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US A Texas school superintendent threatens to suspend students protesting gun laws. But that’s not legal.

06:42  22 february  2018
06:42  22 february  2018 Source:   msn.com

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A superintendent threatens to suspend students protesting gun laws . But that ’ s not legal . The superintendent of a Texas public school district is drawing harsh criticism after issuing a written threat Tuesday to suspend any students who take part in demonstrations about gun violence after the

A superintendent in a Texas school district is warning that students will be suspended if they cause any disruptions to protest gun violence. Needville Independent School District (ISD) Superintendent Curtis Rhodes said in a letter that was sent to families and posted on social media

Students participate in a protest against gun violence February 21, 2018 outside the White House in Washington, DC. © Alex Wong/Getty Images Students participate in a protest against gun violence February 21, 2018 outside the White House in Washington, DC. The superintendent of a Texas public school district is drawing harsh criticism after issuing a written threat Tuesday to suspend any students who take part in demonstrations about gun violence after the school shooting in Florida last week.

Curtis Rhodes, the superintendent of the school district in Needville, a small town southwest of Houston, wrote a letter to students and parents that was distributed on the social media page for the town’s high school on Tuesday. It began with a reference to the protests that have been sparked around the country after the horrific shooting left 17 people dead.

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A Texas school district superintendent has threatened to suspend students who join any organized walkouts or protests in the wake of the mass shooting in Rhodes said he was sensitive to violence in schools but that administrators would discipline students , whether it was “one, fifty, or five hundred

Texas School Threatens to Suspend Any Students Who Leave Class to Protest . “Please be advised that the Needville ISD will not allow a student demonstration during school hours for The school ’ s Facebook page has since been taken down. TIME reached out to Superintendent Rhodes

“Please be advised that the Needville ISD will not allow a student demonstration during school hours for any type of protest or awareness!!” Rhodes wrote. “Should students choose to do so, they will be suspended from school for 3 days and face all the consequences that come along with an out of school suspension. Life is all about choices and every choice has a consequence whether it be positive or negative. We will discipline no matter if it is one, fifty, or five hundred students involved.”

Rhodes, a registered Republican according to public records, said parental notes would make no difference.

“Respect yourself,” Rhodes wrote, “and please understand that we are here for an education and not a political protest.”

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A Texas school district has threatened to suspend any of its students who stage walk out or cause other disruption in order to protest gun laws According to The Houston Chronicle, Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes sent a letter out to all parents in the school district warning them that

— -- A school superintendent near Houston said his district plans to suspend any student who takes part in classroom walkouts as a form of protest over gun violence after last Rhodes went on to say that students participating in “political protest ” would be subject to a three-day suspension and that

The move touched off outcry as an emotional protest in Florida organized by student activists from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School calling for elected officials to do something to curb gun violence has captivated the nation’s attention. And it comes as schools around the country are having difficult conversations about campus security amid the semi-regular occurrence of school shootings.

Constitutional scholars described Rhodes’s threats as a blatant violation of free-speech rights.

“It’s a quintessential First Amendment violation, and most Americans have an instinct about that,” Heidi Li Feldman, a professor at Georgetown Law, said in an interview. “What’s really weird about this is that they announced they will suspend people over the content of their off-campus protest. Content-based restrictions on speech are anathema to the First Amendment. So this looks like a total problem.”

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A superintendent in a Texas school district is warning that students will be suspended if they cause any disruptions to protest gun violence. Needville Independent School District (ISD) Superintendent Curtis Rhodes said in a letter that was sent to families and posted on social media

Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes warned students on Facebook that they will be suspended if Texas school district threatens to suspend students who protest gun violence. Student survivors from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School , where 17 students and faculty

The high school’s Facebook page was no longer available on Tuesday night for unclear reasons.

Rhodes did not respond to an emailed request for comment. His voice mail box at the school was full.

Other schools have sought to curtail student protests as well, though in less blunt terms. Steve Walts, the superintendent of schools in Prince William County in Virginia, also threatened students with disciplinary measures for missing school for protests over gun control.

“PWCS recognizes your right to free speech and to protest, but these rights do not extend to disrupting classes or to leaving school,” he wrote in a letter to parents on Wednesday. “Students who cause disruptions or leave school without authorization will face disciplinary consequences, in keeping with the PWCS Code of Behavior.”

Feldman said that disciplinary measures for missing school and other policy violations must be handed out uniformly — and not just for those who are protesting — in order to be legally sound.

Feldman said that Rhodes’s move was reminiscent of an Iowa school district’s attempt to prevent students from wearing black armbands in protest of the Vietnam War in the 1960s, which prompted a challenge that resulted in a landmark Supreme Court ruling, Tinker vs. Des Moines.

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A Texas superintendent says students will be suspended should they exercise their First Students from Chicago, D.C., Pittsburgh, and Austin showed their support for gun law reform in That means kids who miss class for some other reason outside the gun protests would also be Texas – A letter sent to families by Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes, threatens

The HillA superintendent in a Texas school district is warning that students will be suspended if they cause any disruptions to protest gun Seems more geared toward preventing a disturbance to normal school day activities. That said, if the students are so adamant about protesting then 3 days

Officials from the city’s school district had sent 13-year-old Mary Beth Tinker home from school for wearing the armband and later suspended four other students at the school. The Supreme Court sided overwhelmingly with the students, ruling that students — and teachers for that matter — do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.”

Rhodes has been at the center of legal disputes before.

In 2008, a decision he made to forbid a Native American kindergarten student from wearing long hair was ruled to be a violation of the child’s right to religious freedom twice, by a federal district and appeals court.

“We’re not going to succumb to everything and just wash away our policies and procedures,” he told the Houston Press about his stance in the case, describing Needville as a place of tradition.

“A school district is a reflection of the community,” he said. “We’ve consistently been very conservatively dressed, very conservatively disciplined. It’s no secret what our policy is: You’ll cut your hair to the right point. You’ll tuck in your shirt. You’ll have a belt.”

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a blurry image of a dog: (istock) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post (istock)

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Returning to school two weeks after a gunman took 17 lives at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School raised a mix of emotions and frustrations, surviving students told the South Florida Sun Sentinel. A student is hugged as she leaves Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School after attending her classes on Feb. 28 in Parkland, Florida.

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