Sport: California college athlete 'fair pay' bill goes to governor - PressFrom - US
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SportCalifornia college athlete 'fair pay' bill goes to governor

03:25  12 september  2019
03:25  12 september  2019 Source:   ap.org

California governor signs bill striking down law that made it a crime to refuse police officer's request for help

California governor signs bill striking down law that made it a crime to refuse police officer's request for help California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) signed a bill on Tuesday striking down a dated law that made it a crime to refuse a police officer's request for help. The law Newsom struck down Tuesday dated back to 1872 and made it a misdemeanor for any "able-bodied person 18 years of age or older" to refuse a police officer's call for assistance in making an arrest, according to The Sacramento Bee. The California Posse Comitatus Act of 1872 was used in the country's early days, notably as a means of enforcement to help catch runaway slaves. The bill Newsom signed into law is sponsored by state Sen.

The California assembly has passed legislation to let student athletes make money, setting up a confrontation with the college sports’ governing body. Student athletes would earn money from endorsements. Bill still needs to be approved by California ’s governor .

Should college athletes be allowed to make money off their name, their image, even their likeness? The answer is usually not cut and dry. The state of California , however, could be poised to make that decision for athletes , universities and the NCAA.The state Legislature passed the Fair Pay to Play

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Athletes at California colleges could hire agents and sign endorsement deals under a bill the state Legislature sent to the governor on Wednesday, setting up a potential confrontation with the NCAA that could jeopardize the athletic futures of powerhouse programs like USC, UCLA and Stanford.

California college athlete 'fair pay' bill goes to governor© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Sept. 31, 2019, file photo, Fresno State quarterback Jorge Reyna, left, looks to throw a pass as Southern California USC Trojans defensive lineman Christian Rector approaches during an NCAA college football game in Los Angeles. The NCAA’s Board of Governors is urging Gov. Gavin Newsom not to sign a California bill that would allow college athletes to receive money for their names, likenesses or images. In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. As a result, the letter says, the NCAA would declare those schools ineligible for its events. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong, File)

Gov. Gavin Newsom has not said whether he will sign it. But the NCAA Board Of Governors is already urging him not to, sending him a letter Wednesday saying the bill "would erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletics" and would have drastic consequences for California's colleges and universities.

LeBron James backs California bill to allow college athletes to earn endorsement income

LeBron James backs California bill to allow college athletes to earn endorsement income LeBron James has been an outspoken critic of the NCAA over the years, and the Los Angeles Lakers superstar unsurprisingly is backing a proposed bill in California that would allow athletes to earn income off the use of their likenesses. James took to social media on Thursday morning and in a series of tweets expressed his overwhelming support for Senate Bill 206, “The Fair Pay to Play Act,” calling the potential passing of it a “GAME CHANGER.” Everyone is California- call your politicians and tell them to support SB 206! This law is a GAME CHANGER. College athletes can responsibly get paid for what they do and the billions they create.

The bill , known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, passed the state Assembly 66-0 on Monday. The state Senate approved the measure 31-5 earlier this year In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. As a result, the letter says

The bill , known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, passed the state Assembly 66-0 on Monday. The state Senate approved the measure 31-5 earlier this year In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. As a result, the letter says

"Because it gives those schools an unfair recruiting advantage, (it) would result in them eventually being unable to compete in NCAA competitions," the letter said. "These outcomes are untenable and would negatively impact more than 24,000 California student-athletes across three divisions."

Newsom has 30 days to either sign the bill, veto it or let it become law without his signature.

The bill would allow student-athletes to hire agents and be paid for the use of their names, images or likenesses. It would stop California universities and the NCAA from banning athletes that take the money. If it becomes law, it would take effect Jan. 1, 2023.

"I'm sick of being leveraged by the NCAA on the backs of athletes who have the right to their own likeness and image, this is about fairness," Assemblywoman Sydney Kamlager-Dove, a Los Angeles Democrat, said Monday.

California governor signs bill limiting vaccine exemptions

California governor signs bill limiting vaccine exemptions The governor's amendments to the bill — delaying state reviews of certain medical exemptions and grandfathering in existing exemptions — were contained in a separate measure, which was also signed into law . In total six people were arrested on misdemeanor charges of resisting and delaying a peace officer, and intentionally obstructing business on public property. They were also demonstrating without a permit. Two of the arrests were for people who chained themselves to the entrances of the capitol. Protesters also blocked the entrance to Newsom's office, according to a capitol spokesperson.

Governor , Calls Athlete Compensation Bill 'Unconstitutional'. The California State Assembly passed the ' Fair Pay to Play Act' on Monday by a 73-0 margin. The bill would not force schools to pay athletes , but rather allow athletes to hire agents who can procure business and sponsorship deals.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The NCAA Board of Governors wants California Gov. Gavin Newsom to reject a new attempt to pay college athletes . And it is prepared to take the fight to court if necessary. In a six-paragraph letter released Wednesday

The Senate voted 39-0 to pass the bill, which has the endorsement of NBA superstar LeBron James, who skipped college and went directly to the NBA before the league changed its rules to require players to be at least one year removed from high school before entering the draft. But the bill could impact James' 14-year-old son, who is a closely watched basketball prospect in Los Angeles.

The NCAA is the governing body for college sports. But membership is voluntary. Athletes can get valuable scholarships, but the NCAA has long banned paying athletes to preserve the academic missions of colleges and universities. But college sports have since morphed into a multibillion-dollar industry, igniting a debate over the fairness of not paying the industry's most visible labor force.

