•   
  •   
  •   

US Climate, Technology, Trust: Ways to Help Students Report Threats to Their School

14:21  27 september  2022
14:21  27 september  2022 Source:   the74million.org

25 years after Kentucky school shooting, a chance at parole

  25 years after Kentucky school shooting, a chance at parole When 14-year-old Michael Carneal opened fire on his fellow students during a before-school prayer meeting in 1997, school shootings were not yet a part of the national consciousness. The carnage that left three students dead and five more injured at Heath High School, near Paducah, Kentucky, ended when Carneal put down his weapon and the principal walked him to the school office — a scene that seems unimaginable today. Also stretching today'sAlso stretching today's imagination — Carneal's life sentence guaranteed an opportunity for parole after 25 years, the maximum sentence permissible at the time given his age.

The horrific shooting that killed 19 children and two of their teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, in May has rekindled conversations about school safety and security. Discussions and debates have emerged around physical security improvements, arming teachers, and other issues. In June, Congress passed the Safer Communities Act, which provides $300 million in extra funding to support school safety. But some experts argue that schools already doubled down on physical security in the wake of earlier mass shootings, and what is needed now is a stronger focus on the human dimension.

  Climate, Technology, Trust: Ways to Help Students Report Threats to Their School © Provided by The 74

Indeed, what may be especially important is ensuring that students and other community members feel safe coming forward with information about a threat before tragedy strikes.

Schools across US hit with dozens of false shooting, bomb threats. Experts say it's a 'cruel hoax'

  Schools across US hit with dozens of false shooting, bomb threats. Experts say it's a 'cruel hoax' Authorities haven't said whether the wave of school threats are related, but experts say these intentional false reports can have serious consequences for students, teachers and others, as well as first responders, and can be prosecuted as a crime," said Laura Eimiller, a spokesperson for the FBI's Los Angeles field office.

When students or others don’t know how to report or aren’t willing to do so, important opportunities to protect students may be missed. In a 2021 study of averted attacks on K-12 schools, the Secret Service found that over 90% of would-be assailants shared their intention or desire to do harm, most often to their peers. Another study found that about half of school shooters gave a warning before they acted, but most went unrecognized and unreported.

Sign up here for The 74’s daily newsletter. Donate here to support The 74's independent journalism.

Schools receive comparatively little guidance about how to implement an effective reporting program or how to build a robust reporting culture. Differences in school climate, student demographics or police-community trust can all affect whether students or members of a school’s wider community will report potential threats. This means some approaches will work better for some schools than others, and school leaders are challenged to identify those that will best meet their community’s needs.

Stressed out schools: How parents and teachers choices are changing education

  Stressed out schools: How parents and teachers choices are changing education Teacher shortages, parents looking at other ways to educate their kids other than public education. James Brown looks into what is going on in schools?How are schools across the nation faring now that school is back in session? Is life in school back to normal or are there still looming effects caused by the pandemic? We've all heard of teacher and staff shortages and parents pulling kids from public school because of curriculum issues. It seems, schools are stressed.

Related: School Chiefs’ POV: Arming Teachers & ‘Hardening’ Schools Reckless, Toxic Ideas

A recent research effort helps to fill this gap, highlighting seven key implications for school safety planning.

A trusting school climate where students and staff have strong relationships promotes and encourages reporting. Though the focus often is on fortifying schools with physical safety measures after tragedies, a strong school community where everyone is invested in its protection can be a robust protective measure. Positive school climates where students and staff value and respect reporting, and where students see adults as trusted individuals, can help to prevent school violence.

Give students multiple ways to report. School safety tip lines such as Safe2Tell Colorado, Safe2Say Pennsylvania, SafeOregon, and OK2Say Michigan, offer multiple methods for submitting reports: via mobile apps, online, phone and text message. Students who are used to communicating virtually may prefer to submit tips that way; phone or email options can support other community members, like parents.

Virginia superintendent says new accreditation ratings 'masks' impact of school closures

  Virginia superintendent says new accreditation ratings 'masks' impact of school closures Virginia education leader questioned the state's accreditation standards as being an "unreliable" measure of how schools are faring after COVID-19 closures.The academic levels in Virginia schools dropped starkly in some subjects in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, yet 89 percent of schools still earned full accreditation for 2022-2023, according to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE), only a 3 percent drop from the 2019-2020 school year.

Students are often more comfortable submitting anonymous or confidential reports. A common fear among students is that reporting equals snitching, and concern about being ostracized by peers often prevents them from coming forward. Many school districts give students the option of submitting a report without revealing their identity. Confidential reporting programs collect information about individuals submitting a tip, but keep that information private. Students should be made aware of these options, and when their identity might be revealed.

EMBED: https://www.the74million.org/article/poll-most-parents-oppose-arming-teachers-with-guns-but-support-is-growing/

Who receives the report matters. Many state- and district-level school safety tip lines recognize that not everyone is comfortable speaking directly with law enforcement. Some programs employ trained crisis counselors to interact in real time with students and others submitting a tip. This has proven especially valuable for reporting threats of self-harm, where students might be hesitant to call 911 – and police might not be well positioned to respond if they did.

Virginia Students Walk Out, A Politician Comes Out, JK Rowling Is Angry, and More: This Week in Queer News

  Virginia Students Walk Out, A Politician Comes Out, JK Rowling Is Angry, and More: This Week in Queer News People want to keep talk of gender and sexuality out of schools — unless it's a smear campaign against queerness.But beyond electoral politics, this is a time to reflect on the many ways that queer people’s lives have been politicized to the point that bad-faith actors are interceding in strange and insidious new ways. For instance, while many school districts may say they don’t want talk of sexuality in schools, one school district in Louisiana bussed a group of students to an anti-LGBTQ+ lecture under the guise of a “career fair.” It seems that talking about sexuality and gender is just fine when it’s a smear campaign, and neither honest nor nurturing.

Teach everyone what and how to report. People who know how to recognize warning signs, what to report and how to do so are more likely to come forward. Programs like Sandy Hook Promise’s Say Something Anonymous Reporting System provide training and marketing materials for schools to use. Some states have ambassador programs to engage students in promoting reporting among their peers.

Students and others are more likely to report when they know how schools will act on their information.Transparency about how a school or district has responded to past tips can help to build trust in the reporting system and help to address concerns about reports triggering police involvement rather than school intervention.

Related: Analysis: School Safety Is About More Than Keeping Guns Out of the Classroom

Everyone should be encouraged to participate, including schools, teachers and other staff. Though school leaders and teachers are central to safety efforts, all adults can play a role in preventing school violence. A student who is uncomfortable talking with the principal about a potential threat might be willing to speak with the school librarian or another trusted staff member. Gaining the buy-in of all staff is critical to demonstrating the importance of reporting, ensuring the sustainability of a reporting program and strengthening school climate.

Surviving Genocide: Native Boarding School Archives Reveal Defiance, Loss & Love .
It is a desperate plea from a father seeking information about his missing son. Morris Jenis Jr.’s father knew only his son, a Native American student at the Genoa Indian School on the Pawnee Reservation in Nebraska 100 years ago, had not been seen in a year. Morris ran away from the school in 1921 […]Morris Jenis Jr.’s father knew only his son, a Native American student at the Genoa Indian School on the Pawnee Reservation in Nebraska 100 years ago, had not been seen in a year.

usr: 0
This is interesting!