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Sport NHL, NHLPA still discussing league's participation in Olympics

20:01  27 october  2019
20:01  27 october  2019 Source:   prohockeyrumors.com

Will the Kings trade Jonathan Quick after his poor start to the season?

  Will the Kings trade Jonathan Quick after his poor start to the season? Through two starts, Quick is 0-2 and has allowed a shocking 14 goals on just 56 shots. His .750 save percentage, very bad in its own right, is more than 70 points lower than the next-worst save percentage, while his 7.17 goals-against average is one of only two in the league over 6.00 early on. When Quick is on his game, he has proved himself to be one of the top goaltenders in the NHL, but after a miserable 2018-19 campaign, he’s off to the wrong start if he wants to show that he can still be that guy. Quick’s early struggles have both local and national hockey pundits weighing in on his future.

As collective bargaining continues to progress between the NHL and NHLPA , one of the major issues still in discussions is the league ’ s participation The NHL notably sat out the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, as the owners’ complaints included the extended break in the

The League has participated in the Olympics five times and has never seen any objective evidence of a positive impact on the business or sport. These events are part of a larger international plan, and we'll see if something changes regarding NHL participation in the 2022 Beijing Olympics .

As collective bargaining continues to progress between the NHL and NHLPA, one of the major issues still in discussions is the league’s participation in the Olympics. The NHL notably sat out the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, as the owners’ complaints included the extended break in the league season, the injury risk to star players, and the lack of value in the locale. With the first two arguments unchanging and the next two Games being held in Beijing, China and Milan, Italy, it is unlikely that the NHL Board has changed their stance on Olympic participation. However, there is a reason why “bargaining” is a key word in the CBA. If Olympic participation is a sticking point for the players, the NHL could use it as leverage in another area of negotiations. Sportsnet’s Chris Johnston reports that NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, NHLPA Executive Director Donald Fehr, and IIHF President Rene Fasel plan to meet in Sweden in two weeks during the NHL Global Series between the Buffalo Sabres and Tampa Bay Lightning in Stockholm. The trio of leaders will discuss the issues and options regarding the league’s Olympic participation, but there is unlikely to be a resolution from just the one meeting. Johnston calls the Olympic issue a “major hurdle” in CBA talks, so it could be that the upcoming summit is just the beginning of working toward an answer.

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Executive Director of the NHL Players Association Donald Fehr talks about it being to premature to talk about what could happen if players go to the Olympics First, NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr spoke to the media about the NHL ’ s decision Monday to remove itself from the 2018 Olympics .

Representatives from the National Hockey League , led by Commissioner Gary Bettman, completed two days of meetings Friday with members of the NHL Players ' Association , International Ice Hockey Federation and International Olympic Committee on the subject of NHL player participation in the

Gary Bettman wearing a suit and tie© Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports
  • One of the more notable NHL players to sign in Europe this off-season is already out of a job. The KHL announced that Lokomotiv Yaroslavl has terminated the contract of forward Ty Rattie. It’s unclear if this was a mutual termination or if Rattie was cut from the team, but either way the 26-year-old winger will be looking for a new place to play. The news comes as a surprise, as Rattie has recorded nine points in 16 games for Lokomotiv and was part of a strong core group of former NHLers alongside Stephane Da Costa, Anton Lander, and Jakub Nakladal. The KHL is no stranger to payroll problems, which may have led to Rattie’s release, but one would think that the team could have traded him instead. Thus, it is more likely that Rattie requested his contract be terminated to go play elsewhere. After a career-high 50 NHL games with the Edmonton Oilers last season, it very well could be that Rattie feels he belongs in North America and has been waiting for an opportunity. Stay tuned to this story to see what comes next for the former second-round pick.
  • Going the other way is big, two-way forward Connor Brickley. Brickley had a difficult summer, failing to find an NHL contract despite a full season with the Florida Panthers in 2017-18 and a nice stretch run with the New York Rangers last year. On top of that, he failed to turn PTO’s with both the Rangers and their AHL affiliate, the Hartford Wolf Pack, into a contract. As a result, Brickley has decided to take his talents to Germany. EC Salzburg of the Austrian-based EBEL has announced a one-year contract with Brickley. A high-scoring AHLer and a veteran of 81 NHL games, Brickley immediately becomes the most decorated player on the Red Bulls’ roster and should provide a major boost to the team this year. Brickley likely hopes that a dominant performance in the EBEL will be enough to garner more attention in North America next off-season.

The confluence of culture, politics and hockey .
The NHL is as flawed and blinkered as any other professional sports league, but it is doing something right here. It allows its players, their families, and their fans to tell their stories, and those stories have an impact.  Much as I, and many other fans bristle at the naked politicization of sports, we still have something meaningful to fall back on. Some of us may indulge our cynical sides by claiming it is nothing more than slick marketing, but those people and stories are real. And they’re saving us by letting us know that there is more to life than politics. I am grateful for that.

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