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US Women's march activists aim to build a movement

18:35  28 january  2017
18:35  28 january  2017 Source:   usatoday.com

Clinton, Democrats show support for Women's March on Washington

  Clinton, Democrats show support for Women's March on Washington Hillary Clinton, along with a bevy of other prominent female politicians, got involved on Twitter to promote the marchThe day following President Trump’s inauguration, women descended on the nation’s capital in a show of strength supporting women’s rights.

The Women ' s March crushed expectations as 2.6 million attendees stood strong. This is what women organizers are doing to push the movement forward. USA TODAY.

Women ’ s March is a women -led movement providing intersectional education on a diverse range of issues and creating entry points for new grassroots activists & organizers to engage in their local communities through trainings, outreach programs and events.

A sign seen during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Downtown Los Angeles for the Women's March in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Women's Marches are being held in cities around the world © Chelsea Guglielmino A sign seen during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Downtown Los Angeles for the Women's March in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Women's Marches are being held in cities around the world Pallas Diaz is fired up. Terri Siler is raising money. Emiliana Guereca is encouraging others to get involved.

These three women from Florida, Indiana and California, and many, many others, want to take the energy from last Saturday's Women's Marches and channel it into a movement. Interviews with  participants from throughout the USA TODAY Network underscore the challenges that activists face in the aftermath of a march that had little national infrastructure. They say it’s up to participants in critical swing states and districts to take the initiative and set priorities. And they hope they can organize in the geographic areas that matter most as Democrats seek to win back the U.S. House and Senate.  

The anti-Trump opposition began Saturday. Here’s what it should do.

  The anti-Trump opposition began Saturday. Here’s what it should do. This passion could be channeled into a movement that is reasonable and effective. Or not. Untold hundreds of thousands of people swamped city streets from Washington, D.C., to Washington state. It was called the Women’s March, and when the crowd, a sea of pink knit hats, cheered along Pennsylvania Ave., the roar was markedly high-pitched. But even before the march began, it had transformed from a feminist rally into a larger political statement, drawing men and women, longtime activists and first-time protesters, and signs about health care, climate change, political civility and other big causes.

Women ’ s March Inc., which organized the event in Washington, has encouraged more protests. It said that while the group was “supportive of any efforts to build our collective power as women ,” it The Women ’ s March a year ago aimed to start a movement of women from all walks of life who

The International Women ’ s Strike is a network of women in more than 50 different countries that emerged through planning a day of action for March 8th, 2017. We aim to build relationships of solidarity between diverse organizations of women , and all those who seek to build a global feminist

“Right now there’s so much energy and excitement after the women’s march in D.C.,” said Diaz, a founder of Collier Freedom, one the new groups in Southwest Florida formed in the aftermath of the Nov. 8 election. 

The region, traditionally a more conservative pocket of the state, drew some 2,500 in Naples and an additional 1,000 at a separate Cambier Park rally. “We’re all kind of new, but interlinked and all trying to do it together,” said Diaz, whose group will focus on the environment, immigration and health care.

In Indianapolis, Terri Siler recently helped form a political action group called Hoosiers for Action. Siler led a sister rally in Indianapolis after helping to manage Hillary Clinton’s Indiana campaign. The PAC will raise money to recruit and fund grass-roots candidates for elected offices in Indiana. It is collecting information to notify people about legislation and other information and is active on social media.

Democrats see hope in women’s marches — but wonder what comes next

  Democrats see hope in women’s marches — but wonder what comes next The marches captured the enthusiasm Democrats failed to generate during the campaign.“I was like — oh, now you’re interested?” Ellison (D-Minn.) remembered with a laugh.

A year ago, when millions of people stormed the streets in women ’ s marches to proclaim their outrage and despair at the inauguration of Donald J. Trump, no one knew whether it was a moment or a movement . Now the answer is coming into focus.

The women ’ s marches in Washington, DC and around the country were stunning, inspiring, and the first of a If the Left doesn’t engage with the aim of contending for leadership and influence, we just concede To build a mass movement against Trump, we have to engage newcomers productively.

In Los Angeles, Emiliana Guereca, an art festival organizer who planned the Los Angeles march, is one of several organizers speaking at colleges and to local groups who’ve asked how to get involved. "It's basically on a local level organizing people," she said. "I think everybody needs to stay together otherwise your voice gets diluted. Your big roar turns into these little yelps," Guereca. 

Sandy Bieler Rao, a 62-year-old who stood on Fifth Street in Los Angeles in a pink, knitted cat-ear hat with a sign that showed her 92-year-old mother and her 4-month old granddaughter, said she was surrounded by strangers who seemed like sisters “I think it energized people,” she said. “It made us realize we are the majority.”

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The official march co-chairs have stayed out of the public eye since the march while directing people to a website calling for 100 days of action every 10 days, beginning with a postcard writing campaign to U.S. senators. “Saturday was a historic day as millions of women and families mobilized for fairness and equality across the globe,” the organizers said in an email to USA TODAY. “We will continue to reveal new information as the co-chairs and national organizers continue to develop next steps for this movement."

Yarn shop won't sell to 'women's movement' supporters

  Yarn shop won't sell to 'women's movement' supporters A knitting shop in Tennessee is asking those who want yarn for any project relating to the recent "women's movement" to go elsewhere.NASHVILLE — A knitting shop in Tennessee is asking those who want yarn for any project relating to the recent "women's movement" to go elsewhere.

