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Sport Lane Kiffin shares how Ole Miss has fallen behind amid pandemic

23:50  13 june  2020
23:50  13 june  2020 Source:   yardbarker.com

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College football activity hadn’t started when the coronavirus pandemic really began to affect the United States, but now that we’re in our fourth month of it, offseason activities have been significantly derailed. That is causing major issues for a lot of programs.

Lane Kiffin standing in front of a crowd: As Lane Kiffin explained, not being able to be in the same place as his players has had a negative effect on the program. © Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports As Lane Kiffin explained, not being able to be in the same place as his players has had a negative effect on the program.

Lane Kiffin’s Ole Miss Rebels are dealing with those issues and then some. As a first-year coach, Kiffin has a lot of work to do getting to know his players and what makes them tick. The fact that players have not been allowed on campus or at practice has left players and coaches unfamiliar with each other, and Kiffin cited that as a huge issue, via Jake Thompson of the Oxford Eagle:

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“This situation is not ideal for a first-year staff, probably creating more issues than I thought. Spring ball, you really get to know your players. You’re on the field with them. You’re interacting with them and putting faces with names. They get to know you and how you can help them on the field. We missed all of that.

“Unfortunately, when we were in our meetings last Monday talking about all of the stuff going on nationally and just listening to the kids, I just realized how little I know our kids, especially as a head coach. Position coaches have had some meetings and gotten to know them, and we’re behind obviously football-wise, but we’re really behind relationship-wise.”

Kiffin said he has used Zoom calls to try to compensate, but his interaction has been limited outside of voluntary workouts. He has finally started to build those vital relationships in recent weeks, particularly with Ole Miss players and coaches participating in a Unity walk last weekend. Kiffin discussed that experience and how he’s started to get on with his players at length, as well as how the recent protests throughout the country have affected his players. His quotes in the entire article are worth a read.

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Kiffin has already endeared himself to the fans. He’s getting a late start, but he should win over the players, too. It sounds like that process is finally beginning, and it’s a good look into just how major programs have had to operate in these uncertain times.

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More must-reads:

  • Lane Kiffin on why he took Ole Miss job: 'Because it was in the SEC'
  • The last time successful college football programs were terrible
  • The 'College Football National Champions' quiz

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usr: 1
This is interesting!