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Sport Kishida vows to lead with 'trust and empathy' to fix Japan

09:25  08 october  2021
09:25  08 october  2021 Source:   msn.com

Fumio Kishida Is Set to Be Japan’s New Prime Minister. Here’s What to Expect From Him

  Fumio Kishida Is Set to Be Japan’s New Prime Minister. Here’s What to Expect From Him Kishida is a nine-term member of Japan's House of Representatives and was also a close aide of Shinzo Abe , Japan’s longest-serving prime minister, and was in charge of foreign affairs for more than four years under him.Although he has advocated continuing dialogue with China, Japan’s top trading partner, Kishida has promised to take a harder line militarily and supports boosting Tokyo’s defense budget amid increased Chinese activity near islands in the East China Sea that are claimed by both countries.

TOKYO (AP) — In his first policy speech Friday, Japan’s new Prime Minister Fumio Kishida promised to strengthen pandemic management and health care in case of another coronavirus resurgence, and turn around the battered economy while bolstering the country's defenses against threats from China and North Korea.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida prepares to deliver his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) © Provided by Associated Press Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida prepares to deliver his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

Tasked with a crucial mission of rallying public support ahead of national elections expected on Oct. 31, Kishida promised to pursue politics of “trust and empathy.”

Japan: Kishida, the change in continuity

 Japan: Kishida, the change in continuity © Ryohei Moriya / Yomiuri / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AFP of No bet on the end of the ABE line, named by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Recordman of the number of days spent at the head of Japan between 2007-2008 and 2012-2020. Well, they lost and it's not really a surprise, even if the media have arranged to make the opposite believe with opinion polls without real sense since the population has no voice in this election.

He was elected by parliament and sworn in Monday as Japan's 100th prime minister, succeeding Yoshihide Suga who left after only a year in office. Suga's perceived high-handed approach to virus measures and holding the Olympics despite rising cases angered the public and hurt the ruling Liberal Democrats.

“I will devote my body and soul to overcome the national crisis together with the people to pioneer the new era so that we can pass a bountiful Japan to the next generation,” said Kishida.

He promised to be more attentive to public concerns and needs, and prepare virus measures based on “a worst case scenario.” That includes taking advantage of a drop in infections to improve crisis management before the weather turns cold, approving COVID-19 treatment pills by the end of December and digitalize vaccine certificates for use at home as Japan gradually tries to expand social and economic activity, Kishida said.

Japan's Parliament set to formally choose Kishida as new PM

  Japan's Parliament set to formally choose Kishida as new PM TOKYO (AP) — Japan's Cabinet and leader Yoshihide Suga resigned Monday, paving the way for Parliament to elect Fumio Kishida as the new prime minister, who will tasked with quickly tackling the pandemic and security challenges before an imminent national election. Kishida replaced Suga as leader of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party last week and is certain to win the parliamentary vote for prime minister later Monday because the party and its coalition partner control both houses. He and his Cabinet will then be sworn in at a palace ceremony, replacing Suga's.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida arrives to deliver his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) © Provided by Associated Press Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida arrives to deliver his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

A former moderate who recently turned hawk on security issues, he said Japan should also increase preparedness for growing regional threats.

He said the security environment has become more severe, and that he would revise Japan’s national security and defense strategy to bolster missile defense capability and naval defense.

“I'm determined to defend our land, territorial seas and air space, and the people's lives and assets, no matter what,” Kishida said.

Japan-U.S. alliance remains as the “lynchpin” of diplomatic and security policies, he said, and vowed to further elevate the partnership, which "also serves the foundation of peace and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region and the entire world.”

Fumio Kishida takes office as Japan's new Prime Minister

  Fumio Kishida takes office as Japan's new Prime Minister Japan's Fumio Kishida took office as the country's new Prime Minister on Monday, tasked with leading the world's third-largest economy out of the coronavirus pandemic. © KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images Fumio Kishida is applauded after being elected as Japan's new Prime Minister at the lower house of parliament in Tokyo on October 4. Kishida, 64, who was elected leader of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) last week, was officially confirmed as the country's 100th Prime Minster following a parliamentary vote -- his elevation all but a given due to the LDP's majority in the lower house.

Kishida said “establishing a stable relationship with China is important not only for the two countries but also for the region and the international community.” Still, Japan, when necessary, will “speak up” against China’s unilateral and coercive activity in the region, while cooperating with other like-minded democracies.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, right, delivers his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) © Provided by Associated Press Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, right, delivers his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

China has become bolder in pursuing its territorial claims in the disputed South China Sea, where it constructed several man-made islands and turned them into military installations, as well as around the Japanese-controlled East China Sea island of Senkaku, which China also claims. Beijing also has escalated its military activities around self-ruled Taiwan, which it views as part of its territory.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida delivers his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) © Provided by Associated Press Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida delivers his first policy speech during an extraordinary Diet session at the lower house of parliament Friday, Oct. 8, 2021, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

North Korea’s missile and nuclear development cannot be tolerated, but Japan seeks to normalize diplomatic ties with Pyongyang by resolving the “unfortunate (wartime) past,” and the decades-old issue of Japanese citizens abducted to the North, Kishida said.

What to expect from Japan's new prime minister

  What to expect from Japan's new prime minister Fumio Kishida already has stressed the priority he will place on the U.S.-Japan alliance.Kishida, who was Japan's foreign minister when President Biden was vice president, is expected to be warmly welcomed in Washington. Many of his policies will be similar to his predecessors who have invested significantly in building a stronger U.S.-Japan alliance. The relationship between Washington and Tokyo is becoming ever more important to meet today's challenges.

Kishida repeated that he is ready to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un toward making a breakthrough.

Kishida repeated his policy goals made during the recent governing party leadership race, and pledged to achieve “a positive cycle of growth and distribution” in a society that balances daily lives and the danger of the coronavirus.

He said he seeks to promote growth by investment into cutting-edge research and development and promoting digitalization to modernize bureaucracy, services and industries, while encouraging companies to hike wages. He also wants to step up government support for education and living costs. Many experts, however, are skeptical if income raise could be possible.

Kishida said he hopes to close divisions caused by the pandemic that has worsened gaps between the rich and the poor.

New Prime Minister Fumio Kishida Promises a 'New Capitalism' for Japan. Will It Succeed? .
Japan's new leader promises to repudiate Abenomics with a “new form of Japanese capitalism.” How far will reforms go?But the “new form of Japanese capitalism” advocated by the softly spoken Kishida—a former foreign minister with a reputation as a consensus builder—spooked Tokyo investors wary of higher taxes and prompted markets to plunge. In response, the 64-year-old chosen to lead the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), following last month’s resignation of Yoshihide Suga, insisted that he wasn’t planning on raising capital gains tax anytime soon.

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