•   
  •   
  •   

US One man plans to ride out Hurricane Florence on his boat

15:46  13 september  2018
15:46  13 september  2018 Source:   usatoday.com

Florence moves deeper into North Carolina and the worst may still be to come

  Florence moves deeper into North Carolina and the worst may still be to come Darkness and danger spread across North Carolina Saturday, as Tropical Storm Florence blasted an ever-widening swath of the state with torrential rain and dangerous wind. Eleven people in North Carolina and one in South Carolina had died from storm-related incidents as of Saturday. The fatalities illustrate the scope of hazards facing people in Florence's broad path: Two were killed by a tree falling on their home, one was electrocuted while connecting extension cords in water and one was blown over by wind while tending his dogs. Another died of a heart attack while emergency workers coming to her aid were blocked by fallen trees.

North Carolina is bracing for storm surge, rainfall and damaging winds from Hurricane Florence . Although many are under evacuation order, one man is riding

Background: One man plans to ride out Hurricane Florence on his boat . Cloer said he wasn't scared of the winds, "I just wanted to get a better view." "You get more sense of it if you're by the point," he said. He said he watched movies and television until he lost power and then just napped.


Fearsome new stage begins as Florence floods inland rivers

  Fearsome new stage begins as Florence floods inland rivers North Carolina is bracing for what could be the next stage of a still-unfolding disaster: widespread, catastrophic river flooding from Florence.NEW BERN, N.C. — As the death toll from Florence mounted and hundreds of people were pulled from flooded homes, North Carolina is bracing for what could be the next stage of a still-unfolding disaster: widespread, catastrophic river flooding.

To ensure its safety, he intends to stay aboard the vessel as Hurricane Florence approaches. A man from North Carolina is protective of his boat , to say the least.

Hurricane Florence 's shifting track is adding uncertainty to what forecasters are calling the "storm of a lifetime." It's now projected to slow near the North Carolina-South Carolina border One man riding out Hurricane Florence on his boat - Продолжительность: 2:31 CBS News 141 398 просмотров.

LITTLE RIVER, S.C. – Rolling up some plastic windows on his 46-foot cabin cruiser Wednesday, Masten Cloer admitted he was nervous. A new weather forecast predicted Hurricane Florence changing paths to make a landfall near his marina at the border of North Carolina and South Carolina.

"I talked to some of the older people down here, and they are worried," he said.

Cloer, himself, though, is thus far undeterred. The 57-year-old from Hudson, North Carolina, is planning to ride out the powerful, destructive storm on his boat, named Later, while it's docked at the marina, located on the Intracoastal Waterway about 2 miles from the Atlantic shore of Cherry Grove Beach.

As Florence loomed, a pet lover escaped South Carolina with 64 dogs and cats on a school bus

  As Florence loomed, a pet lover escaped South Carolina with 64 dogs and cats on a school bus A Tennessee trucker with a school bus rescued pets from animal shelters in the path of Hurricane Florence last week.Tony Alsup closed the door of his old yellow school bus then hit the gas, fleeing from the dark skies and strong winds that loomed offshore. In the bus seats behind him, confused passengers barked and meowed as they were driven to safety.

Read more here: Hurricane Florence : One man plans to ride out the storm on his boat . Buncombe County to declare state of emergency. In eastern NC, hurricane veterans prepare for Florence . In Kinston, a town of nearly 21,000 people living 30 miles of west of New Bern, where the Neuse River

One man riding out Hurricane Florence on his boat - Продолжительность: 2:31 CBS News 141 046 просмотров. Storm chaser: Hurricane Florence went from "zero to crazy in no time" - Продолжительность: 3:11 CBS This Morning 33 562 просмотра.

"We're pretty far from the beach," Cloer said. "But all water rises together."

A backhoe business operator back home in the mountains of North Carolina near Blowing Rock, Cloer said he could and would disembark if the storm becomes too violent.

He's one of dozens of boat owners at the Lightkeepers Village Marina who have chosen to keep their boats docked during the impending storm.

Steve and Jill Forsythe are among them. They removed their boat's canvas, tied double lines around the tall pilings and secured the sails Wednesday in preparation for the storm.

