US: Schools don’t need guns because ‘it’s mostly ladies that’s teaching,’ Alabama lawmaker says - - PressFrom - US
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US Schools don’t need guns because ‘it’s mostly ladies that’s teaching,’ Alabama lawmaker says

02:55  20 march  2018
02:55  20 march  2018 Source:   msn.com

Teachers line up for concealed carry gun lessons, offered for free at Illinois range

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Schools don ’ t need guns because ‘ it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching ,’ Alabama lawmaker says . Cori Sorensen, a fourth-grade teacher in Highland, Utah, receives firearms training Critics say more guns in the classroom could lead to negligent discharges, which happened as recently as Wednesday.

Alabama State Rep Harry Shivers asserted that believe saying guns should not be placed in the hands of "Our Ladies ".

a man wearing glasses: Cori Sorensen, a fourth-grade teacher from Highland Elementary School in Highland, Utah, receives firearms training in 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post Cori Sorensen, a fourth-grade teacher from Highland Elementary School in Highland, Utah, receives firearms training in 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press)

Many arguments against arming teachers are reasonable enough.

Critics say more guns in the classroom could lead to negligent discharges, which happened as recently as Wednesday. Or their proliferation can spark chaos for police arriving to find an adult with a gun, leading to a bloody misunderstanding.

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An Alabama lawmaker says arming teachers to protect against gun violence in schools is a bad idea because “ it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching ” and the “I taught for 32 years, and it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching , and they got more things to worry about than a gun ,” he said . He elaborated on his

Harry Shiver, a Republican, says that guns don ' t belong in the hands of teachers -- specifically "our ladies ." "We don ' t need to have a lady teacher in a school that ' s got a firearm," he said . "I taught for 32 years, and it ' s mostly ladies that ' s teaching and they get more things to worry about than a

But few have taken a public stance against arming teachers by declaring that it would violate the feminine sensibilities of teachers.

Alabama state Rep. Harry Shiver (R) asserted that belief, saying guns should not be placed in the hands of “our ladies” — meaning female teachers — many of whom he believes are “scared” of firearms.

“I’m not saying all [women], but in most schools, women are [the majority] of the teachers,” Shiver, a lawmaker representing a district northeast of Mobile, told AL.com in an interview published Thursday.

“Some of them just don’t want to [be trained to possess firearms]. If they want to, then that’s good. But most of them don’t want to learn how to shoot like that and carry a gun.”

Shiver did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

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Alabama state Rep. Harry Shiver, a Republican, asserted that belief, saying that to protect “our ladies ” — meaning female teachers — guns should not Proponents of arming teachers have also said schools known to arm teachers would deter would-be assailants who would prefer softer targets.

An Alabama legislator has raised many eyebrows by saying that teachers should not be armed because most of them are women. "I taught for 32 years, and it ' s mostly ladies that ' s teaching , and they got more things to worry about than a gun ." Shivers was backed up by Democratic Rep.

The debate over arming teachers has raged since 17 people, most of them students, were killed at a high school in Parkland, Fla., last month.

President Trump waded into the discussion a week later, saying, “If the coach had a firearm in his locker when he ran at this guy … if he had a firearm he would not have had to run. He would have shot and that would be the end of it,” in a reference to slain football coach Aaron Feis.

Proponents of arming teachers have also said schools that arm teachers would deter would-be assailants, who would prefer softer targets.

Emma González, a leader among vocal students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, told CBS in an episode of “60 Minutes” airing Sunday that arming teachers is a “stupid” idea.

“If you’re a teacher and you have a gun, do you keep it in a lockbox or do you carry it on your person?” González said. “If the teacher dies … and a student who’s a good student is able to get the gun, are they now held responsible to shoot the student who’s come into the door? I’m not happy with that.”

US and Nigeria see painful parallels in school safety debate

  US and Nigeria see painful parallels in school safety debate Facing different but equally harrowing crises, parents and educators in the United States and northeast Nigeria are debating similarly drastic measures to improve school safety as a painful public reckoning plays out in both countries. As students hold walkouts across the U.S. amid a scourge of mass shootings, President Donald Trump's proposal to put more guns in schools carries echoes of questions being asked in one corner of Africa's most populous country. Determined to do something, Nigeria's government has deployed armed guards to schools while parents debate the merits of arming teachers themselves.

“I don ’ t think it ’ s all a revelation to anybody that those who aren’t stellar students usually find the military a better option. … That ’ s not a criticism of anybody. [ Schools don ’ t need guns because ‘ it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching ,’ Alabama lawmaker says ].

"We don ' t need to have a lady teacher in a school that ' s got a firearm,” state Rep. Harry Shiver said . Schools don ’ t need guns because " it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching ," Alabama lawmaker says .

Shiver was voicing opposition to a proposed bill in Alabama that would designate specially trained teachers and administrators on school grounds, requiring annual training of 40 hours that would include active-shooter drills and firearm safety, AL.com reported. That bill cleared the public safety committee and was heading to the State House for debate.

The lawmaker relied on his past as an educator to reinforce his position during the committee hearing Thursday morning.

“We don’t need to have a lady teacher in a school that’s got a firearm,” he said, according to NBC affiliate WSFA. “I taught for 32 years, and it’s mostly ladies that’s teaching.”

Shiver is correct about the demographic makeup. Nearly 80 percent of public school teachers were women in 2011-2012, according to Education Department data.

a man wearing glasses: Cori Sorensen, a fourth-grade teacher from Highland Elementary School in Highland, Utah, receives firearms training in 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post Cori Sorensen, a fourth-grade teacher from Highland Elementary School in Highland, Utah, receives firearms training in 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press) a group of people sitting in front of a crowd: Bobbi Frampton, a vocational teacher, listens during concealed weapons training for 200 Utah teachers on Dec. 27, 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press) © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post Bobbi Frampton, a vocational teacher, listens during concealed weapons training for 200 Utah teachers on Dec. 27, 2012. (Rick Bowmer/Associated Press)

The connection to perceived fragility in women is less clear.

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Alabama State Rep. Harry Shiver, a Republican, said that to protect “our ladies ” — female teachers — guns should not be “We don ’ t need to have a lady teacher in a school that ’ s got a firearm,” he said , according to NBC affiliate WSFA. “I taught for 32 years, and it ’ s mostly ladies that ’ s teaching .”

Alabama , which suffered its own school shooting less than two weeks ago, is currently considering its own bill that would do just that. Harry Shiver, a retired physical education teacher himself, remarked that “our ladies ” shouldn’ t have guns because women and women teachers especially are “scared

Gun ownership was at a nearly 40-year low in 2016, with fewer people owning more guns per person. Most gun owners are men. But gun ownership among women has held consistently since 1980 as ownership among men experienced a decline, TheTrace.org reported.

About one in five women owns a gun, the Pew Research Center found last year, and women appear to view guns as a pure self-defense tool at higher rates than men.

While about 90 percent of men and women who own guns say it is used for protection, 27 percent of women say self-defense is the sole reason they own a firearm, Pew found. That is more than three times the men who say the same, at 8 percent.

That may not be surprising, given the apparent link between domestic violence and violent crimes involving guns.

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