US: Records: Louisiana spent over $1M defending abortion laws - - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

US Records: Louisiana spent over $1M defending abortion laws

18:20  07 june  2018
18:20  07 june  2018 Source:   msn.com

U.S. top court rejects challenge to strict Arkansas abortion law

  U.S. top court rejects challenge to strict Arkansas abortion law In a setback to abortion rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday paved the way for Republican-backed restrictions on medication-induced abortions to take effect in Arkansas that could lead to the shuttering of two of the state's three abortion clinics.The nine justices, with no noted dissents, declined to hear an appeal by abortion provider Planned Parenthood of a lower court ruling that had revived the state law, which sets regulations regarding the RU-486 "abortion pill," after it was earlier struck down by a federal judge. The law had remained blocked pending the outcome of the appeal to the Supreme Court.

(AP) — Louisiana has spent more than $ 1 million to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014, according to A federal court in Louisiana , buttressing a previous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court over a similar law in Texas, ruled last year that the admitting-privileges

(AP) — Louisiana has spent more than $ 1 million to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014, according to A federal court in Louisiana , buttressing a previous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court over a similar law in Texas, ruled last year that the admitting-privileges

FILE - In this July 28, 2015, file photo, Jeff Landry speaks in Baton Rouge, La. Documents obtained by The Associated Press through open-records requests show Louisiana has spent more than a million dollars to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014. State officials say they'll keep spending to defend their laws. Landry is the state Attorney General. © AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File FILE - In this July 28, 2015, file photo, Jeff Landry speaks in Baton Rouge, La. Documents obtained by The Associated Press through open-records requests show Louisiana has spent more than a million dollars to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014. State officials say they'll keep spending to defend their laws. Landry is the state Attorney General.

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana has spent more than $1 million to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press through open-records requests.

Louisiana governor signs ban on 15-week abortions

  Louisiana governor signs ban on 15-week abortions A bid to ban abortions after 15 weeks has become law in Louisiana. A spokesman for Gov. John Bel Edwards says Wednesday that the Democrat has signed the proposal, which would only take effect if a federal court upholds a similar law in Mississippi. A spokesman for Gov. John Bel Edwards says Wednesday that the Democrat has signed the proposal , which would only take effect if a federal court upholds a similar law in Mississippi.

(AP) — Louisiana has spent more than $ 1 million to defend its abortion restrictions against a series of lawsuits since 2014 Louisiana politicians have spent more than $ 1 million to defend legally questionable anti- abortion legislation _ and are set to spend more, according to records obtained by

The Associated Press: Records : Louisiana Spent Over $ 1 M Defending Abortion Laws Louisiana has spent more than million to defend its abortion Contracts with private law firms show the state repeatedly adding thousands of dollars to the agreements, extending them as the cases drag on

And it's set to spend even more.

State contracts with private law firms show the state repeatedly adding thousands of dollars to the agreements, extending them as the cases drag on while Louisiana fights to implement abortion policies that have been halted by the courts.

The ballooning costs also come as the state, amid a looming budget shortfall that has colleges and public safety programs possibly on the chopping block, faces a $4.7 million legal bill from lawyers who won a federal court decision in favor of a lawsuit brought by a clinic that performs abortions. The state has appealed the decision.

Louisiana, like many of its Deep South neighbors, doesn't hesitate to act on its opposition to abortion.

The state has an unenforceable law that allows for someone who "commits the crime of abortion " to be sentenced to a decade of hard labor in prison. Its anti-abortion governor, a Democrat, signed a pre-emptive ban on abortions after 15 weeks that will go into effect if a federal court upholds a similar law in Mississippi. The Republican-controlled, deeply religious legislature introduces a spate of anti-abortion bills every year.

Judge agrees to halt fetal heartbeat abortion law in Iowa

  Judge agrees to halt fetal heartbeat abortion law in Iowa A judge agreed Friday to temporarily block the most restrictive abortion law in the country from taking effect in Iowa next month under an agreement between lawyers for the state and abortion rights groups.Load Error

Overview of abortion laws in Louisiana . Learn more by visiting FindLaw's section on Louisiana Family Laws . Louisiana Abortion Laws . By submitting this form, you agree to Findlaw.com's terms.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Friday temporarily blocked a Louisiana law that its opponents say would leave the state with only one abortion clinic. The court gave no reasons, though it did say that its order was “consistent with” one last June that blocked part of a Texas abortion law .

A spokesman for Gov. John Bel Edwards said the governor thinks the cases are worth fighting. The state's top prosecutor said he'll keep defending Louisiana's laws through a combination of in-house lawyers and outside counsel.

"We will exhaust every legal option we have to ensure these laws are upheld," Attorney General Jeff Landry, a Republican, said in a statement, adding that the private firms have provided excellent legal services. "In Louisiana, it is clear, we will not put a price tag on an innocent, unborn child."

