•   
  •   
  •   

Sport WADA to review cannabis' status as banned substance in wake of Sha'Carri Richardson's Olympic ban

08:10  15 september  2021
08:10  15 september  2021 Source:   sports.yahoo.com

Afghanistan flag held high during Paralympic Games, despite Afghan athletes pulling out

  Afghanistan flag held high during Paralympic Games, despite Afghan athletes pulling out Following the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan, athletes couldn't make the Paralympic Games. But Afghanistan's flag flew during the opening ceremony.International Paralympic Committee President Andrew Parsons confirmed NPC Afghanistan will not compete at the 2020 Paralympics. The news comes shortly after the mass evacuations in the country due to the Taliban seizing Kabul, the capital.

Just months after U.S. 100-meter champion Sha'Carri Richardson lost her spot at the Tokyo Olympics because of a positive cannabis test, the World Anti-Doping Agency made plans to review the drug's status as a banned substance.

WADA announced on Tuesday that an advisory group will conduct a scientific study to review whether marijuana should remain banned. The study will take place in 2022. The drug will remain on the banned substance list in the meantime.

"Following receipt of requests from a number of stakeholders, the (executive committee) endorsed the decision of the List Expert Advisory Group to initiate in 2022 a scientific review of the status of cannabis," a WADA statement reads, per AFP. "Cannabis is currently prohibited in competition and will continue to be in 2022."

Oscar Valdez's positive drug test exposes boxing's problematic anti-doping system

  Oscar Valdez's positive drug test exposes boxing's problematic anti-doping system If Oscar Valdez was in the UFC, despite his positive test for the medication phentermine, he’d be able to fight on Sept. 10 as planned against Robson Conceicao without issue. There is a major gap in the anti-doping system employed in boxing that makes it far easier for a boxer to use a banned substance, cycle off and yet still reap the benefits from it than there is for a UFC fighter. No drug testing system is 100 percent foolproof, but UFC fighters are subjected to drug tests 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. That’s not the case with boxers, and that’s where the gap exists.

a woman holding a sign: Will Sha'Carri Richardson's Olympic ban result in an overhaul of international cannabis regulations? (AP Photo/Ashley Landis) © Provided by Yahoo! Sports Will Sha'Carri Richardson's Olympic ban result in an overhaul of international cannabis regulations? (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

Richardson ban prompted calls for change

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency suspended Richardson from competition for one month starting June 28 following the revelation of her positive test, citing WADA regulations. It also stripped her of her 100-meter title at the U.S. Olympic Trials, prohibiting her from competing in the event in Tokyo. USA Track & Field ultimately left her off the Olympic roster rather than invite her to compete in the 4x100 relay, which took place after the completion of her suspension.

Richardson admitted to ingesting cannabis in the days leading up to the June 19 Olympic Trials. Her suspension drew widespread outrage and calls for a review of rules banning cannabis in international competition that came from as high as the White House and the USADA.

Critics argued that the drug is legal or decriminalized in multiple U.S. states and in countries around the world, and is not a performance enhancer. Richardson tested positive in Oregon, where cannabis is legal. USADA CEO Travis Tygart called Richardson's situation "heartbreaking" while noting that "the rules are clear."

Biles tells Congress 'enough is enough' after gymnast abuse .
WASHINGTON (AP) — Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles told Congress on Wednesday that “enough is enough” in emotional testimony along with other young gymnasts about her sexual abuse at the hands of USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar. Biles blamed not only the gymnastics organization but also federal law enforcement that “turned a blind eye” to the crimes as hundreds of young athletes were abused. “I blame Larry Nassar and I also blame an entire system that enabled and perpetrated his abuse,” Biles said through tears in her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

usr: 0
This is interesting!