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Sport MLB commissioner Rob Manfred isn't optimistic about 162-game season

08:05  26 march  2020
08:05  26 march  2020 Source:   usatoday.com

Now that NBA, NHL have taken action on coronavirus, what will MLB do?

  Now that NBA, NHL have taken action on coronavirus, what will MLB do? After the NBA announced it is suspending its season, it is sure to put pressure on other sports leagues.The NHL issued a statement which indicated it is “continuing to consult with medical experts” and “evaluating the options.” A more detailed update can be expected tomorrow, the NHL said in its announcement.

Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred , encouraged by the pace of baseball’s labor talks, hopes that a new deal will And I think it probably is a good thing for the game .’’ On increased netting at ballparks this season : “The changes and recommendations we made with the clubs were

Commissioner Rob Manfred suggested the players will have to take a pay cut to facilitate a 162 - game season . As a fan, going from 162 games to 154 games would stink, because everyone wants more baseball . That said, we're talking about eight fewer games spread across a 183-day season .

On the eve of what would have been Major League Baseball's opening day, commissioner Rob Manfred indicated that the league is "probably not gonna be able to" play a full, 162-game regular season.

"My optimistic outlook is that at some point in May we’ll be gearing back up. We’ll have to make a determination depending on what the precise date is as to how much of a preparation period we need," Manfred said in an interview Wednesday night on ESPN's "SportsCenter With Scott Van Pelt," adding: "But the one thing I know for sure is baseball will be back. Whenever it's safe to play, we'll be back. ... We will be part of the recovery, the healing in this country from this particular pandemic."

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Commissioner Rob Manfred broached the subject back in May, and while he didn' t make a clear endorsement for or against the 162 - game schedule, he sounded open to alterations. "One hundred and sixty-two games in 183 days, and a lot of those 21 days consumed by travel, is a pretty demanding

Commissioner Rob Manfred said nothing "needs to be fixed" in baseball but gave several proposals to reduce dead time, such a 30-second time limit for how long managers can MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred explains the potential rule changes the league can use to increase the pace of the game .

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An executive with knowledge of the negotiations told USA TODAY Sports that MLB and the players union are close to reaching an agreement on critical economic issues with hopes of salvaging the majority of the 162-game season, even if it means playing regular doubleheaders and the World Series in late November.

Rob Manfred wearing a suit and tie: MLB commissioner Rob Manfred speaks to the media before announcing the All-MLB team during the MLB Winter Meetings at Manchester Grand Hyatt. © Orlando Ramirez, USA TODAY Sports MLB commissioner Rob Manfred speaks to the media before announcing the All-MLB team during the MLB Winter Meetings at Manchester Grand Hyatt.

All of this, of course, is contingent on the dissipation of the novel coronavirus in a time frame that would realistically allow for a lengthy season. 

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Rob Manfred was talking only in the vaguest of senses: here is a proposal that hasn' t been made MLB is doing good work attempting to speed up the games , but simply having fewer games would These things only creep upward. Still, I kind of like that Rob Manfred is willing to just throw shit out

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred is unhappy with the increasing length of games and is taking measures to address the matter. Manfred said officials in the commissioner 's office have reached out to the Major League Baseball Players Association to let the union know that they're "concerned"

"I also think that we need to be creative in terms of what the schedule looks like, what the postseason format looks like," Manfred said in the ESPN interview. "Nothing is off the table for us right now. ... There's a lot of ideas out there and we are open to all of them."

On Wednesday, powerhouse agent Scott Boras suggested a plan to play as close to a 162-game schedule as possible, a full version of the playoffs with a neutral-site World Series culminating around Christmas.

MLB's best hope is to start the season around June 1, and no later than July 1, but are following the lead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. On March 15, the CDC recommended against gatherings of 50 or more people "for the next eight weeks." 

Manfred also told ESPN that the investigation into the Boston Red Sox's sign-stealing is "done," but he has not had time to write up a report. The commissioner plans to release a report before play resumes.

Major League Baseball pushes back opening day to mid-May at earliest

  Major League Baseball pushes back opening day to mid-May at earliest NEW YORK (AP) Major League Baseball pushes back opening day to mid-May at earliest, in accordance with CDC guidelines.NEW YORK (AP) -- Major League Baseball pushed back opening day until mid-May at the earliest on Monday because of the new coronavirus after the federal government recommended restricting events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks.

New MLB commissioner Rob Manfred is right that baseball needs to be open to change, and not just by eliminating defensive shifts. Why? The major league batting average last year was .251. It is harder to get a hit in the major leagues than at any time in the 42 seasons since the DH was added.

Newly elected MLB commissioner Rob Manfred made an appearance at the Little League World Series. Rob Carr/Getty Images. Which frees Manfred to reorganize the commissioner 's office, draw in more expertise from outside the game and empower a different level of debate than we've been

MLB's opening day was originally scheduled for Thursday until the season was indefinitely postponed on March 12 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This happened a day after the NBA suspended its season after Utah Jazz player Rudy Gobert tested positive for the coronavirus setting off a cavalcade of sports postponements and cancellations. Previously scheduled games in Major League Soccer and the NHL also were postponed, and the men's and women's NCAA tournaments were canceled.

Contributing: Bob Nightengale.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: MLB commissioner Rob Manfred isn't optimistic about 162-game season

Related slideshow: The Impact of Coronavirus on Sports (provided by imagn)

a sign on the side of a building: The sign on Progressive Field, home of the Cleveland Indians, has been changed to show that Major League Baseballs opening day is now on hold. The Mid-American Conference basketball tournament, which was to be held next door at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse was cancelled along with the NCAA tournament and most professional sporting events to prevent the spread of the Covid-19 coronavirus. 

Will There Be College Football in 2020? Athletic Directors Weigh In .
Nearly one-fifth of Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) athletic directors believe there is at least a 50 percent chance a full college football season won’t be played this fall because of the impact of COVID-19. And if there is no college football, what would be the fallout from the nation’s universities and athletic programs?“There better be (a season) or many programs will be out of business,” an athletic director said.“Quite simply,” added another AD, “it would be devastating.”Another AD was more direct: “If there’s no season, we will be f*****.

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