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US 24 Pets Died Flying With U.S. Carriers Last Year. 18 Were On United.

09:13  14 march  2018
09:13  14 march  2018 Source:   huffingtonpost.com

Dog Dies After United Flight Attendant Insists Carrier Be Put in Overhead Bin

  Dog Dies After United Flight Attendant Insists Carrier Be Put in Overhead Bin According to passengers, a flight attendant asked that the animal be placed in the bin instead of under the seat.On Monday night, a passenger boarded United Flight 1284 from Houston Intercontinental to New York - LaGuardia with a small dog inside a TSA-compliant carrier. According to the passenger, a flight attendant then demanded that the carrier and animal be placed in the overhead bin for the duration of the flight, instead of under the seat, as is common practice. A witness wrote on Facebook that the passenger protested, but eventually complied. The dog then died sometime during the flight, according to The Points Guy.

Department of Transportation data show that 18 pets died last year in United ' s cargo program. Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries. Clearly the vast majority of animals that flew reached their destinations without incident.

About a year ago, United was criticized after a giant bunny, which was expected to be named the world’ s largest rabbit, died in its cargo area. Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries. Clearly the vast majority of animals that flew reached their destinations without incident.

A dog on a Japan Airlines charter flight that allows pets and their owners to travel together on a three-day tour. © Anadolu Agency via Getty Images A dog on a Japan Airlines charter flight that allows pets and their owners to travel together on a three-day tour.

News that a dog died aboard a United Airlines flight on Monday has renewed interest in the airline’s track record of safely transporting animals.

According to data from the Department of Transportation, United Airlines had the highest number of animal deaths and injuries for any U.S. carrier in 2017. The data pertain only to pets that flew with the airline’s PetSafe cargo program, so it does not relate to the incident Monday in which a dog died after a passenger was reportedly forced to put her pet in its carrier in the overhead bin during a flight from Houston to New York. Pets that fly in-cabin are typically meant to be stowed underneath the seat in front of the owner.

24 Pets Died Flying With U.S. Carriers Last Year. 18 Were On United.

  24 Pets Died Flying With U.S. Carriers Last Year. 18 Were On United. News that a dog died aboard a United Airlines flight on Monday has renewed interest in the airline’s track record of safely transporting animals. According to data from the Department of Transportation, United Airlines had the highest number of animal deaths and injuries for any U.S. carrier in 2017. The data pertain only to pets that flew with the airline’s PetSafe cargo program, so it does not relate to the incident Monday in which a dog died after a passenger was reportedly forced to put her pet in its carrier in the overhead bin during a flight from Houston to New York.

18 Were On United . HuffPost 8 hrs ago Rebecca Shapiro. © Anadolu Agency via Getty Images A dog on a Japan Airlines charter flight that allows pets and The airline flew the most pets of any airline in 2017 through the PetSafe cargo program ― 138,178. Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries.

Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries. Clearly the vast majority of animals that flew reached their destinations without incident. Out of the 24 pet deaths that occurred aboard U . S . carriers last year , 18 were on United flights.

The airline issued a statement Tuesday saying it took full responsibility for the “tragic accident” and said it was conducting a full investigation. But United spokesperson Charlie Hobart said medical experts indicate that an overwhelming number of deaths amid pets who flew in the cargo area last year were due to things beyond the airline’s control, such as preexisting medical conditions.

“Any time there’s a death or an incident, United does a thorough review,” Hobart said. “We reach out to the customer, offer our support and condolences, and we work to ensure that it doesn’t happen again.”

About a year ago, United was criticized after a giant bunny, which was expected to be named the world’s largest rabbit, died in its cargo area.

Death of puppy on United flight prompts U.S. agency probe

  Death of puppy on United flight prompts U.S. agency probe United Airlines faced fresh backlash on Wednesday over a puppy that died in-flight after a cabin attendant ordered it stowed in an overhead bin, and the U.S. Department of Transportation said it was examining the events that led to the French bulldog's death.U.S. Senator John Kennedy, who earlier on Wednesday sent a letter to United Airlines President Scott Kirby demanding information on the high number of animals that have died in the carrier's care, wrote on Twitter that he planned to file a bill on Thursday that would prohibit airlines from putting animals in overhead bins.

Taken as a whole, 24 pet deaths occurred across U . S . carriers , 18 of which occurred on United . It is worth mentioning that this data take into account only the deaths and injuries for pets traveling as part of the carrier ’s aforementioned PetSafe program.

Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered accidents. Clearly nearly all of animals that flew reached their locations with out incident. The similar record from years previous indicated that United additionally had the absolute best collection of puppy deaths in 2016 and 2015.

The Transportation Department numbers indicate how United shapes up with its competitors ― and the comparison doesn’t look good. The airline flew the most pets of any airline in 2017 through the PetSafe cargo program ― 138,178. Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries. Clearly the vast majority of animals that flew reached their destinations without incident.

One might think that more pets flown would inevitably translate into a higher number of animal deaths. However, the rate of pet deaths on United Airlines was also more than double that of the airline with the second highest frequency of pet fatalities, American Airlines. The same report from years past indicated that United also had the highest number of pet deaths in 2016 and 2015.

Of airlines that experienced pet fatalities, Alaska Airlines had the best track record in 2017, with 114,947 pets flown, two deaths and one missing animal. A cat escaped from its kennel as it was being transported on the grounds of Honolulu International Airport. The feline was never found.

United and pet deaths: Airline had the highest rate the last three years

  United and pet deaths: Airline had the highest rate the last three years For pets, the skies of United Airlines lately have not been so friendly. It's not just the French bulldog that died on a Houston-to-New York flight Monday after a United flight attendant told its owners to put the dog in an overhead bin. Data from the US Department of Transportation show that three times as many animals died on United flights last year than on all the other US carriers put together. As you can see from this chart, 2017 wasn't an exception. United has had the highest rate of pet deaths of any US airline for the past three years.

While exactly 24 pets died while flying with U . S . carriers last year , 18 — or 75 percent — of those Roughly a year ago, the story of a giant bunny dying in it’s cargo area went viral. If you are planning on flying with a pet , remember that putting a pet in airline cargo is risky — no matter the carrier .

Out of the 24 pet deaths that occurred aboard U . S . carriers last year , 18 were on United flights. Eighteen pets died and 13 suffered injuries. "We have notified our customers that their pets have arrived safely and are on their way to be reunited with their owners." 24 Pets Died Flying With U . S

“While the number of pet deaths is low, oftentimes when it does happen it’s due to pet stress, such as the animals chewing out of their kennel,” a spokesperson for Alaska Airlines told HuffPost. The airline urged customers to work with their veterinarians to prepare pets for flying weeks before the actual flight.

Putting a pet in airline cargo is risky ― no matter the carrier. Over the years, top U.S. airlines have rotated having the highest number of pet deaths. From 2010 to 2012, Delta held the top spot.

In an interview with HuffPost last year, Inga Fricke, director of pet retention programs at The Humane Society of the United States, cautioned customers against putting their pets in cargo.

“Putting pets in cargo areas should be avoided whenever possible,” she said. “Once that animal is out of your control, there are so many risks it can be exposed to that it’s just not worth it.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

United Airlines pauses cargo-hold pet transport after missteps .
<p>United Airlines is halting the shipment of pets in airplane cargo holds while it studies improvements, the carrier said on Tuesday, after the death of a puppy and mistakes in handling other dogs last week sparked negative publicity.</p>"We are conducting a thorough and systematic review of our program for pets that travel in the cargo compartment to make improvements that will ensure the best possible experience for our customers and their pets," United said in a statement.

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