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US Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii

03:50  31 january  2018
03:50  31 january  2018 Source:   ap.org

Hawaii governor didn't correct false missile alert sooner because he didn't know his Twitter password

  Hawaii governor didn't correct false missile alert sooner because he didn't know his Twitter password Gov. David Ige said he has taken steps to ensure it won't happen again.But one Twitter account was deafeningly silent for 17 minutes: that of Hawaii Gov. David Ige. Though Ige was informed by the state’s adjutant general that the alert was false two minutes after it was sent, he waited until 8:24 a.m. to tweet, “There is NO missile threat.

On Saturday morning, January 13, 2018, a ballistic missile alert was issued via the Emergency Alert System and Commercial Mobile Alert System over television, radio

HONOLULU — Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic. Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2017 file photo, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency officials work at the department's command center in Honolulu. A Hawaii employee who mistakenly sent an alert warning of an incoming ballistic missile earlier this month, creating a panic across the state, thought an actual attack was imminent, the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2017 file photo, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency officials work at the department's command center in Honolulu. A Hawaii employee who mistakenly sent an alert warning of an incoming ballistic missile earlier this month, creating a panic across the state, thought an actual attack was imminent, the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)

HONOLULU — Hawaii's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic.

Employee Who Sent False Hawaii Missile Alert Is Refusing to Cooperate With FCC Investigation

  Employee Who Sent False Hawaii Missile Alert Is Refusing to Cooperate With FCC Investigation The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency employee who sent a false alert about an incoming ballistic missile earlier this month has refused to cooperate with a Federal Communications Commission investigation, an FCC official said Thursday. Lisa Fowlkes, chief of the FCC’s public safety and homeland security bureau, said she was “disappointed” during a hearing with the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. “We are quite pleased with the level of cooperation we have received from the leadership of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency thus far. We are disappointed, however, that one key employee, the person who transmitted the false alert, is refusing to cooperate with our investigation,” Fowlkes said on Thursday. “We hope that person will reconsider.

Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent the false ballistic missile alert has been fired.

HONOLULU — Hawaii ’s emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, after the mistake caused widespread panic earlier this month. Hawaii Emergency Management Agency

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi stepped down Tuesday, state Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Joe Logan said. A second agency worker quit before disciplinary action was taken and another was being suspended without pay, Logan said in announcing results of an internal investigation.

The fallout came the same day the Federal Communications Commission revealed that the worker who pushed out the alert thought an actual attack was imminent. It was the first indication the Jan. 13 alert was purposely sent, adding another level of confusion to the misstep that left residents and tourists believing their lives were about to end.

The state emergency agency worker believed the attack was real because of a mistake in how the drill was initiated during a shift change, the FCC said in a report. The worker said he didn't hear the word "exercise" repeated six times even though others clearly heard it.

Hawaii to release report on false missile alarm

  Hawaii to release report on false missile alarm Hawaii officials have concluded their internal investigation into the false alert that told residents that a ballistic missile was speeding toward the state earlier this month. Hawaii Gov. David Ige along with other officials will release the results from the internal investigation at a Tuesday press conference.

Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, after the mistake caused widespread panic earlier this month.

Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi stepped down Tuesday, state Adjutant General Maj.

There was no requirement to double-check with a colleague or get a supervisor's approval before sending the blast to cellphones, TV and radio stations statewide, the agency said.

"There were no procedures in place to prevent a single person from mistakenly sending a missile alert" in Hawaii, said James Wiley, a cybersecurity and communications reliability staffer at the FCC.

The worker, who was fired Friday and whose name has not been revealed, has confused real-life events and drills in the past, the state said in a report. His poor performance has been documented for years, and other members of the team say they were not comfortable working with him in any role.

The employee heard a recorded message that began by saying "exercise, exercise, exercise" — the script for a drill, the FCC said. Then the recording used language that is typically used for a real threat, not a drill: "this is not a drill." The recording ended by saying "exercise, exercise, exercise."

Here's what went wrong with the Hawaii false alarm

  Here's what went wrong with the Hawaii false alarm A combination of human error and lacking enough safeguards led to a false ballistic missile alert and the delay to correct it in Hawaii earlier this month.Investigations conducted internally and by the Federal Communications Commission have been digging into what led to the false ballistic missile alert earlier this month. So far, they say it's a combination of factors that involves human error and lack of safeguards.

Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic. Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi

Hawaii officials have concluded their internal investigation into the false alert that told residents that a ballistic missile was speeding toward the state HONOLULU - Hawaii 's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic

Once the employee sent the false alert, he was directed to send a cancel message but instead "just sat there and didn't respond," according to the state's report on its internal investigation. Later, another employee took over the computer and sent the correction because the worker "seemed confused."

Compounding the issues was that the agency lacked any preparation in how to correct the false alert. The federal agency, which regulates the nation's airwaves and sets standards for such emergency alerts, criticized the state's delay in correcting it.

In addition, software at Hawaii's emergency agency used the same prompts for both test and actual alerts, and it generally used prepared text that made it easy for a staffer to click through the alerting process without focusing enough on the text of the warning that would be sent.

The FCC said the state Emergency Management Agency has already taken steps to try to avoid a repeat of the false alert, requiring more supervision of drills and alert and test-alert transmissions. It has created a correction template for false alerts and has stopped ballistic missile defense drills until its own investigation is done.

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AP Technology Writer Tali Arbel contributed to this report from New York.

Hawaii man wants people to know he didn't send missile alert .
HONOLULU — When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile, Jeffrey Wong was an island away from the state's emergency management agency office where he works as an operations officer.Wong helped gather hundreds of panicked guests at his hotel on the island of Kauai to seek shelter in a restaurant until he confirmed the alert was a mistake.Then an Associated Press photograph circulated picturing Wong months earlier at the agency'sWong helped gather hundreds of panicked guests at his hotel on the island of Kauai to seek shelter in a restaurant until he confirmed the alert was a mistake.

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