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US Hawaii governor didn't correct false missile alert sooner because he didn't know his Twitter password

13:31  23 january  2018
13:31  23 january  2018 Source:   msn.com

Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile

  Hawaii officials say 'false alarm' on alert about inbound ballistic missile Hawaii officials on Saturday announced that an alert saying a missile was headed for the state was a false alarm.Sen. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) issued a tweet, saying she had confirmed with officials the alert was false.

Missile Alert Sooner Because He Didn ' t Know His Twitter Password (washingtonpost.com) Though Ige was informed by the state 's adjutant general that the alert was false two minutes after it On Monday, after he gave the State of the State address in which he avoided the subject of the

He also didn ’ t post a correction to Facebook until 23 minutes after the alert went out. “I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team The missile alert fiasco highlighted flaws both human and technological in the state ’s civil defense warning system. The false alert was sent out because

a screen shot of David Ige: Hawaii Gov. David Ige answers questions during a hearing in Honolulu on Jan. 19. © Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP/ Hawaii Gov. David Ige answers questions during a hearing in Honolulu on Jan. 19.

Minutes after the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency mistakenly sent a missile alert at 8:07 a.m. on Jan. 13 — terrifying residents and visitors across the state — some officials, such as Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), rushed to Twitter to reassure everyone it was a mistake.

But one Twitter account was deafeningly silent for 17 minutes: that of Hawaii Gov. David Ige. Though Ige was informed by the state’s adjutant general that the alert was false two minutes after it was sent, he waited until 8:24 a.m. to tweet, “There is NO missile threat.”

Ex-Obama defense official on Hawaii false alarm: 'Thank God the President was playing golf'

  Ex-Obama defense official on Hawaii false alarm: 'Thank God the President was playing golf' A former Defense Department official under former President Barack Obama reacted to the false alarm of a ballistic missile headed towards Hawaii on Saturday.Patrick Granfield, a former strategic communications director at the Pentagon, posted the tweet after Hawaii officials declared the emergency alert was a false alarm.

He didn ’ t mention whether he knows his Facebook login information. “I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team both in Hawaii Emergency The false missile alert highlighted flaws both human and technological in the state ’s civil defense warning system. The alert was sent out because

Story highlights. A false alert about a ballistic missile threat went out January 13 in Hawaii . It took 15 minutes to relay news of false alert on social media. "I have to confess that I don' t know my Twitter account login and passwords ," Ige told reporters Monday after giving his State of the State address.

On Monday, after he gave the State of the State address in which he avoided the subject of the missile alert fiasco, reporters demanded an explanation for that long silence.

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Ige’s answer: he couldn’t log into Twitter.

“I have to confess that I don’t know my Twitter account log-ons and the passwords, so certainly that’s one of the changes that I’ve made,” Ige said.

He also didn’t post a correction to Facebook until 23 minutes after the alert went out, though he didn’t mention if he knows his Facebook login information.

“I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team both in Hawaii Emergency Management as well as others,” he added. “The focus really was on trying to get as many people informed about the fact that it was a false alert.”

Honolulu's 911 system overwhelmed with calls; body found at airport

  Honolulu's 911 system overwhelmed with calls; body found at airport Honolulu’s 911 system was inundated with more than 5,000 telephone calls Saturday as Hawaii plummeted into a state of panic and confusion over a false ballistic missile scare. About half of those callers were unable to get through, but operators were planning to get back to them to ensure that no actual emergencies were happening, Honolulu Police Chief Susan Ballard told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.Mayor Kirk Caldwell said there were no reported injuries or accidents related to the panic and confusion that ensued, the paper reported.Within minutes of the alert, police were notified that it was indeed false.

He also didn ’ t post a correction to Facebook until 23 minutes after the alert went out. “I was in the process of making calls to the leadership team The missile alert fiasco highlighted flaws both human and technological in the state ’s civil defence warning system. The false alert was sent out because

Remember me · Forgot password ? New to Twitter ? When you see a Tweet you love, tap the heart — it lets the person who wrote it know you shared the love. Call a tv station. Go outside and yell, on the public square. Doesn’t he have a staff? why didn ' t the agency, who sent the false alert , sent a correction ?

The state itself did not issue an official correction until 38 minutes after the errant warning went out.

Ige said he has taken steps to ensure it won’t happen again. Namely, he saved his Twitter information on his cellphone.

“I’ve been putting that on my phone so that we can access the social media directly,” Ige said.

a screen shot of David Ige: Hawaii Gov. David Ige answers questions during a hearing in Honolulu on Jan. 19. © Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP/ Hawaii Gov. David Ige answers questions during a hearing in Honolulu on Jan. 19. a screenshot of a cell phone © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

The missile alert fiasco highlighted flaws both human and technological in the state’s civil defense warning system. The false alert was sent out because an employee clicked on the wrong option on an old-fashioned drop-down menu of links. As The Washington Post’s Fred Barbash reported:

The menu, which triggers alerts, contains a jumble of options, ranging from Amber alerts to Tsunami warnings to road closures. Some of them, such as “High Surf Warning North Shores,” are in plain English.
Others, including the one for a missile attack, “PACOM (CDW)-STATE ONLY,” use shorthand initials. (PACOM refers to the United States Pacific Command based in Hawaii.)
And the menu contained no ballistic missile defense false alarm option — which has now been added.

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Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii .
HONOLULU — Hawaii's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic.Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi stepped down Tuesday, state Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Joe Logan said. A second agency worker quit before disciplinary action was taken and another was being suspended without pay, Logan said in announcing results of an internal investigation.

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