Of the at least $1.14 million the state has paid out to private attorneys on the cases, the contracts show roughly 80 percent of the money has gone to firms led by Kyle Duncan, a prominent religious-rights attorney who was recently confirmed to a seat on a federal appeals court in New Orleans after a nomination from President Donald Trump. Duncan referred questions to the attorney general's office.

Supreme Court wipes away lower court ruling that granted undocumented teen access to abortion

  Supreme Court wipes away lower court ruling that granted undocumented teen access to abortion A unanimous Supreme Court on Monday declined to set a precedent for whether or not an undocumented teen in US custody can get an abortion. The court granted a request from the Trump administration to wipe away a lower court opinion that allowed an undocumented teen in Texas to get an abortion last year. Although the teen -- known as "Jane Doe" in court papers -- has obtained the procedure, the administration wanted the opinion vacated so as not to create a precedent for other similar cases that could come up. In a five-page per curiam opinion, the justices explained that the issue is now moot.

It upheld the Louisiana law by disregarding the findings of the federal district judge who had struck it Doctors’ standing is so much an accepted part of abortion litigation that Louisiana didn’t even I sensed potential trouble when I stumbled upon it by chance over the summer, but the idea that the

Louisiana Abortion Laws . Abortion is a deeply personal and often complex decision for a woman. Planned Parenthood believes a woman should have accurate information about all her options. Information should support a woman, help her make a decision for herself, and enable her to take

The contents of the five lawsuits range widely, but they have a singular claim: The state is actively trying to deprive women of their constitutional right to an abortion.

One case, filed in 2014, challenges a law that requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital no more than 30 miles (50 kilometers) from where the abortion is carried out. The rule was framed as a way to protect women if something goes wrong during an abortion, but critics point out that the state doesn't set this requirement for other, riskier medical procedures.

A federal court in Louisiana, buttressing a previous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court over a similar law in Texas, ruled last year that the admitting-privileges requirement was unconstitutional. Lawyers for Hope Medical Group for Women, a reproductive health center that brought the lawsuit, have since requested $4.7 million from the state to pay for their legal fees. Louisiana immediately appealed the court's decision.

"The coastline of Louisiana is not eroding nearly as fast as a woman's right to determine her own outcome," said Kathaleen Pittman, an administrator at Hope Medical, one of three facilities in the state that perform abortions.

Sessions explains to Congress rationale for not defending ObamaCare

  Sessions explains to Congress rationale for not defending ObamaCare Attorney General Jeff Sessions sent a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) on Thursday defending the Department of Justice's (DOJ) rationale for not defending the Affordable Care Act, also known as ObamaCare."As you know, the Executive Branch has a longstanding tradition of defending the constitutionality of duly enacted statutes if reasonable arguments can be made in their defense," Sessions wrote.

News Law and Policy. Kansas Spends Almost $ 1 Million Defending Anti- Abortion Laws . Conservative governors are amassing millions of dollars in legal fees defending unconstitutional abortion restrictions while many in their states go without basic care.

Louisiana has spent over a million dollars to defend its commitment to life, and the state will The state has utilized various private firms to extend court cases that might otherwise disrupt the implementation of abortion bans, according to open records obtained by The Associated Press.

The health center also is fighting a set of abortion laws passed in 2016, all of which are on hold pending the resolution of the lawsuit, as well as a set of abortion licensing regulations.

One rule would require women to wait three days after an initial doctor's visit before they could get an abortion, though an exception could be made if a woman lived more than 150 miles (240 kilometers) away from a clinic. Another law would require that physicians ensure the remains of a fetus or embryo are buried or cremated, a proposal that critics said would effectively ban abortions that are carried out with medication.

"There's a constant chipping away, making it harder for people to get health care," said Rochelle Tafolla, spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, which has filed lawsuits challenging delays on the group's abortion license and an attempt to strip the organization's Medicaid funding. Planned Parenthood does not currently perform abortions in the state.

Despite the litigation, some Louisiana lawmakers continue to introduce anti-abortion bills that critics say would almost certainly embroil the state in additional lawsuits.

State Sen. John Milkovich, the Democrat who sponsored the bill to ban abortions after 15 weeks, said he wants Louisiana to prohibit the procedure entirely and won't let the threat of a lawsuit dictate his legislation.

"There's no more valid, worthwhile or justified expenditure of money than money spent to stop abortion and protect the lives of the unborn," he said.

Lawsuit challenges Texas abortion curbs .
Lawsuit challenges Texas abortion curbsAn abortion provider that in 2016 persuaded the U.S. Supreme Court to void parts of a restrictive Texas law on Thursday filed a new lawsuit challenging dozens of that state's other curbs on the procedure as unconstitutional.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!