Video by USA Today Sports

Tebow against bill supported by LeBron to pay college players

Tebow against bill supported by LeBron to pay college players Tim Tebow made it clear that he stands in opposition to to the California Fair Pay to Play act that LeBron James supports.

The bill , known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, passed the state Assembly 66-0 on Monday. The state Senate approved the measure 31-5 earlier this year but a revote is expected later In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage.

The Fair Pay to Play Act, which Skinner wrote with Steven Bradford, a fellow Democrat in the State But opponents of the California bill see it as crossing a critical line, professionalizing collegians. “I don’t imagine too many people are going to be willing to allow California schools to compete for

Earlier this year, NCAA President Mark Emmert told lawmakers that passing the bill would be premature, noting the NCAA has a committee — led by Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith and Big East Commissioner Val Ackerman — that is exploring the issue. Their report is due in October.

The NCAA committee has already said it won't endorse a plan to pay athletes as if they were employees, but they could ease limits on endorsement deals for athletes. The NCAA already lets athletes accept money in some instances. Tennis players can accept up to $10,000 in prize money and Olympians can accept winnings from their competitions.

The bill still puts some restrictions on athletes, such as forbidding them from signing endorsement deals that conflict with their school's existing contracts.

Republican Assemblyman Jim Patterson of Fresno was the only lawmaker to speak against the bill, though he did not cast a vote. He said allowing athletes to make money could make universities in rural areas less competitive because there could be fewer sponsorship opportunities in the area.

NCAA sends letter calling California likeness bill 'unconstitutional'

NCAA sends letter calling California likeness bill 'unconstitutional' The NCAA Board of Governors sent a letter to California Gov. Gavin Newsom that calls a bill giving student-athletes more power "unconstitutional."

Who would be paying California 's college athletes ? The bill does not suggest schools should be responsible for giving any more money to their athletes than they already do. Nor does it guarantee that every student- athlete would be able to make more.

INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA’s Board of Governors is urging Gov. Gavin Newsom not to sign a California bill that would allow college athletes to receive money for their names, likenesses or images. The bill , known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, passed the state Assembly 66-0 on Monday.

But other lawmakers argued banning college athletes from being paid was a violation of their freedoms.

"Playing college sports should not have to come at the cost of personal liberty, dignity, self-expression or any other value this legislature is charged with protecting," said Republican Assemblyman Kevin Kiley of Rocklin. "Let's send a loud and clear message to the NCAA."

But in and around California, schools and conferences believe this legislation might not be the best solution.

The Pac-12, which includes Southern California, UCLA, Stanford and Cal, issued a statement Wednesday reiterating its previous stance — asking the California Legislature to delay the debate until the NCAA announces formal proposals.

"We all want to protect and support our student-athletes, and the Pac-12 has played a leadership role in national reforms for student-athletes over the past years," the statement said. "The question is what's the best way to continue to support our student-athletes. We think having more information and informed views will be helpful."

J.D. Wicker, the athletic director at San Diego State, a Mountain West Conference member, agreed, saying "California weighing in on this complicates that."

"I think the frustration for me is that they probably don't truly understand the NCAA and how we work as a governing body," Wicker said. "Again, it's schools across 50 states and it's all of us working together, whereas the state of California will only harm California schools."

LeBron James wants college athletes to get paid. Will California pass a law to make it happen?

LeBron James wants college athletes to get paid. Will California pass a law to make it happen? King James is throwing his might behind a California bill that would pave the way for college athletes to get paid. NBA superstar LeBron James gave a major boost to a proposed law that would allow students to get paid for their name, image and likeness. James considers it a "GAME CHANGER." "College athletes can responsibly get paid for what they do and the billions they create," James

Bill to Pay NCAA Athletes ? Fair Pay to Play Act Explained. The California State Assembly passed a bill on Monday that will allow college athletes to be paid for the use of their name, likeness and image. The panel is set to share its findings to the NCAA's board of governors in October.

Jay Bilas joins OTL to discuss the California " Fair Pay to Play Act" bill , which would make it possible for college athletes to accept endorsement money. The board of governors ' letter said that California 's law -- if nothing changes nationally before it goes into effect in 2023 -- would result in

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AP Sports Writers Michael Marot in Indianapolis and Bernie Wilson in San Diego contributed to this report.

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Online:

NCAA statement: http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/media-center/news/ncaa-responds-california-senate-bill-206

California college athlete 'fair pay' bill goes to governor© Provided by The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2019, file photo, UCLA forward Cody Riley, right, grabs a rebound away from Southern California guard Kevin Porter Jr. during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles. The NCAA’s Board of Governors is urging Gov. Gavin Newsom not to sign a California bill that would allow college athletes to receive money for their names, likenesses or images. In a six-paragraph letter to Newsom, the board said the bill would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. As a result, the letter says, the NCAA would declare those schools ineligible for its events. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

College athlete accused in assault and battery on campus.
A Merrimack College hockey player was ordered to stay away from the school after being accused of assaulting a female student in his dorm room. August von Ungern-Sternberg, 22, of Idaho, was arrested by Merrimack College Police and subsequently arraigned Tuesday in Lawrence District Court on charges of assault and battery, witness intimidation and resisting arrest. According to a police report, von Ungern-Sternberg's roommate told police he found the alleged victim crying in their room, and that he walked her out of the room and stayed with her until other friends contacted police.

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