Learn about the team behind the Women ' s March on Washington including National Co-Chairs Tamika D She is most notably recognized for her focus on intersectional movement building . Sophie Ellman-Golan is a social justice activist committed to organizing for racial and gender justice, queer

The Women ’ s March has helped build a kind of fast-track to movement leadership, both by modeling how it’s done— Women ’ s March co-president Bob Bland had little experience in traditional activism before she made a Facebook event for the march that went viral—and by creating opportunities for

Some women expressed a desire for more guidance. "Everyone is asking the same question, and everyone is looking for leadership," said Elizabeth Meyer, organizer of the Trenton, N.J., march.  "How do we harness the momentum?"

Guereca worries a group of 30 women taking action each week will shrink to 20 women, then to 15. Therefore Los Angeles organizers will announce a follow-up plan to the march in the next few days. She declined to reveal details except to say there will be another event and it will happen soon. “By the end of the year, you have three (people),” she said. “It’s about masses and numbers. You can’t be ignored when you have that many people.”

Other said they just need time to figure out how best to proceed. “After Saturday, I don’t think anything is too big anymore,” said Cheetah McClellan, a political novice who helped organize the Denver march that drew more than 100,000. “We really proved that you don’t have to be someone special, a board member, a politician, to enact some real energy and passion," McClellan said.

She added: “I think a lot of women are counting on us to give the something to do. That feels like a huge responsibility.”

Women's March could lead to bigger movement than Tea Party

  Women's March could lead to bigger movement than Tea Party There are already signs the historic Women's March on Washington was the start of a growing grass-roots resistance to President Trump’s agenda. The night after the biggest national demonstration in U.S. history, a coalition of activists led by MoveOn.org held an “emergency” conference call to discuss next steps — it drew an estimated 60,000 participants. At least 3,000 people have RSVP’d on Facebook to a Thursday rally outside a Republican lawmaker retreat at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel where Trump will speak.

The Me Too movement (or #MeToo movement ), with many local and international alternative names, is a movement against sexual harassment and sexual assault.

Since January, the Women ’ s March has built on that momentum, aiming to create a movement . They’re aiming to assemble first-time activists and movement leaders, rising political stars who reflect the country’s shifting demographics, and women who’ve organized sister marches , huddles, rallies

Other interviews give a snapshot of efforts taking place across the nation:

California

Three days after the march, Rao and 30 other people gathered at a local office of Rep. Julia Brownley, D-Calif., some carrying signs protesting Trump.

Every week for the first 100 days of the presidency, as part of a movement called Resist Trump Tuesday, she and the others plan to connect with an elected leader or somehow send a message of their discontent.

The lifelong Democrat said the goal is to use the tactics employed by the right. “I mean activism, pure and simple. In your face,” she said. “We’re always reasonable and we cannot be anymore. We have to take a page from the Tea Party. We have to be single minded and laser focused.”

Guereca, the art festival organizer, said Los Angeles organizers will announce a follow-up plan to the march in the next few days. She declined to reveal details except to say there will be another event and it will happen soon.

Colorado

McClellan and Jessica Rogers are meeting on Saturday with a core group of attendees to figure out what’s next. They’re thinking about starting a non-profit to focus on legislative change while also forming a large pool of women who can protest key issues on short notice.

“We have these wildly swinging feelings,” McClellan said. “One day we’re hopeful and the next day in despair.”

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  Black activists look to Trump, GOP as allies in the fight against abortion Black women have a higher rate of abortion than any other group.It was her uncertainty about exactly where the Republican businessman stood on the issue that Davis, a 64-year-old African American, says is the most important one facing the black community: abortion.

International women ’ s day: millions join marches and take action. From Movement 4Bernie to Movement for the 99%, we are trying to build a mass movement for a new kind of politics.

March 1st Movement Samil Movement . The Consulate building appears in the background―Seoul. Korean spectators viewing the Korean flag on the Independence Memorial Arch. Thousands of enthusiastic Koreans, including women and girls, shouting "Mansei" with hands in the air outside the

Rogers said they’ve consulted with existing non-profit leaders, who’ve urged them to maintain some level of leadership roles to honor the movement’s authentic grass roots. “It’s really easy to identify problems,” she said. “It’s a lot more difficult to find solutions, solutions that are applicable. This is still in its infancy.”

New Jersey

In Wyckoff, an affluent Republican-leaning bedroom community outside of Manhattan, organizers have scheduled events in February and March aimed at getting more women involved in the political process.

"What are our concrete next steps?  We need to get more women interested in running for office," said Erin Chung, who helped organize the march. She once worked for Trump, handling public relations for the Miss Universe pageant.  

The group hopes to serve as a clearinghouse in helping people channel their concerns — over reproductive rights, climate change, a free press and a host of other topics — into political action.  "It now about 'how you can get your butt in gear," said Chung.

Florida

Kathy Mayo, president of the Lee-Collier chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), attended the march in Washington. Her organization, which set up a stand at the park, gave out every piece of literature it came with. “We saved one sheet, and people were coming up and taking photos of it so they could have the information,” she marveled. “We got 300 new names on our newsletter list. People just generally seem motivated.”

“It’s not what’s next. It’s what’s now,” declared Cynthia Odierna of Naples. “I think the march showed the general public they’re not alone. They may have the power, but we have the numbers.’

Several local groups have talked about learning from the Indivisible Guide, a strategy handbook that is said to be from former congressional staffer, for getting action. Odierna is one of the founders of a group called the Southwest Florida Resistance Coalition.

“Our message is nonpartisan. … Welcoming people who have buyer’s remorse is going to be the strength of the movement,” she said. Her group is planning “Moral Mondays,” meetings twice a month for people to learn what all the Southwest Florida groups involved in resistance to the new administration need or are doing; the other two are for her organization’s leaders to meet for their own planning.

Contributing: Tom Kisken, Ventura County Star; Harriet Heithaus, Naples News; Chris Sikich, IndyStar; Debra Vial, The Record in N.J., Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY 

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