Carlos Correa has distinctly different take on ‘juiced balls’ than teammate Justin Verlander Houston Astros teammates Justin Verlander and Carlos Correa don’t exactly see eye to eye on the whole “juiced balls” debate swirling around MLB these days. 

Rob Manfred can take care of this on his own. Rob Manfred must do something. AP (2). “… The flaw in that logic is that baseball somehow wants more home runs. If you sat in an owners’ meeting and listened to talk about the way our game is being played, that is not the sentiment among owners

Manfred : “We see London as kind of a gateway to Europe, and Europe is a really important growth opportunity for baseball . Manfred : “Yeah, I did . I think that because there is a significant economic opportunity in Europe. We already have a television deal with [BT Sport in the United Kingdom] and

“I think that’s what they thought fans wanted to see,” Jacob deGrom told the New York Times about all the record-setting home runs. “So if that was the case, I guess it’s not bad for the game.”

“I think that’s kind of what makes the game exciting,” his teammate Jeff McNeil told Yahoo Sports. “Bunch of action, I guess.”

“I think as a fan when you come to the game, you either wanna see a guy strike out a ton of guys or people hit a ton of home runs,” San Francisco Giants pitcher Will Smith said.

“Would you rather have the players juiced or the ball juiced?” Kansas City Royals second baseman Whit Merrifield reasoned. “People want offense.”

“How do they want more offense?” Washington Nationals ace Max Scherzer said. “I think fans love the action of the game. The athleticism that it takes to play the game. Making great defensive plays. What’s your top 10? You see great defensive plays, you see great hits, unbelievable running of the bases. I think that’s the most exciting part of our game is when the ball is in play.”

Personally, I agree with Scherzer. But what do I know? I’m just one person. The problem is, so are all the rest of the fans.

Baseball’s audience is not a homogenous, uniformly thinking unit. And the goal is only to make it bigger and more diverse.

Rob Manfred can’t make everyone in and around baseball happy, but he is going to have to do something about the baseball — even if it’s just commit to consistency with what we have now — and in doing so he’ll issue a referendum on all those home runs this year. Whether he wants to or not.

Major League Baseball still has a star problem and nobody wants to take the blame

Major League Baseball still has a star problem and nobody wants to take the blame For a second straight year, the MLB's All-Star Game sparked a discussion of brand power

Rob Manfred can take care of this on his own. He must take care of this, to be more precise. The Major League Baseball commissioner proved gracious enough to receive 37 questions (not including follow-ups) when meeting with the Baseball Writers Association of America on Tuesday afternoon at a hotel

MLB’s commissioner wants to modernize the league and that’s great. But he should focus on doing so behind the scenes and selling the sport in public.

Related Slideshow: Best of the 2019 MLB season (provided by imagn)

So what kind of baseball does Rob Manfred want?

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