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Sport Steve Kerr says Maya Moore 'a champion' after Jonathan Irons' release

01:17  03 july  2020
01:17  03 july  2020 Source:   nbcsports.com

Renee Montgomery Explains Why She’s Stepping Away From the WNBA This Season

  Renee Montgomery Explains Why She’s Stepping Away From the WNBA This Season Atlanta Dream guard Renee Montgomery woke up nervous. She was about to send a tweet that would put her in the national spotlight and change the course of her athletic career. “I pressed send on the tweet,” she said, and “I was like, okay, so it’s done.”  “I pressed send on the tweet,” she told Deadspin, and “I was like, okay, so it’s done.

Maya Moore was instrumental in securing the release of Jonathan Irons . Irons , 40, was serving a 50-year prison sentence after the nonfatal shooting of a homeowner in the St. Louis Moore , a four-time WNBA champion who played in college at UConn, met Irons through a prison ministry program

Maya Moore steps away from WNBA, Tokyo 2020 for criminal justice reform 01:21. (CNN) Four-time WNBA champion Maya Moore sat out for an entire season to help "Thank God it's over," Moore said in a video of Irons ' release she posted on her Instagram, captioned with the word "FREEDOM."

Steve Kerr says Maya Moore 'a champion' after Jonathan Irons' release originally appeared on NBC Sports Bay Area

Maya Moore won four WNBA titles with the Minnesota Lynx, but she has not earned a ring since 2017. Moore took a sabbatical from the sport to advocate for a Missouri man she believed was wrongfully imprisoned, and her work resulted in his overturned conviction in March and his release from prison earlier this week.

Although she paused her career, Warriors coach Steve Kerr believes Moore remains worthy of the distinction as champion.

Man central to Maya Moore's WNBA hiatus freed after 23 years in prison

  Man central to Maya Moore's WNBA hiatus freed after 23 years in prison Twenty-three years after he was convicted for a burglary in which he steadfastly denied being involved, Jonathan Irons walked out of Missouri's Jefferson City Correctional Center a free man on Wednesday, thanks in large part to former WNBA MVP Maya Moore. Moore, a six-time All-Star and four-time champion with the Minnesota Lynx from 2011-18, first met Irons in 2007, and the two remained in close contact, according to The New York Times' KurtMoore, a six-time All-Star and four-time champion with the Minnesota Lynx from 2011-18, first met Irons in 2007, and the two remained in close contact, according to The New York Times' Kurt Streeter.

Maya Moore , the W.N.B.A. star regarded as one of the greats of the sport, will sit out for a second straight season and remove herself from contention for the Olympics so she can continue to push for criminal justice reform and the release of Jonathan Irons , a man she believes is innocent of the

In 2019, Maya Moore put her WNBA career on hold to help the case of a man she believed had been wrongfully imprisoned. The six-time All-Star sat There she met Irons , now 40, as he walked outside the prison doors a free man. Moore dropped to her knees before embracing the man whose freedom

Jonathan Irons, a 40-year-old Black man, was sentenced to 50 years in prison after being convicted of breaking into a home outside of St. Louis and twice shooting a homeowner. Irons was 16 at the time the alleged crime took place, but he was tried and convicted as an adult. There were no corroborating witnesses, and a judge ruled on March 9 that prosecutors withheld fingerprint evidence which failed to implicate Irons.

After serving nearly a quarter-century, Irons was released Wednesday.

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Moore met Irons in 2007, just before she became a star at UConn. The one-time WNBA MVP and WNBA Finals MVP announced in 2019 that she was taking a sabbatical from the league in order to pursue her "ministry dreams" and spend time with family, and Moore announced earlier this year her sabbatical would continue in order to push for criminal justice reform and Irons' release.

Trio of former UConn greats leading social justice charge

  Trio of former UConn greats leading social justice charge NEW YORK (AP) — Renee Montgomery and Tiffany Hayes appreciated what former UConn teammate Maya Moore was doing when the All-Star forward stepped away from basketball two years ago to focus on criminal justice reform. The Atlanta Dream guards admit they weren't sure why she couldn't continue playing at the same time. Now they have a better understanding. “I had no idea,” Hayes said on a Zoom call last week. “I thought she wanted a break or something. ... Now I get it, I see what she was going through and trying to accomplish. I commend her for what she’s doing.

WNBA star Maya Moore put her career on hold to help Jonathon Irons , 40, who was just 16 when he was convicted and sentenced to Moore was one of the first people Jonathan Irons , 40, saw when he was released . Trending News. Fort Hood soldier believed dead, family says ; suspect kills himself.

Jonathan Irons , whose conviction on burglary and assault charges was overturned was greeted by the W.N.B.A. star Maya Moore as he was released from a Missouri penitentiary on Wednesday.Credit Julia Hansen for The New York Times.

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Her decision was largely unprecedented. Moore turned 31 last month, and Five Thirty-Eight's Chris Herring wrote then that no professional athlete as successful as Moore had willingly walked away from their career during their peak years.

"Champion" might be an understatement.

WNBA players to honor victims of police and racial violence on jerseys; 'Say her name' to be on warm-up shirts .
The league will also be forming a social justice council comprised of Layshia Clarendon, Sydney Colson, Breanna Stewart, Tierra Ruffin-Pratt, A'ja Wilson and Satou Sabally, among others. In its inaugural season, the Social Justice Council will cultivate designated spaces for community conversations, virtual roundtables, player-produced podcasts, and other activations to address this country's long history of inequality, implicit bias and systemic racism that has targeted black and brown communities.

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