•   
  •   
  •   

US Racial resentment is the biggest predictor of immigration attitudes, study finds

05:27  11 july  2018
05:27  11 july  2018 Source:   msn.com

Poll: Majority says Trump has emboldened racists

  Poll: Majority says Trump has emboldened racists A majority of U.S. voters say President Trump has emboldened racists to express their beliefs openly, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. Fifty-five percent of voters said Trump has made it easier for those with racist beliefs to share those views publicly. Thirty-nine percent disagreed.The Quinnipiac poll took the country's pulse on issuesFifty-five percent of voters said Trump has made it easier for those with racist beliefs to share those views publicly. Thirty-nine percent disagreed.

We found , as he has in a larger population, that racial resentment is the biggest predictor of white vulnerability among white millennials. If Democrats want to defeat him, they will need to overcome that racial resentment . The latest findings are backed by many other studies .

The link between racial resentment and attitudes about gun ownership and gun control is well established in the academic literature : Whites who agree with statements like “if black people would only try Using data from the Voter Study Group survey, I found strong evidence of a relationship.

Keyshia Cole et al. posing for the camera © Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

White Americans’ negative attitudes toward immigrants are driven overwhelmingly by racial prejudices, not “economic anxiety,” according to a new working paper by political scientist Steven V. Miller of Clemson University.

Immigration hard-liners, including President Trump, often frame their arguments with ostensibly race-neutral appeals to public safety or economic interest. As Trump said in July 2015, Mexicans are “taking our jobs. They’re taking our manufacturing jobs. They’re taking our money. They’re killing us.” This has led many commentators to conclude that the attitudes driving Trump and his supporters on questions of immigration are primarily economic, rather than racial in nature.

Who is Therese Patricia Okoumou, the woman who scaled the Statue of Liberty to protest U.S. immigration policy

  Who is Therese Patricia Okoumou, the woman who scaled the Statue of Liberty to protest U.S. immigration policy The woman arrested for scaling the base of the Statue of Liberty on Wednesday as part of a protest against U.S. immigration policy is an immigrant herself and an active participant in the resistance movement against President Trump, according to fellow demonstrators. Therese Patricia Okoumou, 45, of Staten Island, was born and educated in the People’s Republic of Congo, but she has lived in New York for at least the last 10 years, records show.

The answers can be found in the comprehensive American National Election Studies pre- and In our models, racial attitudes towards blacks and immigration are the key factors associated with Both racial resentment and black influence animosity are significant predictors of Trump support among

As a political scientist, Tatishe Nteta studies how racial resentment affects attitudes toward public policy. Read More: Four Years a Student-Athlete: The Racial Injustice of Big -Time College Sports. Meanwhile, racial resentment was the strongest predictor of opposition to

Political scientists have subsequently tested this theory, at least as it applies to Trump support overall, and found it lackingover and over and over again. But Miller’s paper is extremely useful because it removes the question from the specific context of 2016 and places it in a more general policy realm.

Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

To do this, he draws on nationally representative survey data from the American National Election Studies and the Voter Study Group, two well-established surveys of voter attitudes and behavior. To measure views on immigration, the surveys ask respondents whether levels of immigration should be increased, decreased or left the same.

Trump calls on Congress to fix 'insane' immigration laws

  Trump calls on Congress to fix 'insane' immigration laws President Donald Trump is demanding that Congress "FIX OUR INSANE IMMIGRATION LAWS NOW!"Trump, who just weeks ago said Republicans should stop wasting their time on immigration until after November's elections, says in tweets Thursday that, "Congress must pass smart, fast and reasonable Immigration Laws now.

"An analysis of 'feeling thermometer' ratings of Trump finds that attitudes about immigration , Islam and racial The biggest predictor of Trump support among Republican and Republican-leaning voters was a belief that "the growing number of newcomers from other countries threatens U.S. values."

roll in predicting whites’ attitudes toward immigration . Many have found ethnocentrism – general belief. in the superiority of one’s own racial or ethnic group – to be a strong predictor of ANES, but not the GTS survey. Similar to ingroup affect, racial resentment is strongly significant except.

The surveys measure racial attitudes using a well-established battery of questions on “racial resentment.” Political scientists generally define this as something like “a moral feeling that blacks violate such traditional American values as individualism and self-reliance.” It’s measured via agreement with statements like, “It’s really a matter of some people not trying hard enough; if blacks would only try harder they could be just as well off as whites” and “Irish, Italians, Jewish and many other minorities overcame prejudice and worked their way up. Blacks should to the same without any special favors.”

