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US 'Haunted by the tragedy,' Columbine joins U.S. gun violence walkouts

21:46  14 march  2018
21:46  14 march  2018 Source:   reuters.com

Student walkout over guns poses balancing act for schools

  Student walkout over guns poses balancing act for schools As schools around the country brace for student walkouts following the deadly shooting in Parkland, Florida, principals and superintendents are scrambling to perform a delicate balancing act: How to let thousands of students exercise their First Amendment rights while not disrupting school and not pulling administrators into the raging debate over gun control.Some have taken a hard line, promising to suspend students who walk out, while others are using a softer approach, working with students to set up places on campus where they can remember the victims of the Florida shooting and express their views about school safety and gun control.Since the Feb.

drills, and she joined Wednesday’ s national student walkout against gun violence to help prevent massacres, such as the one at Columbine in “I grew up in a community still haunted by the tragedy from 19 years ago. I can see the haunted looks in the eyes of teachers and parents who went through

National School Walkout to protest gun violence . A Columbine High School student holds a sign outside the school during a National School Walkout to honor the 17 students and staff members killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in Littleton, Colorado, U . S . March 14

In this April 28, 1999, file photo, a woman stands among 15 crosses posted on a hill above Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in remembrance of the 15 people who died during a school shooting on April 20, 1999. © AP In this April 28, 1999, file photo, a woman stands among 15 crosses posted on a hill above Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in remembrance of the 15 people who died during a school shooting on April 20, 1999. Like most of her friends at Columbine High School, Abigail Orton had not yet been born when a shooting attack at her school in a Denver suburb left 15 people dead and horrified the country.

She was raised in a world in which students have regular active-shooter drills, as their parents once had fire drills, and she joined Wednesday's national student walkout against gun violence to help prevent massacres, such as the one at Columbine in 1999, from happening again.

Students to put pencils down, walk out in gun protests

  Students to put pencils down, walk out in gun protests From Maine to Hawaii, thousands of students planned to stage walkouts Wednesday to protest gun violence, one month after the deadly shooting inside a high school in Parkland, Florida.Organizers say nearly 3,000 walkouts are set in the biggest demonstration yet of the student activism that has emerged following the massacre of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

drills, and she joined Wednesday’ s national student walkout against gun violence to help prevent massacres, such as the one at Columbine in “I grew up in a community still haunted by the tragedy from 19 years ago. I can see the haunted looks in the eyes of teachers and parents who went through

Columbine is one of more than 2,800 U . S . schools whose students participated in an #ENOUGH rally, with about 250 students walking out of class for 17 minutes at 10 a.m. local time. The walkouts were the latest action by a student-led gun control movement that emerged from the Parkland massacre.

"I grew up in a community still haunted by the tragedy from 19 years ago. I can see the haunted looks in the eyes of teachers and parents who went through it," said the 16-year-old sophomore.

"We want to make changes so no one has to have that look ever again," said Orton, one of thousands of students who took part in protests across the country on the one-month anniversary of the rampage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which 17 students and faculty were killed.

Columbine is one of more than 2,800 U.S. schools whose students participated in an #ENOUGH rally, with about 250 students walking out of class for 17 minutes at 10 a.m. local time.

The walkouts were the latest action by a student-led gun control movement that emerged from the Parkland massacre. It has already helped pass new restrictions on weapons sales in Florida, though enthusiasm for action in Congress appears to be fading.

A generation shaped by gun violence plans to make itself heard today. Here's how

  A generation shaped by gun violence plans to make itself heard today. Here's how Jackson Mittleman opened a news alert on his phone on Valentine's Day, and saw a tragically familiar image: Students with their hands raised, fleeing a shooting.It brought him back to December 14, 2012, when similar images from his hometown of Newtown, Connecticut, were broadcast around the country. On that day, his community joined what he calls a family "no one wants to be a part of.

drills, and she joined Wednesday’ s national student walkout against gun violence to help prevent massacres, such as the one at Columbine in “I grew up in a community still haunted by the tragedy from 19 years ago. I can see the haunted looks in the eyes of teachers and parents who went through

National School Walkout to protest gun violence . A Columbine High School student holds a sign outside the school during a National School Walkout to honor the 17 students and staff members killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in Littleton, Colorado, U . S . March 14

"What happened here and at Parkland should never happen again," said Leah Zundel, 15, a sophomore at the school of 1,664 students, who took part in Wednesday's walkout. "We shouldn't have to go to school in fear for our lives."

Few teachers or staff who were present for the April 20, 1999, attack still work at Columbine High, but the man who served as its principal at the time returned on Wednesday in solidarity with the student walkout.

Frank DeAngelis, who retired as Columbine's principal in 2004, said he considered the student-led movement "phenomenal."

"If the adults won't do anything about it, they will," he said.

A wide array of policy prescriptions have been put forward to stem mass shootings since the Florida attack. That state's legislature has raised the minimum age to buy any sort of gun to 21, from 18, in recognition of the fact that the accused 19-year-old shooter used a legally purchased AR-15 assault-style rifle in the rampage.

Democrats have called for a ban on that style of weapon, which has been used in four of the five deadliest mass shootings by a single gunman in U.S. history. Republicans, including President Donald Trump, have advocated arming teachers to provide a stiffer defense of schools.

Columbine attack survivor Evan Todd said he saw little sense in restricting gun rights, which are enshrined in the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, as an attempt to stop shootings and would rather see some school staff armed.

"Criminals don't pay attention to laws," said Todd, who was a sophomore when he was wounded in the shooting and is now a 34-year-old construction worker. "It's maddening that students are left as sitting ducks." (Reporting by Keith Coffman; Editing by Scott Malone and Jonathan Oatis)

Washington politicians cannot ignore issue of guns any longer .
My six-year-old daughter is just sort of beginning to understand her parents work in politics. "How does someone run for office?" she asked, so I explained all kinds of people can run for office, even kids who have an idea about how to make their school better. Her ideal platform, she decided, would be to get rid of all the teachers so "the kids could be in charge and just eat candy." Even at six, she's fantasizMy six-year-old daughter is just sort of beginning to understand her parents work in politics. "How does someone run for office?" she asked, so I explained all kinds of people can run for office, even kids who have an idea about how to make their school better.

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