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US Hawaii officials say ‘NO missile threat’ amid emergency alerts

22:06  13 january  2018
22:06  13 january  2018 Source:   msn.com

Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile

  Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile Hawaii officials on Saturday announced that an alert saying a missile was headed for the state was a false alarm.Sen. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) issued a tweet, saying she had confirmed with officials the alert was false.

Emergency alerts sent to the cellphones of Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a "ballistic missile threat " were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake, officials said . "USPACOM has detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii ," Cmdr.

Emergency alerts sent Saturday to Hawaiians warning of a “ballistic missile threat ” were reportedly false, officials said . Less than two months ago, Hawaii reinstated its Cold War-era nuclear warning sirens amid growing fears of an attack by North Korea.

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Emergency alerts sent to the cellphones of Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a “ballistic missile threat” were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake, officials said.

Shortly after 8 a.m. local time Saturday, several alarmed Hawaii residents began posting screenshots of alerts they had received, reading: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Ex-Obama defense official on Hawaii false alarm: 'Thank God the President was playing golf'

  Ex-Obama defense official on Hawaii false alarm: 'Thank God the President was playing golf' A former Defense Department official under former President Barack Obama reacted to the false alarm of a ballistic missile headed towards Hawaii on Saturday.Patrick Granfield, a former strategic communications director at the Pentagon, posted the tweet after Hawaii officials declared the emergency alert was a false alarm.

Emergency alerts sent to Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a “ballistic missile threat ” were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake, officials said . Less than two months ago, Hawaii reinstated its Cold War-era nuclear warning sirens amid growing fears of an attack by North Korea.

This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii . (Matthew Nelson/The Washington Post).

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted at 8:20 a.m. local time that there was no missile threat to the state.

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The U.S. Navy also confirmed in an email the emergency alerts had been sent in error.

“USPACOM has detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii,” Cmdr. Dave Benham, a spokesman for U.S. Pacific Command, said in an email. “Earlier message was sent in error. State of Hawaii will send out a correction message as soon as possible.”

a close up of a sign: This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii.© Matthew Nelson/The Washington Post/ This alert was sent to phones in Hawaii. At 8:45 a.m. local time, an additional alert was sent to Hawaii residents advising them that the first warning had been a false alarm.

Panic in the Pacific: How those in Hawaii reacted to missile threat

  Panic in the Pacific: How those in Hawaii reacted to missile threat Scenes of panic and worry played out across Hawaii Saturday as many residents and visitors to the islands tried to determine if the threat was genuine.Ben DuPree spent the morning of his daughter's second birthday cowering with his family in a bathtub in Kailua, Hawaii, fearing an incoming missile strike from North Korea.

Jump to navigation Jump to search. On January 13, 2018, a false ballistic missile alert was issued via the Emergency Alert System and Commercial Mobile Alert System over television, radio, and cellphones in the U.S. state of Hawaii .

Hawaii emergency officials confirmed Saturday that an alert warning that a ballistic missile was inbound to the island was a mistake.

“There is no missile threat or danger to the State of Hawaii,” the follow-up alert read, according to screenshots of the message. “Repeat. False Alarm.”

It is unclear how or why the initial alert was sent out, and how many people received it. What was clear was that the first message caused a brief panic, at least on social media, among those who read it and expected the worst.

On CNN, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) said she received the alert, called Hawaii officials and confirmed it was “an inadvertent message that was sent out.”

“You can only imagine what kicked in,” Gabbard told CNN. “This is a real threat facing Hawaii, so people got this message on their phones and they thought, 15 minutes, we have 15 minutes before me and my family could be dead.”

Less than two months ago, Hawaii reinstated its Cold War-era nuclear warning sirens amid growing fears of an attack by North Korea. Tests of the sirens were scheduled to be conducted on the first business day of every month for the foreseeable future.

Here's how emergency alerts are supposed to happen

  Here's how emergency alerts are supposed to happen The false alarm of a missile heading for Hawaii left Americans wondering how the missile detection and emergency messaging systems are supposed to work -- and what went wrong. The US military is in charge of detecting ballistic missile launches and maintains a complex and integrated network of sensors and detection capabilities in the Pacific to follow missile activity, a network that has been improved in recent years. Missile launches are detected immediately by satellites that notice the infrared signature on the launchpad. The detection triggers an instant Strategic Command, or STRATCOM, assessment process.

Hawaii emergency officials confirmed Saturday that an alert warning that a ballistic missile was inbound to the island was a mistake.

" Emergency alerts sent to the cellphones of Hawaii residents Saturday warning of a “ballistic missile threat ” were a false alarm reportedly sent by mistake

The tests were an audible example of the growing strife with North Korea, which has spooked other communities in the still-hypothetical line of fire. Guam distributed a pamphlet on nuclear attack preparedness that encouraged people to avoid using conditioner, “as it will bind the toxins to your hair.” A 16-page bulletin released by emergency management authorities in California warned people to beware of radioactive pets.

Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), acknowledging the heightened tensions, admonished the wayward message and vowed to investigate how it occurred.

“At a time of heightened tensions, we need to make sure all information released to community is accurate,” Hirono tweeted Saturday. “We need to get to the bottom of what happened and make sure it never happens again.”

Even as information was scarce, there were calls on Twitter for anyone who was responsible for sending the message in error to be held accountable.

Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) said the false alarm was based on “a human error.”

“There is nothing more important to Hawai’i than professionalizing and fool-proofing this process,” Schatz tweeted Saturday.

He added in a subsequent tweet: “What happened today is totally inexcusable. The whole state was terrified. There needs to be tough and quick accountability and a fixed process.”

Paul Kane, Brittany Lyte and Cleve R. Wootson Jr. contributed to this article.

Hawaii governor didn't correct false missile alert sooner because he didn't know his Twitter password .
Gov. David Ige said he has taken steps to ensure it won't happen again.But one Twitter account was deafeningly silent for 17 minutes: that of Hawaii Gov. David Ige. Though Ige was informed by the state’s adjutant general that the alert was false two minutes after it was sent, he waited until 8:24 a.m. to tweet, “There is NO missile threat.

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