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Sport Black scholar Earl Lewis on the Floyd murder and reparations

21:05  19 june  2021
21:05  19 june  2021 Source:   ap.org

Black-led nonprofit receives 'reparations payment' from slaveholder's descendant

  Black-led nonprofit receives 'reparations payment' from slaveholder's descendant A nonprofit organization supporting the Black community said they received a "six-figure reparations payment" from a someone who discovered her ancestor enslaved people. Andreana Bridges, an administrative associate at Change Today, Change Tomorrow, a Black-led 501(c)(3) based in Louisville, told ABC News on Tuesday that the donor would like to remain anonymous and wished for the money to be looked at "as a reparations payment, not a donation.

Reparations, Earl Lewis says, are not about the past.

This undated photo provided by the Center for Social Solutions, University of Michigan, shows Dr. Earl Lewis. Lewis says reparations are not about the past. The founding director of the University of Michigan Center for Social Solutions has developed a program, funded by a $5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, for nine universities to work with their communities to develop research-based reparation solutions that could be expanded across the country.    (Courtesy of Dr. Earl Lewis/Center for Social Solutions, University of Michigan via AP) © Provided by Associated Press This undated photo provided by the Center for Social Solutions, University of Michigan, shows Dr. Earl Lewis. Lewis says reparations are not about the past. The founding director of the University of Michigan Center for Social Solutions has developed a program, funded by a $5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, for nine universities to work with their communities to develop research-based reparation solutions that could be expanded across the country. (Courtesy of Dr. Earl Lewis/Center for Social Solutions, University of Michigan via AP)

Rather, they are very much about the present, says the founding director of the University of Michigan Center for Social Solutions. Earlier this year, he notes, Evanston, Illinois, became the first U.S. city to pay eligible Black residents restitution for previous city policies that were racist.

Slavery makes a weak case for California's modern-day reparations

  Slavery makes a weak case for California's modern-day reparations Meaningful tests aside, how could California's Reparations Task Force make reparations happen in a way that is efficient and fair?The task force members are in charge of recommending reparations proposals that would include almost everything from land to scholarships to direct cash payments. But they have committed a series of categorical mistakes by making invidious comparisons to reparations made to Japanese who were interred during World War II, Jewish victims of the Holocaust, and Americans who suffered from illnesses as a result of 9/11. Reparations were made to individuals in these groups on the premise that provable damages were established.

And, he says, reparations can be part of the future. This year, Lewis’ initiative, called “Crafting Democratic Futures: Situating Colleges and Universities in Community-based Reparations Solutions,” received a $5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The money will be used to organize programs among nine universities and their surrounding communities that will consider what a reparations plan might include.

The Associated Press spoke recently with Lewis, 66, about reparations and his other work, including as a featured speaker at a forthcoming event, “America’s Racial Reckoning: What Nonprofits and Their Funders Should Do Next,” a free virtual program co-sponsored by The Associated Press, the Chronicle of Philanthropy and The Conversation, on June 23.

Colorado principal resigns after Snapchat photo shows students re-enacting murder of George Floyd

  Colorado principal resigns after Snapchat photo shows students re-enacting murder of George Floyd Rachael Ayers resigned as principal of Mead High School, but it's unclear if the resignation it's related to the photo of the students.St. Vrain Valley Schools Superintendent Don Haddad said in a letter to parents obtained by USA TODAY that Mead High School Principal Rachael Ayers resigned after having multiple roles at the school in the past 12 years.

Lewis, who is the Thomas C. Holt Distinguished University Professor of History, Afroamerican and African Studies, and public policy at the University of Michigan, received a Ph.D. in history from the University of Minnesota. He co-edited the 11-volume Young Oxford History of African Americans and was president of the Mellon Foundation from 2013 to 2018.

The interview was edited for clarity and length.

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Q: WHY FOCUS ON REPARATIONS NOW?

A: This project came out of a set of national moments of reckoning after the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor among others. In late August, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation sent out an invitation to scholars around the country to come up with a plan to deal with racial justice and racial healing, which they call Just Futures. How do you actually secure a just future? I had started teaching a course the semester before on history, reparations and public policy. I was reflecting on where we were in 2020, with COVID as the backdrop, thinking about the ongoing murders of African American men and women, who, in my view, didn’t warrant being killed. I thought, what can we do? I wondered if it was possible to build on the work that had already taken hold in Evanston, Illinois, and Asheville, North Carolina. That started us on the path that we’re still on.

Black Democrats press leaders for reparations vote this month

  Black Democrats press leaders for reparations vote this month Black Democrats are pressing hard on party leaders to stage a reparations vote this month, citing the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre as impetus for Congress to launch a study into the delicate question of whether the country owes Black Americans restitution for slavery.A number of Congressional Black Caucus members had visited Tulsa, Okla., late last month, joining President Biden at the site of the 1921 massacre in the Greenwood neighborhood then known as Black Wall Street. The lawmakers, though already pushing for a floor vote on the legislation, returned from the experience with a heightened urgency to see it done this summer.

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Q: WHY A COMMUNITY-BASED EFFORT RATHER THAN A NATIONAL ONE?

