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USStormy Election Day unfolding in the East; 1 dead as violent weather lashes South

18:16  06 november  2018
18:16  06 november  2018 Source:   usatoday.com

Potent storm to impact states with key races in 2018 Midterm Elections

Potent storm to impact states with key races in 2018 Midterm Elections Voter turnout for Tuesday's midterm elections may be affected as a potent storm unleashes rain, strong winds and potentially violent thunderstorms across the eastern and midwestern United States. According to research, weather influences some voters' response when making a decision to head to the polls. "Weather was found to be, on average, nearly 20 percent of the change in voter turnout based on our analysis," according to AccuWeather Data Scientist and Meteorologist Tim Loftus. "Democrats are more weather sensitive, when compared to Republicans, and among the most weather-sensitive were African-Americans, those 65 and older and 18-24 year olds," he said.

Election Day weather : Should Republicans rejoice? Wind, rain, thunderstorms expected in Midwest, South . A powerhouse storm is forecast to soak a large In contrast to the East , weather in the West should be best, AccuWeather said. Other than some pesky showers in Washington and Oregon, the

Drier weather will sweep over most areas being threatened by the severe weather for Election Day . Sunday’s calm weather in the northeastern United States will not last with more soaking rain, gusty winds and thunderstorms on the horizon, which could affect voter turnout on Election Day .

Severe thunderstorms, strong winds and heavy rain across the eastern U.S. could impact voter turnout in Tuesday's midterm elections, according to an AccuWeather analysis.

The possible storms in the Mid-Atlantic could affect up to 5 million people, the Storm Prediction Center said. Damaging wind gusts and even tornadoes may hit the area, the center said, while isolated gusts may strike the Carolinas and eastern Gulf states. Marginally severe hail may also occur late Tuesday in Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Nine dead in Italy storms as wild weather sweeps Europe

Nine dead in Italy storms as wild weather sweeps Europe The death toll from fierce storms battering Italy has risen to nine, civil protection authorities said Tuesday, as wild weather swept parts of Europe, leaving motorists and tourists stranded. Road were blocked and thousands of people were left without power in southern and central Europe, as rains and violent winds sparked flooding, tore trees from their roots and whipped debris into the air. Thick snow has also cloaked French and Italian mountain regions, trapping scores of drivers in their cars and tourists in hotels.

The final day of the Memorial Day holiday weekend will feature stormy weather over parts of the South and East , while parts of the West sear in summer heat. A southward dip in the jet stream will be the large-scale weather feature dominating most locations to the east of the Rockies Monday, which

An approaching storm looms over the French riviera city of Nice, southeastern France, on June 15, 2015. New York, and much of the East Coast and Western United States is experiencing unusually cold weather with temperatures in the teens and the wind chill factor making it feel well below zero.

Violent storms in Tennessee early Tuesday killed one person in Rutherford County and injured at least two others. More than 50,000 customers in Tennessee were without power Tuesday morning, according to PowerOutage.us.

More: Election Day weather forecast: Potent storm to blast eastern US, could affect voter turnout

More: Severe storms, tornadoes rattle Deep South, leaving 2 dead and 100,000 powerless

Also: USA's infamous 'Tornado Alley' may be shifting east

Weather causes nearly 20 percent of the change in voter turnout on average, according to AccuWeather data scientist and meteorologist Tim Loftus.

Those 65 and older, 18- to 24-year-olds and African-Americans are among the most sensitive to severe weather conditions, Loftus said.

How several states prepare for severe weather, power outages during an election

How several states prepare for severe weather, power outages during an election As millions of Americans prepare to cast their vote on Tuesday, severe weather may make traveling to polling places difficult. A potent storm will push into the East on Tuesday, with severe thunderstorms forecast for parts of the region. While storms may cause some travel disruptions, they could also pose challenges for election sites, especially if power outages occur, or a tornado warning is issued. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

As the storm moved east , a possible tornado destroyed 24 units and damaged six others at The Moorings Apartments in Pensacola, Fla The National Weather Service estimated that more than 7 million people in the South were at enhanced risk for severe weather through Tuesday evening.

Matthew Lashes Popular Island Getaway. Three deaths have been reported in South Carolina in the wake of Hurricane Matthew, including a man who drowned after Earlier in the day , Richland County coroner Gary Watts said 66-year-old David Outlaw was found dead Saturday morning, pinned

In Florida's Panhandle, showers and thunderstorms may prevent people from walking to polling stations or waiting outside to vote. Throughout the state, Loftus said the muggy conditions expected Tuesday have been associated with lower voter turnout in the past.

Higher humidity has also led to lower voter turnout in Mississippi, where sticky air is expected to remain in the state's southernmost areas on Tuesday. Although northern and central parts of the state can expect lower humidity, residents could be dealing with storm damage and outages.

To the north in New York, rain and wind gusts as high as 50 mph Tuesday could also deter voters, Loftus said. Before the storm progresses with the day, warmer-than-average early-morning temperatures may be more favorable for voting.

On Monday, there were four reports of tornadoes across the South in Louisiana, Alabama and Tennessee.

Election Day forecast: Tennessee power outages and vicious weather, storms across Southeast and into Northeast

Election Day forecast: Tennessee power outages and vicious weather, storms across Southeast and into Northeast A storm system blamed for at least one death in Tennessee is charging east Tuesday -- just as millions of Americans head to the polls to cast their votes in the midterm elections. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); One woman was killed and two others were injured after a possible tornado tore through Rutherford County late Monday. Officials told FOX17 the woman died when a home collapsed in Christiana, located about 40 miles southeast of Nashville.

A massive storm clobbered the eastern United States on Saturday and in some places appeared poised to dump much more snow in than expected.

The violent weather destroyed several homes in the town of Bondurant. (The meteorological ingredients for a potential severe weather outbreak in the South on Feb. This prompted the Storm Prediction Center to issue a rare day 7 outlook Wednesday for the Groundhog Day severe potential.

Contributing: The Associated Press

Severe storms, tornadoes rattle Deep South, leaving 2 dead and 100,000 powerless.
Severe storms roared across the Deep South late Wednesday and early Thursday, leaving 2 people dead and about 100,000 homes and businesses powerless. At least two other people were sent to a hospital because of a possible tornado touchdown in Louisiana. Eight tornadoes were reported across the region late Wednesday and early Thursday, AccuWeather said. Overall, there were more than 100 reports of severe weather in the South, the Storm Prediction Center said. Most were in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. Trees and utility lines were down across a wide area from eastern Louisiana to northwest Alabama.

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