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Sport Facial recognition creeps into everything at CES 2020

15:46  10 january  2020
15:46  10 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

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At CES , facial recognition appeared to be on the verge of wedging itself into spots it had never been before. The trade show itself implemented facial In the US, almost no regulations on facial recognition exist, outside of Illinois's biometrics law. Everything that Konami did -- taking my image

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Konami Gaming, a slot machine maker, wants to weave facial recognition into its one-armed bandits. During a visit to its Las Vegas headquarters to hear more about its plans, I quickly discovered what a world where facial recognition is everywhere would feel like.

a screenshot of a computer: At Konami's headquarters in Las Vegas, its facial recognition powered cameras tracked me around the room. Alfred Ng / CNET© Provided by CNET At Konami's headquarters in Las Vegas, its facial recognition powered cameras tracked me around the room. Alfred Ng / CNET

"Hello, Alfred," said a measured, robotic voice, startling me. It came from a kiosk called "Biometrics Welcome Console" positioned right next to the door of the conference room where my meeting was held. The kiosk knew who I was because Konami had set up a profile for me, using a public photo from my CNET bio without telling me. The facial recognition tagged me before I had even said hello to the Konami team members in the room.

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Facial recognition technology has always been controversial. It makes people nervous about Big Brother. In recent years, facial recognition algorithms have improved in accuracy, and companies like Amazon offer products That is so wild. I don’t know. [LAUGHS] It creeps me out as a reporter.

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I looked at the screen showing the photo the kiosk took of me when I walked in. The camera had caught just my eyes and nose. Still, the facial recognition software calculated it detected me with 60.5% accuracy.

"Any picture you use online can be used to identify you already," Sina Miri, Konami's vice president of innovation and strategic research and design, told me. Konami had also set up profiles of my colleagues at the visit, also without telling them.

Throughout the interview, Konami's facial recognition cameras followed us. They captured our images so many times that the kiosk kept greeting us long after I had already arrived. Eventually, a Konami staffer resorted to covering her face with paper to keep the machine quiet while we stood out of its view.

Facial recognition creeps into everything at CES 2020

  Facial recognition creeps into everything at CES 2020 -

# ces 2020 #ceslive #techpodcasts FaceMe is an AI-powered facial recognition platform Now, this type of facial recognition isn't like what has been in the news lately. Because of the success of both the product and the technology, the company saw the value of the system and turned it into FaceMe.

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The exchange, which Konami saw as a positive demonstration of its capabilities but I viewed as an invasion of privacy, illustrates the fine line that facial recognition needs to walk. Technology companies can't wait to incorporate the feature, which takes the form of something as benign as FaceID on your iPhone, into more gadgets and systems. But consumer advocates worry it'll have a chilling effect on our privacy.

a flat screen tv sitting on top of a television: Konami set up a facial recognition profile for me using my CNET profile picture without telling me. Alfred Ng / CNET© Provided by CNET Konami set up a facial recognition profile for me using my CNET profile picture without telling me. Alfred Ng / CNET

But facial recognition's spread marches on. Over the last decade, anything you can think of -- toothbrushes, televisions, cars, refrigerators and even beds -- have been connected to the internet. Within the next 10 years, facial recognition companies hope to do the same with their technology. CES 2020, where many of these companies showed their wares, was a glimpse into what the future of surveillance could look like. The annual tech conference was a prime spot to help make the biometric service mainstream.

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Facial recognition – fascinating and intriguing. Few biometric technologies are sparking our imagination quite like face recognition . Facial recognition will be a significant topic for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo (postponed Again the questions of privacy, consent, and function creep

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At Konami's headquarters in Las Vegas, its facial recognition powered cameras tracked me around the room.© Alfred Ng / CNET

At Konami's headquarters in Las Vegas, its facial recognition powered cameras tracked me around the room.

Just as connecting a television to the internet was a fairly new concept in 2011, facial recognition is essentially uncharted territory now. That might change fast. By 2019, analysts found that you couldn't buy a new TV without an internet connection. Facial recognition companies want that sort of acceptance for their technology.

That means inserting FR, as the technology is called in shorthand, into every part of your life. You'll experience it at the shopping mall, at school and in your own home.

