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SportNCAA sends letter calling California likeness bill 'unconstitutional'

19:00  11 september  2019
19:00  11 september  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

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California Assembly passes bill that brings state to verge of rules showdown with NCAA . The California Assembly passed a bill that would allow college athletes to more easily make money off their own likeness beginning in 2023. Post to Facebook.

Lawmakers in California have launched the latest attack on NCAA amateurism rules, with a bill approved The bill would allow college athletes to sign the same types of endorsement deals and In line with the NCAA and the Pac-12 Conference, also in staunch opposition. In a letter to lawmakers

The NCAA responded to the California State Assembly's passage of a bill that would allow college athletes to more easily make money off their own name, image and likeness starting Jan. 1, 2023, by sending a letter to Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) on Wednesday that says if the bill becomes law, it "would result in (schools) being unable to compete in NCAA competitions" and would be "unconstitutional."

NCAA sends letter calling California likeness bill 'unconstitutional'© Provided by USA Today Sports Media Group LLC

Reference to the bill's legality signals the NCAA's potential willingness to sue California under the commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution, which says that only Congress has the power to regulate commerce among states.

LeBron James backs California bill to allow college athletes to earn endorsement income

LeBron James backs California bill to allow college athletes to earn endorsement income LeBron James has been an outspoken critic of the NCAA over the years, and the Los Angeles Lakers superstar unsurprisingly is backing a proposed bill in California that would allow athletes to earn income off the use of their likenesses. James took to social media on Thursday morning and in a series of tweets expressed his overwhelming support for Senate Bill 206, “The Fair Pay to Play Act,” calling the potential passing of it a “GAME CHANGER.” Everyone is California- call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206! This law is a GAME CHANGER. College athletes can responsibly get paid for what they do and the billions they create.

Everyone is California - call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206! According to USA Today, NCAA president Mark Emmert sent a letter to two state assembly committees that implied that California schools would be barred from participating in NCAA championships if the bill becomes law.

The NCAA doesnt want California to pass a bill that would allow players in the state to be compensated for their own names and likeness . My Music/Vlog

The letter is signed by every member of the NCAA Board of Governors, the association's top policy- and rules-making group.

"If the bill becomes law and California’s 58 NCAA schools are compelled to allow an unrestricted name, image and likeness scheme," the letter says, "it would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletics and, because it gives those schools an unfair recruiting advantage, would result in them eventually being unable to compete in NCAA competitions."

The bill cleared the State Assembly by a 73-0 margin after all tallies were counted. It is expected to pass a concurrence vote in the State Senate as early as Wednesday. The Senate had approved the bill by an overwhelming margin, but amendments made in the Assembly required its reconsideration by the Senate,

LeBron James wants college athletes to get paid. Will California pass a law to make it happen?

LeBron James wants college athletes to get paid. Will California pass a law to make it happen? King James is throwing his might behind a California bill that would pave the way for college athletes to get paid. NBA superstar LeBron James gave a major boost to a proposed law that would allow students to get paid for their name, image and likeness. James considers it a "GAME CHANGER." "College athletes can responsibly get paid for what they do and the billions they create," James

The California Assembly unanimously passed a bill Monday that would allow college athletes in the state to profit on their name, image and likeness . The bill is expected to pass again in the Senate, where it won approval 31-5 in its earlier version. Governor Gavin Newsom will then presumably sign it

A new proposed California bill on paying college athletes is discussed by FOX Business' 'Kennedy' panel, including comedian Jimmy Failla, 'The Fifth Column' In June, NCAA President Mark Emmert sent a letter to two state Assembly committee chairs urging lawmakers to postpone the legislation.

Newsom will have 30 days to sign or veto the bill. If he takes no action, the bill wouid become law. His office has not responded to an inquiry regarding his position on the bill.

"With more than 1,100 schools and nearly 500,000 student-athletes across the nation, the rules and policies of college sports must be established through the Association’s collaborative governance system," the letter reads. "A national model of collegiate sport requires mutually agreed upon rules. ...

"We urge the state of California to reconsider this harmful and, we believe, unconstitutional bill and hope the state will be a constructive partner in our efforts to develop a fair name, image and likeness approach for all 50 states."

With the bill set to not take effect for three years, it would give the NCAA the opportunity to make changes to its name, image and likeness rules that would satisfy California lawmakers.

California Assembly passes SB 206 that brings state to verge of rules showdown with NCAA

California Assembly passes SB 206 that brings state to verge of rules showdown with NCAA California State Assembly unanimously approved a bill that would give NCAA athletes in the state the right to profit off their likeness.

"Everyone is California - call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206! This law is a GAME CHANGER. College athletes can responsibly get Opponents, including the NCAA , had sent letters of opposition to the Legislature. One scenario they speak of is the inability for California 's schools to

The California state assembly voted in favor of a bill that could help NCAA athletes earn money off names, images or likenesses . NCAA President Mark Emmert wrote a letter to California lawmakers in June asking them for Everyone is California - call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206!

NCAA rules presently allow athletes to make money from their name, image or likeness, but only under a series of specific conditions, including that no reference can be made to their involvement in college sports.

However, an NCAA panel is studying potential changes to those rules. The panel is scheduled to make a final report to the association’s board of governors in October. The California legislative session ends Friday.

Contributing: Steve Berkowitz, USA TODAY Sports

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: NCAA sends letter calling California likeness bill 'unconstitutional'

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