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US Who is Dana Sabraw? 5 things to know about judge who ordered reunification of immigrant families

22:58  11 july  2018
22:58  11 july  2018 Source:   usatoday.com

Why the government missed the deadline to reunite immigrant families

  Why the government missed the deadline to reunite immigrant families WASHINGTON - Criminal background checks, DNA tests, deportations, illnesses and cumbersome communication between three federal government agencies and even more sub-agencies have delayed the reunification of immigrant families that were separated at the border. The Trump administration was supposed to reunite 102 children under age 5 with their parents by Tuesday, according to a deadline imposed by a federal judge in California. It still has not said how many were actually reunited, but figures released Tuesday indicated only four children had been reunited.U.S.

5 things to know about judge who ordered reunification of immigrant families . Dana Sabraw , based in San Diego, last month gave the government 14 days to reunite children under 5, some of whom had been separated from their families for weeks.

5 things to know about judge who ordered reunification of immigrant families . A deadline is set to reunite families , but will it stick? Last month, federal judge Dana Sabraw set a deadline for all parents and children to be reunited by July 26.

The federal judge who ordered the reunification of children separated from their families along the Mexican border is the son of an immigrant with the middle name "Truth.

The government acknowledged it failed to meet Tuesday's deadline set by U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw to reunite about 100 children under age 5 with their families after they were seized along the Mexican border when their parents were arrested for illegally entering the U.S.

Judge to weigh new rules as U.S. works to reunite migrant families

  Judge to weigh new rules as U.S. works to reunite migrant families <p>A federal judge on Friday will consider imposing tougher rules on the U.S. government to ensure it reunites as many as 2,000 immigrant children with their parents by July 26.</p>In a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, U.S. Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego ordered the government in June to reunite families that had been separated after crossing the U.S.-Mexican border. The government failed to meet a Tuesday deadline for reuniting an initial group of children under 5.

Who is Dana Sabraw ? 5 things to know about judge who ordered reunification of immigrant families . Source: Cox Media Group. 'The Handmaid's Tale' Season 2 finale recap: The fight finally begins.

Judge Dana Sabraw in U.S. District Court in San Diego told Sabraw ’s order included exceptions that might threaten the safety of the child. The Legal Aid Society in New York said it is representing at least two children under five who meet the judge ’s criteria for reunification on Tuesday.

Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego, last month gave the government 14 days to reunite children under 5, some of whom had been separated from their families for weeks. He allowed 30 days for older kids.

So who is this guy? His Federal Bar Association profile and his own legal rulings shine some light.

More: 3 young migrant children reunited with their dads in El Paso

More: Mexicans comprise a bigger share of border prosecutions

His mother is an immigrant

Sabraw's father met his mother while he was an Army soldier stationed in Japan during the Korean War. They were married in her native Japan before settling in San Rafael, California, where the judge was born in 1958. He was given a Japanese middle name – Makoto – in honor of his mother’s family. The name translates to "true" or "truth."

Reunification of migrant toddlers, parents should be completed Thursday

  Reunification of migrant toddlers, parents should be completed Thursday The Trump administration is expected to reunite the bulk of the youngest migrant children separated from their parents at the border by Thursday. "We anticipate that, as of the early morning on July 12, we will have reunified all children under age 5 who are eligible under the court order for reunification with parents in the United States," an administration official said. The reunions -- ordered nationwide last month by a federal judge in San Diego -- have come in piecemeal tranches this week, as the government has scrambled to pinpoint the children eligible for return to their parents.

Who is Dana Sabraw ? 5 things to know about judge who ordered reunification of immigrant families . Fast-forward 22 years, and Wei receives a call from Qiang, who is very much alive and wants to reconcile with his brother and Lina.

At the hearing in San Diego Judge Dana Sabraw agreed that some cases "will necessitate additional time" for reunification . "Even a five year old who wasn't traumatised can't always tell you their address or what their parents look like or their last names.

Athlete, parade star, Bush appointee

Sabraw played baseball, wrestled and ran track in high school. During his senior year, he served as grand marshall of Sacramento’s annual Camellia Festival Parade. After graduating from San Diego State in 1980, he took a year off before law school and tooled around in country in a '66 Rambler. Then it was on to the University of the Pacific's McGeorge School of Law. He worked in private practice until becoming a municipal judge in 1995. President George W. Bush nominated him to the federal bench in 2003, and he won unanimous Senate confirmation.

His wife just won an election

Sabraw's wife, Summer Stephan, has been a prosecutor for almost three decades. She was appointed San Diego County's interim district attorney a year ago, and in June was elected to the post. Last year, a Women In The World profile compared her to Olivia Benson, the detective on NBC’s "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." The couple met in law school and has three kids.

Feds can't find moms and dads of 38 migrant children under age 5

  Feds can't find moms and dads of 38 migrant children under age 5 The parents of 19 young children were already deported, and the whereabouts of parents of another 19 are unknown.In a status hearing with U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw of the Southern District of California, who ordered the reunification, government lawyers said the Health and Human Services Department would only be able to reunify about half of approximately 100 children under the age of 5 by the court-ordered deadline of July 10.

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw , who ordered the administration to reunite nearly 3,000 children separated by federal immigration agents, asked an attorney for the ACLU to prepare a proposal for possible punishment if the government misses Tuesday's deadline to reunite the first round of families .

5 . Sabraw is the son of a Japanese immigrant . Dana Sabraw is a federal district judge in San Diego. Late Tuesday night, he ordered the government to reunite families . Home. News.

How he got involved in this case

The ACLU filed suit in March against the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, and Sabraw was assigned the case. The suit sought to reunite an asylum-seeking mother identified as "Ms. L" and her 7-year-old daughter fleeing violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo. They were separated in the U.S. and detained separately 2,000 miles apart. The lawsuit cites violations of the Constitution’s due process clause, federal law protecting asylum seekers and the government’s own directive to keep families intact. "Ms. L" and her daughter were reunited months ago, but the national class-action lawsuit continues.

How is the case going?

At a status hearing Tuesday, Sabraw said he was encouraged by the progress being made by the Trump administration. But he demanded that the government adopt a "streamlined approach" for vetting families. “These are firm deadlines," he said. "They’re not aspirational goals.”

Family reunifications: 450 down, roughly 1,900 to go by Thursday .
The Trump administration has reunited at least 450 families separated at the border with children 5 and older, including almost 100 just overnight. But there are still roughly 1,900 who need to be reunified or ruled ineligible by next Thursday, and a government attorney warned "some complicated issues" will pop up in the coming week. Still, at a court hearing Friday afternoon, the judge who last month ordered the government to put back together the families it had separated at the border said he was very pleased with how things are going.

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