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Sport Koepka brimming with confidence ahead of title defence

00:50  05 august  2020
00:50  05 august  2020 Source:   reuters.com

Injury-limited Brooks Koepka confident ahead of upcoming title defenses despite recent form

  Injury-limited Brooks Koepka confident ahead of upcoming title defenses despite recent form Brooks Koepka’s confidence hasn’t been kneecapped. “I’m defending, aren't I?,” Koepka said Wednesday when asked if his recent struggles have raised doubt about winning next week’s PGA Championship. “Yeah,” the reporter responded. “OK. Just checking,” Koepka sa id with a matter-of-fact, self-assuring tone. More precisely, Koepka will be the two-time defending champion when the game’s best converge at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco next week for the first major of the COVID-marred year. And he’ll try to become the first to win the Wanamaker Trophy three consecutive times since the PGA Championship went to stroke-play in 1958.

A year ago almost to the day, Brooks Koepka followed form figures of 2-1-2-4 in the four majors by flying directly to Memphis and winning the WGC-FedEx St Jude Invitational. That gave the four-time major winner a healthy three-point lead at the top of the world rankings, but 12 months on the contrast

Germany are hoping to become the first team to retain the title since Brazil in 1962. World champions Germany expect nothing less than a fifth World Cup triumph in Russia next year, with coach Joachim Loew pointing to an abundance of player choices as his main weapon. The Germans are reaping the

By Rory Carroll

Brooks Koepka holding a baseball bat: FILE PHOTO: PGA: WGC - FedEx St. Jude Invitational - Final Round © Reuters/Christopher Hanewinckel FILE PHOTO: PGA: WGC - FedEx St. Jude Invitational - Final Round

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - A confident Brooks Koepka said on Tuesday he had ironed out the kinks that hindered his game earlier this year and added that he will claim a third consecutive PGA Championship this week if he plays at the level he is capable of.

Koepka would become the only player to hoist the Wanamaker Trophy three years in a row since the tournament switched from being a matchplay event to a stroke play event in 1958.

Brooks Koepka making playoff push before seeking treatment on injured knee

  Brooks Koepka making playoff push before seeking treatment on injured knee "We'll see when my season ends and go get stem cell again, most likely, and then figure it out from there." Koepka underwent a stem cell treatment on his left knee to repair a partially torn patella tendon right after last season ended. He tried to make his season debut a few months later, though withdrew from The CJ Cup in South Korea in October after he slipped on wet concrete and re-tore the tendon. © Provided by Yahoo! Sports Though his knee has still been bothering him, Brooks Koepka is trying to make a push for the FedExCup Playoffs before seeking treatment.

Koepka fell short in his title defence at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational, finishing in a four-way tie for second three shots behind champion Justin Thomas. That has left Koepka optimistic ahead of the US PGA Championship, where he will be aiming for a third straight success starting on Thursday.

“We have a very big goal and that is to defend the title .” Loew, in charge since 2006, had always wanted at least two equally skilled players for each position and he is guaranteed that wish for next year. First choice keeper Neuer will be back from injury early next year but even without him, Loew

Walter Hagen won the tournament four consecutive times between 1924-1927.

"I feel very confident in myself," he told reporters at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco.

"I don't put any expectations on myself. Just go out and play golf exactly like I know how and, if I do that, then yeah I probably should win."

In the weeks leading up to the tournament few gave the 30-year-old much of a chance as he struggled with left knee soreness after the PGA Tour resumed in mid-June but the American came alive in Memphis last week to finish tied for second place.

The four-time major winner and former world number one said he was more comfortable playing on the sport's biggest stages because he thrives under pressure.

"The way the golf course sets up eliminates pretty much half the guys, and then from there half of those guys probably won't play well," he said.

Pete Cowen woke a slumping Brooks Koepka, which is bad news for everyone else

  Pete Cowen woke a slumping Brooks Koepka, which is bad news for everyone else Pete Cowen gave Brooks Koepka an awakening, and it showed in Thursday's 62 in Memphis. But his track record says it'll show, too, in next week's PGA Championship.There’s a fine line between pointed criticism and verbal abuse, but somewhere between a much-needed intervention and some unfiltered tough love, Cowen, the no-nonsense Englishman who coaches some of the game’s very best ball-strikers, arrived at that tipping point with Brooks Koepka.

"We have a very big goal and that is to defend the title ." Loew, in charge since 2006, had always wanted at least two equally skilled players for each position and he is guaranteed that wish for next year. First choice keeper Neuer will be back from injury early next year but even without him, Loew

Koepka fell short in his title defence at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational, finishing in a four-way tie for second three shots behind champion Justin Thomas. That has left Koepka optimistic ahead of the US PGA Championship, where he will be aiming for a third straight success starting on Thursday.

"Then from there I feel like mentally I can beat them, the other half, so you've probably got ten guys. That's the way I see it."

Koepka said he cannot wait to attack TPC Harding Park, where the thick rough and narrow fairways reward accuracy off the tee.

"I'm excited. This is a big-boy golf course. Got to hit it straight and put it in the fairway. It's going to be quite long," he said of the 7,251 yard par-70 municipal layout, which is expected to experience cooler temperatures this week.

"I think it kind of plays into my hands."

Koepka will be grouped with last year's U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland and the 2019 British Open winner Irishman Shane Lowry on Thursday and Friday at the first major of the year, which is being played without fans due to the novel coronavirus.

(Reporting by Rory Carroll; Editing by Ken Ferris)


Gallery: Photos show what golf's biggest stars looked like when their careers started (Business Insider)

Pete Cowen woke a slumping Brooks Koepka, which is bad news for everyone else

  Pete Cowen woke a slumping Brooks Koepka, which is bad news for everyone else Pete Cowen gave Brooks Koepka an awakening, and it showed in Thursday's 62 in Memphis. But his track record says it'll show, too, in next week's PGA Championship.There’s a fine line between pointed criticism and verbal abuse, but somewhere between a much-needed intervention and some unfiltered tough love, Cowen, the no-nonsense Englishman who coaches some of the game’s very best ball-strikers, arrived at that tipping point with Brooks Koepka.

"We have a very big goal and that is to defend the title ." Loew, in charge since 2006, had always wanted at least two equally skilled players for each position and he is guaranteed that wish for next year. First choice keeper Neuer will be back from injury early next year but even without him, Loew

American Brooks Koepka putted brilliantly to win the U.S. Open by one stroke at Shinnecock Hills on Sunday, becoming the first player in almost 30 years to successfully defend his title . Fleetwood, playing more than two hours ahead of the overnight leaders and starting the day six shots off the

a person looking at the camera: Because golf allows for longer careers, many of the best golfers have already been playing for a decade or more.Some golfers look entirely different now than they did when their careers began.Take a look at the difference below.Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.Many of the world's greatest golfers turn pro as teenagers and grow up right before our eyes.Yet, down the road, it is easy to forget just how much many of these golfers have changed since they started their pro careers, and how much better their fashion sense has become.Below we take a look at what guys like Phil Mickelson, Dustin Johnson, Jordan Spieth, and Jason Day looked like before they were famous.Read the original article on Business Insider

Playing his sixth event in a row, Brooks Koepka 'flat' during opening 72 .
Playing in his sixth tournament in a row, Brooks Koepka would prefer to have this week off. But needing to make a push for the playoffs, Koepka began the week "pretty flat."Then there's the reality of the situation: Koepka entered the week at No. 92 in the FedExCup standings, and playing this week, even while exhausted, could help improve his standing in the season-long race.

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