"Once it's used in other industries, it'll be in places everywhere," said Tom Soukup, Konami's senior vice president and chief systems products officer. "There's going to be widespread customer acceptance within the next two, three years."

But facial recognition is used by police departments and government agencies for investigations, often without legal guidelines that protect citizens when it's used. Lawmakers have raised concerns about the effect on free speech if police could use facial recognition to pinpoint and track protesters in a crowd, for example.

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"This is a tech that threatens to supercharge our cameras and turn them into surveillance devices like never before," Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst at the American Civil Liberties Union, said.

Forward facing

When everything became connected online in the last decade, the convenience came with some strings attached. For televisions, it meant that companies could start tracking people's viewing habits and sell that data to advertisers.

With facial recognition, it could happen on a broader scale. You can't change your face the way you can change an advertising ID associated with your device.

At CES, facial recognition appeared to be on the verge of wedging itself into spots it had never been before. The trade show itself implemented facial recognition for badge pick-ups for the first time, while companies like LG showed off a door that could scan your face to unlock. A storage box for marijuana using facial recognition also won a CES innovation award.

Konami Gaming showed off its plans for implementing facial recognition in slot machines on Wednesday, explaining that gamblers could use their faces for loyalty and rewards programs from a casino.

a screenshot of a computer: All it took was a capture of my eyes and nose and the facial recognition detected me in nearly an instant. Alfred Ng / CNET© Provided by CNET All it took was a capture of my eyes and nose and the facial recognition detected me in nearly an instant. Alfred Ng / CNET

Konami's Miri envisions a future in which pervasive online tracking for targeted advertising that Google and Facebook conduct could be brought to the real world with facial recognition.

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"Once we face ID you, what we do is build a profile," Miri said. "If we know your favorite drink is rum and coke, we can put an advertisement of a specific brand of rum where you are, for example."

Throughout the interview, Soukup referred to our faces as "QR codes," reducing one of our most intimate, personal features to a machine-scannable barcode.

Soukup said Konami didn't have privacy officers who work on facial recognition development at its headquarters. Instead, the company has compliance officers, whose job is to make sure its technology meets the minimum standards of privacy laws like the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation, which includes provisions covering biometric information.

In the US, almost no regulations on facial recognition exist, outside of Illinois's biometric law. For example, everything that Konami did -- taking my image without my permission to build a profile and then constantly tracking me through their office when I never opted in -- is completely legal.

"We're living in a wild west when it comes to privacy protections," the ACLU's Stanley said. "Most deployments of facial recognition aren't empowering individuals, but they're empowering the companies that lie behind those devices."

How convenient?

Konami's executives said that facial recognition would speed up the process for gamblers looking to get loyalty rewards points. Under the current system, it takes about a minute and a half. With the biometric, Miri says, it would take 30 seconds.

You'd be exchanging a potential lifetime of facial tracking to save a minute.

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PopID, a facial recognition company based in California, is behind facial recognition for businesses like Deli Time and Stoner's Pizza Joint. It's also got its technology on the campuses of schools like Stanford University and University of Southern California.

The company provided a similar comparison, saying it takes about 90 seconds to order food through facial recognition, compared to 3 minutes without it.

Yale Goldberg, PopID's vice president of strategy and business development, says the company's facial recognition is in more than 100 locations that ring up more than 1,500 transactions per week.

He says facial recognition will spread, pointing out the success it's had at PopID's parent company, Cali Burger.

"We have significantly more loyal top customers than we did before we had these kiosks. It's because they know they can get this great experience every time," Goldberg said. "They don't need to add their onions and light ketchup and everything else. We know that for them. We make their lives easier."

Facial recognition companies believe this technology will be everywhere in the next five years, pointing out that the convenience will win over the public.

But with unease building against technology companies over privacy, more people are becoming aware of the strings attached to that convenience, the ACLU's Stanley said.

"We've seen a growing backlash against facial recognition in the country and growing understanding of the technology's consequences," Stanley said. "We need to be very, very wary about exchanging convenience for a world that we don't recognize anymore."

Before leaving Konami's office, I asked the company's staff to delete the profile it had made of me, along with any other biometric data that their cameras collected during my visit.

The staff deleted my profile but said they'd need to contact Konami's biometric supplier to get rid of the data they collected on me. I wasn't able to stay to see that happen.

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