A: There’s a huge debate nationwide about this right now. My colleagues William Darity and Kirsten Mullen (authors of “From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century”) have been pretty strong in their claims that the only entity that can actually address the reparations question is the federal government. By their calculations, the price tag is somewhere between $10 trillion and $12 trillion. And they actually think all of this work – by communities or companies or foundations or you name it – is misplaced because they don’t have the resources to truly come up with a reparations solution. But I’m a historian. And if you read the history of social change in America, it comes in both directions from the top down – from the federal government through legislation – but also from the ground up – from the grassroots, from communities agitating for social change. That’s the story of the civil rights struggle.

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Q: WHAT DO YOU SAY TO ARGUMENTS THAT REPARATIONS AREN'T NEEDED BECAUSE SLAVERY IS IN THE PAST?

Black scholar Earl Lewis on the Floyd murder and reparations

  Black scholar Earl Lewis on the Floyd murder and reparations Reparations, Earl Lewis says, are not about the past. Rather, they are very much about the present, says the founding director of the University of Michigan Center for Social Solutions. Earlier this year, he notes, Evanston, Illinois, became the first U.S. city to pay eligible Black residents restitution for previous city policies that were racist. And, he says, reparations can be part of the future. This year, Lewis’ initiative, called “Crafting Democratic Futures: Situating Colleges and Universities in Community-based Reparations Solutions,” received a $5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

A: Slavery was in the past. It still has a legacy of fact. But we don’t have to stop at slavery. We can actually go into the era of Jim Crow and redlining, and the ways in which the federal government systematically discriminated against African American homeowners. Or we can go to the G.I. Bill and how it disproportionately favored whites and was against African Americans and others who served. We can look at the ways in which the criminal justice system turned the “War on Drugs” into mass incarceration that disproportionately affected African-Americans.

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Q: EVEN THE PANDEMIC SHOWED AFRICAN AMERICANS FARED DISPROPORTIONATELY WORSE THAN OTHER GROUPS.

A: Exactly. We have to figure out a way to move forward together to repair the damage of the past. This is not a time for an ostrich-like approach, sticking our heads in the sand hoping that if we stick them there long enough it will all go away. It hasn’t. And it won’t.

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Q: DO YOU THINK PHILANTHROPY SHOULD FUND MORE RESEARCH ON COMPLICATED ISSUES?

A: As the former president of a major philanthropy in the United States, I was always mindful of the power that you have when you control billions of dollars in assets. Oftentimes, it makes it look like somehow all of the assets stem from the fact that you have billions of dollars. It’s important for us to have the financial resources necessary to undertake what we’re doing. It’s also important we remind ourselves and others that other assets — human assets and human capital — are as important. When I stepped away from being the president of the Mellon Foundation and went to the other side of the table again where I’m asking for money, in some ways I found that freeing. Here, I get to actually design what I think needs to be developed and hopefully then I can find philanthropic partners who will appreciate the design and want to invest.

11 U.S. mayors commit to develop reparations pilot projects

  11 U.S. mayors commit to develop reparations pilot projects SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Eleven U.S. mayors — from Los Angeles to tiny Tullahassee, Oklahoma — have pledged to pay reparations for slavery to a small group of Black residents in their cities, saying their aim is to set an example for the federal government on how a nationwide program could work. The mayors had no details on how much it would cost, who would pay for it or how people would be chosen. All of those details would be worked out with the help of local commissions comprised of representatives from Black-led organizations set up to advise the mayor of each city. But the mayors say they are committed to paying reparations instead of just talking about them.

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Q: GEORGE FLOYD'S MURDER INSPIRED MANY TO INVEST WHAT THEY COULD FOR RACIAL JUSTICE, EVEN IF IT'S ONLY $20. WHAT SHOULD THEY DO WITH THAT DESIRE TO HELP?

A: I’m one who believes that last summer taught us something. Notwithstanding our many differences, there is still something that actually connects us to one another. George Floyd’s death reminded us that our inability to control what happens means that we’re all vulnerable. Going back to that $20 a person wants to give, that is the reminder that they’re connected. That’s the power and the future of American democracy — our ability to remind one another that we are connected and that democracy in all of its forms is pretty fragile. That $20 is a way to help shape that shared future.

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To hear Lewis speak at “America’s Racial Reckoning,” a free virtual event co-sponsored by Associated Press, the Chronicle of Philanthropy and The Conversation, register at http://bit.ly/ARRregister. The Associated Press receives support from the Lilly Endowment for coverage of philanthropy and nonprofits. The AP is solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s philanthropy coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/philanthropy.

George Floyd's family members to speak at Chauvin sentencing .
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — An attorney for George Floyd’s family said Friday that family members were feeling anxious ahead of a sentencing hearing for former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder and other charges in Floyd’s death on May 25, 2020, and he faces a practical maximum of 30 years when he’s sentenced Friday afternoon. Family attorney Ben Crump told The Associated Press that family members were feeling “anxious and tense.” Floyd’s brother Philonise, his brother Terrence and his nephew Brandon Williams plan to make victim impact statements at Chauvin's sentencing. “To us, George Floyd is a cause.

usr: 1
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