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US Hawaii man wants people to know he didn't send missile alert

03:11  07 february  2018
03:11  07 february  2018 Source:   ap.org

Hawaii to release report on false missile alarm

  Hawaii to release report on false missile alarm Hawaii officials have concluded their internal investigation into the false alert that told residents that a ballistic missile was speeding toward the state earlier this month. Hawaii Gov. David Ige along with other officials will release the results from the internal investigation at a Tuesday press conference.

Wong said he wanted to set the record straight so the public knows he didn ' t send out the alert . The employee who did has been fired. The AP took the photo in July 2017 to accompany a story about Hawaii preparing for a North Korean missile threat. The news agency did not resend it after the false

On Saturday morning, January 13, 2018, a ballistic missile alert was issued via the Emergency Alert System and Commercial Mobile Alert System over television, radio

HONOLULU — When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile, Jeffrey Wong was an island away from the state's emergency management agency office where he works as an operations officer.

Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii

  Top official resigns after false missile alert in Hawaii HONOLULU — Hawaii's emergency management leader has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic.Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi stepped down Tuesday, state Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Joe Logan said. A second agency worker quit before disciplinary action was taken and another was being suspended without pay, Logan said in announcing results of an internal investigation.

When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile , Jeffrey He said the former employee's supervisor does report to him . The AP took the photo in July 2017 to accompany a story about Hawaii preparing for a North Korean missile threat.

HONOLULU (AP) — When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile , Jeffrey Wong was an island away

Wong helped gather hundreds of panicked guests at his hotel on the island of Kauai to seek shelter in a restaurant until he confirmed the alert was a mistake.

Then an Associated Press photograph circulated picturing Wong months earlier at the agency's Honolulu operations center on Oahu island — and people mistakenly thought Wong was the "button-pusher" who sent out the alert, wrongly accusing him in online comments of causing widespread panic and confusion.

Wong told The Associated Press last week he quickly learned how cruel the internet can be: "A lot of anger, a lot of ignorance came out as a result of that."

He added: "It's very hurtful to be wrongly accused, wrongly marked as an individual that's responsible for actions that affected, in a negative way, a lot of people within the state of Hawaii and possibly around the world."

Here's what went wrong with the Hawaii false alarm

  Here's what went wrong with the Hawaii false alarm A combination of human error and lacking enough safeguards led to a false ballistic missile alert and the delay to correct it in Hawaii earlier this month.Investigations conducted internally and by the Federal Communications Commission have been digging into what led to the false ballistic missile alert earlier this month. So far, they say it's a combination of factors that involves human error and lack of safeguards.

Wong said he wanted to set the record straight so the public knows he didn ' t send out the alert . The employee who did has been fired. The AP took the photo in July 2017 to accompany a story about Hawaii preparing for a North Korean missile threat. The news agency did not resend it after the false

When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile , Jeffrey Wong was an island away from the state ’s emergency management agency office where he works as an operations officer.

FILE - In this July 21, 2017 file photo, Jeffrey Wong, the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency's operations officer, shows computer screens monitoring hazards at the agency's headquarters in Honolulu. The photo originally accompanied an Associated Press story in July about Hawaii preparing for a missile threat from North Korea. Some online news organizations used the AP photo in their coverage of the Jan. 13, 2018 false missile alert in Hawaii, leading some people to believe Wong was the person who sent the false alert. The AP did not use the image in coverage of the false alert. Wong says he has received threats and harassment because of the use of the image online. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this July 21, 2017 file photo, Jeffrey Wong, the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency's operations officer, shows computer screens monitoring hazards at the agency's headquarters in Honolulu. The photo originally accompanied an Associated Press story in July about Hawaii preparing for a missile threat from North Korea. Some online news organizations used the AP photo in their coverage of the Jan. 13, 2018 false missile alert in Hawaii, leading some people to believe Wong was the person who sent the false alert. The AP did not use the image in coverage of the false alert. Wong says he has received threats and harassment because of the use of the image online. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher, File)

Wong said he wanted to set the record straight so the public knows he didn't send out the alert. The employee who did has been fired. That man, who spoke to reporters separately on the condition that his name not be revealed, said he was devastated for causing panic but believed at it was a real attack at the time.

Test of US-Japanese missile interceptor fails again

  Test of US-Japanese missile interceptor fails again A test of a US missile interceptor failed in Hawaii on Wednesday, a defense official said, marking the second such unsuccessful attempt in less than a year. The test using the Aegis Ashore system occurred at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on the island of Kauai, Missile Defense Agency spokesman Mark Wright said in a statement. Wright said the test was of an SM-3 Block IIA missile, made by arms giant Raytheon and designed to intercept intermediate-range ballistic missiles.A defense official told AFP the test was a failure and investigators have opened a probe.

By. AP. Published Wednesday, February 07, 2018. When an erroneous alert was sent out last month telling people in Hawaii that there was an incoming ballistic missile , Jeffrey Wong was an island away from the state 's emergency management agency office where he works as an operations officer.

13, 2018 false missile alert in Hawaii , leading some people to believe Wong was the person who sent the false alert . The AP did not use the image in coverage of the false alert . Wong says he has received threats and harassment because of the use of the image online. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher

Wong, who oversees day-to-day operations at the agency, said he neither hired the other man nor did the man report directly to him. He said the former employee's supervisor does report to him.

The AP took the photo in July 2017 to accompany a story about Hawaii preparing for a North Korean missile threat. The news agency did not resend it after the false missile alert, but people found it online and recirculated it on social media.

Some of their comments called for Wong to be shot and water-boarded and there were also racially derogatory comments with some people questioning his loyalty to Hawaii and the U.S., he said.

The photo also included a yellow sticky note in the background that appeared to have a password on it, which people circulating the photo after the false alert pointed out as a reason to criticize the emergency management agency — prompting even more online rage.

Fearing for his safety, Wong took screen-shots and print-outs to Honolulu police and filed a police report four days after the Jan. 13 false alert. Authorities are conducting a first-degree terroristic threatening and harassment investigation, said police spokeswoman Michelle Yu.

While Wong has been overwhelmed by the criticism he has endured, guests at the hotel where he was attending a civil air patrol conference praised his efforts to keep them safe.

"We appreciate your actions greatly and are grateful that you happened to be there and showed yourself to be strong, calm and positive," Marc Tiar, who was vacationing with his family, wrote in an email to Wong after returning home to Nevada. "We are safe at home in Reno now, but my family and I will never forget that day or the man who made sure we would be as safe as possible."

Top admiral: US must bolster missile defense to counter North Korea .
The top U.S. admiral in the Asia-Pacific region said Wednesday that projections of North Korea's weapons capabilities in a few years mean the United States must bolster its missile defenses, particularly on Hawaii. "I do believe that we have that capability today in 2018," Adm. Harry Harris, commander of U.S. Pacific Command, told the House Armed Services Committee, when asked about missile defense protecting the homeland. "But given where we think, without going into classified subjects, but given where we think the North Korean capability might be in terms of their missiles in three or four years or in the early 2020s, I think we must continue to impro

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