Track Hurricane Florence

“We have a 46-foot boat with a 5-foot draft, so there are just not a ton of places you can put it,” Jill Forsythe said. “So we’re tying it up and hoping for the best.”

Setting sail for a new location wasn't a reasonable option.

"We’re not as fast as the Navy in outrunning a storm,” she said.

Slideshow by Photo Services

But the predicted path of Hurricane Florence was enough to encourage her and her husband to leave their boat behind.

“We’re not going to stay for this one," she said. "We’re going to head west to get out of the flood zone and then head north.”

George Rubis, assistant dockmaster of the marina, said the marina has 125 slips, and about half of those boats have been moved. He said it is a personal decision by each boat's owner what they decide to do in the face of a storm.

Eric and Barbara Coates of Little River plan to keep their boat docked and stay in a nearby condo.

“We’ll be staying here and hoping the boat is still here when it’s done,” Eric Coates said.

His wife said they can see the boat, a 44-foot-long fast trawler, from their condo. The couple have owned their boat since 2010, and Eric said he has been boating for 30 years.

“I’ve been in some storms,” he said, “but this one could be fun.”

Many members of the surrounding neighborhood say they plan to stay in their residences, fortified by their experiences with prior hurricanes.

a man sitting on a boat: Masten Cloer prepares his boat for Hurricane Florence at the Lightkeepers Marina in North Myrtle Beach on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Cloer, who lives in North Carolina, said he drove down to protect his new boat and will be staying in it during the hurricane.© JOSH MORGAN/Staff Masten Cloer prepares his boat for Hurricane Florence at the Lightkeepers Marina in North Myrtle Beach on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Cloer, who lives in North Carolina, said he drove down to protect his new boat and will be staying in it during the hurricane. Around the corner from the marina, Stacy and Billy Prince packed their vehicle to leave Wednesday afternoon. Stacey said it was the change in forecast that led to the decision.

She and her husband took jewelry, photo albums, videos, some clothes and their dog, Dixie.

“We’re from here all our lives,” Billy Prince said. “We’ve been through Hugo, Diane, Fran, all of them. We’ve never evacuated. But we’re not going to play around with a Category 4.”

They said they are headed for Florida, possibly Orlando.

“I just feel sorry for people who are new here and don’t have a clue,” Stacy said.

Karly Suggs and Jesse Prince also were packing to leave Wednesday. The couple loaded their large pickup truck and SUV Wednesday from their Light Keepers Village residence. For them, too, it was the new forecast.

“That’s what pushed us away,” Suggs said.

They had thought about going south, but a family member who came from Georgia Tuesday said traffic on Interstate 95 was backed up bumper to bumper. So they plan to head toward Greensboro, North Carolina, stopping along the way to pick up Suggs’ mom and dad in Tabor City.

Suggs said it was difficult deciding what to take.

“Basically anything important, like birth certificates, college degree diplomas,” she said.  They placed other items on furniture off the floor in case of flooding.

Nearby, Keith Cooper, who has lived in his Little River neighborhood for a year after moving from Arizona, had decided to stay through the storm though his wife and family had left for Charlotte.

“I’m afraid about getting access back in after it’s all over,” he said. “I have radios, water, batteries. I’m a former Boy Scout.”

Also deciding to stay were Barbara and Gregg Smith.

“At this point we’re staying,” Gregg Smith said. “She wants to ride it out. She has all her kids here, and she wants to be around her grandkids. I’m very concerned. This is not going to be a good one.”

Barbara said the couple stayed in their home during Hurricane Matthew and “were fine,” as was the nearby marina. Hand-held radios and a generator are included in their gear.


'There is no access to Wilmington' as flooding overwhelms North Carolina .
At least 17 people have died in the wreckage of the hurricane-turned-tropical depression that dumped 30 inches of rain in parts of the state.(Pictured) Members of the North Carolina Task Force urban search and rescue team wade through a flooded neighborhood looking for residents who stayed behind as Florence continues to dump heavy rain, on Sept., 16, in Fayetteville, N.C.

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!