The surveys also include a number of ways to measure what’s come to be known as “economic anxiety”: evaluations about the country’s economic health, as well as respondents' employment status and job market conditions in their communities, counties and states of residence.

Immigration top issue for U.S. voters, economy a close second: Reuters/Ipsos poll

  Immigration top issue for U.S. voters, economy a close second: Reuters/Ipsos poll Immigration tops the economy and healthcare as the most important issue determining Americans' vote ahead of the midterm elections in November, a new Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll shows.Immigration tops the economy and healthcare as the most important issue determining Americans' vote ahead of the midterm elections in November, a new Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll shows.

Shifting racial attitudes . By contrast, more whites say that black people who can’t get ahead are mostly responsible for their own condition (54%) than say that racial discrimination is the bigger impediment to black progress (35%).

We found , as he has in a larger population, that racial resentment is the biggest predictor of white vulnerability among white millennials. If Democrats want to defeat him, they will need to overcome that racial resentment . The latest findings are backed by many other studies .

Miller also controlled for a number of common economic and demographic variables, such as income, education, age, political party and gender. Respondents' race wasn’t included as a control because the study only looked at the views of white respondents.

Miller essentially ran a number of statistical tests to determine how white Americans' economic and racial attitudes correlated with their immigration beliefs: Does being unemployed make white voters more or less likely to support decreasing immigration? What about belief in the strength of the economy? As respondents' racial resentments increase, what does that do to their views on immigration?

All told, the analyses were “unequivocal that racial resentment is reliably the largest and most precise predictor of attitudes toward immigration,” Miller found. As the chart above shows, “racial resentment has the largest magnitude effect” on the odds that a white respondent will express a preference for less legal immigration. The effect of racial resentment has “nearly six times” the impact as a belief that the economy has gotten worse on respondents' propensity to favor less immigration.

Income inequality: Asians in the United States are highest earners, but also most divided

  Income inequality: Asians in the United States are highest earners, but also most divided Asians typically have the highest incomes in the nation. But that statistic belies the fact that the group is also the most economically divided, and the gap is growing larger, a new report from the Pew Research Center found. The highest-earning Asians in the United States make 10.7 times as much as the poorest Asians in 2016, according to Pew, which compared those in the top 10% of the income ladder versus those in the bottom 10%. Those at the top earn just over $133,500, while those at the bottom make just under $12,500.Asians now surpass blacks as the racial and ethnic group with the highest level of income inequality.

The study of immigration attitudes has also borrowed from prior studies of racial attitudes , particularly as it relates to the effect of local context. Partisanship, Local Context, Group Threat, and Canadian Attitudes toward Immigration and Refugee Policy.

The study further finds evidence of a link between racial resentment and climate change denial. This is not to suggest that all climate deniers are racists , merely They added, “Barack Obama’s rise to the presidency further strengthened the relationship between racial resentment and political attitudes .”

The racial resentment questions only ask about attitudes toward black Americans. They don’t mention Hispanic immigrants at all. And yet, Miller found, white Americans' attitudes toward blacks were a powerful predictor of how they felt about immigration. “The familiar racial resentment toward African-Americans is part of a bigger syndrome in which ethnicity/race filters perspectives toward policy, more broadly,” he writes.

Miller cautions that the paper is still in its early stages, and has not yet been peer-reviewed. But his findings do comport with much of the prior research on racial resentment and Trump support, and it makes sense that those attitudes would spill over into more general policy areas as well.

In the end, this should come as no surprise — the empirical case for restricting immigration is a poor one. Studies have consistently shown no link between immigrants and crime, for instance, and the net effect of immigration, legal or otherwise, on the economy tends to be positive, particularly in the long-run.

Moreover, a country with a falling fertility rate needs immigration to offset population decline, fill job vacancies and contribute to government coffers.

In the end, Miller writes, “an ounce of racial resentment is worth a pound of economic anxiety.”

I miss Barack Obama. His Johannesburg speech was a reminder of what the voice of reason sounds like. .
There was the voice of a former U.S. president delivering an eloquent but forceful lecture about global ills and inequality, and pillars of democracy.Load Error

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

This is interesting!