•   
  •   
  •   

Sport New Zealand PM Ardern backs weightlifter's selection for Olympics

06:25  22 june  2021
06:25  22 june  2021 Source:   reuters.com

NBCUniversal unveils plans for unprecedented 7,000 hours of Tokyo Olympics programming

  NBCUniversal unveils plans for unprecedented 7,000 hours of Tokyo Olympics programming The biggest media event ever, the Olympics will span two broadcast networks, six cable networks and multiple digital platforms. “After a devastating year, the world comes together again, finally, in Tokyo this summer,” Molly Solomon, Executive Producer and President, NBC Olympics Production, said in the release. “We are going to deliver the most comprehensive — and accessible — coverage for any sports event in history.  The depth and breadth of our broadcasts will be unprecedented, showcasing once-in-a-generation athletes and storylines that will capture the incredible uniqueness of these Games and our times.

New Zealand ' s Laurel Hubbard has become the first ever transgender athlete picked to compete at an Olympics , in a controversial decision. Officials have selected her for the women' s weightlifting team for Tokyo 2020, after qualifying requirements were recently modified. She had competed in men' s Last month, Belgian weightlifter Anna Vanbellinghen, who is competing in the same category, said that if Hubbard were to compete in Tokyo it would be unfair for women and "like a bad joke". She said that while she fully supported the transgender community, the principle of inclusion should not be "at the

The New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC) CEO Kereyn Smith said that Hubbard met the requirements to compete in the international games, and stressed that New Zealand ’ s team has a “strong culture of inclusion and respect for all.” One commentator claimed data suggests that “mediocre” male athletes would be champions if they were allowed to compete in female events, suggesting that Hubbard’ s selection was deeply unfair and undermines the integrity of women’ s sports.

(Removes 'HOLD' from headline)

a person holding a sign posing for the camera: FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: Laurel Hubbard of New Zealand competes at Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games © Reuters/PAUL CHILDS FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: Laurel Hubbard of New Zealand competes at Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games

WELLINGTON (Reuters) - New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on Tuesday defended the country's selection of weightlifter Laurel Hubbard for the Tokyo Olympics, a decision that has fuelled a debate over inclusion and fairness in sport.

Jacinda Ardern wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: FILE PHOTO: New Zealand Prime Minister Ardern participates in a debate in Auckland © Reuters/POOL New FILE PHOTO: New Zealand Prime Minister Ardern participates in a debate in Auckland

Hubbard will become the first transgender athlete to compete at the Games after she was selected by New Zealand's Olympics committee in the women's super-heavyweight 87+kg category.

Five Story Lines to Watch at U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials

  Five Story Lines to Watch at U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials Who fills the post-Phelps vacuum? Where will veteran leadership come from? Answering that and more ahead of swimming trials in Omaha. One of the most pressure-packed sporting events in the world begins Sunday. The U.S. Olympic Trials for swimming is a crucible like few others in athletics, with lifetime hopes and dreams fulfilled or dashed by hundredths of seconds. In no other country is the competition as fierce for two spots in each event, and nobody else stages its swim trials in a 17,000-seat basketball arena. It is a test that can fry even the strongest of minds.

A New Zealand woman has become the first transgender athlete to be selected to compete in the Olympics — a decision that is expected to launch debate about gender identity in sports. Weightlifter Laurel Hubbard, 43, who was born male but transitioned to female, was picked to participate in the Hubbard transitioned in her 30 s and had previously competed as a male weightlifter . She became eligible to lift in the Olympics as a woman after her testosterone levels dropped below a certain required threshold. “I am grateful and humbled by the kindness and support that has been given to me

WELLINGTON - Weightlifter Laurel Hubbard will become the first transgender athlete to compete at the Olympics after being selected by New Zealand for the women’ s event at the Tokyo Games, a decision set to fuel the debate over inclusion and fairness in sport. Hubbard will compete in the super-heavyweight 87-kg category, her selection made possible by updated qualifying requirements. The 43-year-old, who will be the oldest lifter at the Games, had competed in men' s weightlifting competitions before transitioning in 2013.

The 43-year-old's inclusion has been a divisive issue with her supporters welcoming the move while critics questioned the fairness of transgender athletes competing against women.

"Parties here have simply followed the rules. That's the case for Laurel but also the team in New Zealand - they have followed the rules," Ardern told reporters in Wellington.

"The alternative is to have someone who followed the rules but then is denied the ability to participate," she said.

"So, ultimately, I leave it to those bodies and that's the decision they have made and it's in keeping with the standard that has been set globally."

Hubbard, who at 43 will be the oldest lifter at the Games, had competed in men's weightlifting competitions before transitioning in 2013.

Jacinda Ardern Film Causes Backlash In New Zealand, Accusations of “White Saviorism”

  Jacinda Ardern Film Causes Backlash In New Zealand, Accusations of “White Saviorism” Plans for a film on New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s handling of the horrific Christchurch mosque shootings have been met with criticism in the country and accusations of “white saviorism.” On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter revealed that FilmNation Entertainment is bringing They Are Us to the Cannes Virtual Market later this month. The film, […]On Thursday, The Hollywood Reporter revealed that FilmNation Entertainment is bringing They Are Us to the Cannes Virtual Market later this month.

A weightlifter from New Zealand will become the first transgender athlete to compete at the Olympics , as women’ s sports grapple with a debate over the fairness of allowing biological males to compete against women. Laurel Hubbard, 43, was selected Monday to compete in the women’ s super-heavyweight category in Tokyo this summer, having competed in men’ s weightlifting competitions before transitioning in 2013. New Zealand Olympic Committee chief Kereyn Smith called Hubbard’ s selection a “historic moment in sport and for the New Zealand team.”

Following the selection announcement, Hubbard explained how grateful she is for the opportunity and support she has received -- especially after suffering a serious injury in 2018. "I am grateful and humbled by the kindness and support that has been given to me by so many New Zealanders," she said Belgian super-heavyweight weightlifter Anna Vanbellinghen, a rival of Hubbard, said earlier this year that while she supports the transgender community, she does not think it' s fair to have Hubbard compete. "Anyone that has trained weightlifting at a high level knows this to be true in their bones

She became eligible to compete at the Olympics as a woman when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) issued guidelines in late 2015 allowing any transgender athlete to do so, provided their testosterone levels were below 10 nanomoles per litre for at least 12 months before their first competition.

Revisions by the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) in May to its qualifying requirements - reducing the number of events contenders needed to participate in - put her in the frame for selection.

Some scientists have said the revised IOC guidelines on gender participation do little to mitigate the biological advantages of those who have gone through puberty as males.

(Reporting by Praveen Menon; editing by Jane Wardell)

Postcards from Tokyo: light and shadow ahead of pandemic Olympics .
US-OLYMPICS-2020-POSTCARDS-WIDER-IMAGE:Postcards from Tokyo: light and shadow ahead of pandemic Olympics © Reuters/KIM KYUNG-HOON The Wider Image: Postcards from Tokyo: light and sha By Maki Shiraki and Sakura Murakami © Reuters/KIM KYUNG-HOON The Wider Image: Postcards from Tokyo: light and sha TOKYO (Reuters) - The Tokyo Tower and other landmarks were lit in special Olympic colours in April to mark 100 days before the Summer Games opened, but were shrouded in clouds of mist when rain enveloped the Japanese capital t

usr: 0
This is interesting!