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USCalifornia heads to court to fight Trump birth control rules

08:55  11 january  2019
08:55  11 january  2019 Source:   msn.com

Judge blocks Trump birth control coverage rules in 13 states

Judge blocks Trump birth control coverage rules in 13 states A U.S. judge in California has blocked Trump administration rules, which would allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control, from taking effect in 13 states and Washington, D.C. The plaintiffs sought to prevent the rules from taking effect as scheduled on Monday while a lawsuit against them moved forward. Judge Haywood Gilliam on Sunday granted their request for a preliminary injunction but rejected their request that he block the rules nationwide. California and the other states argue that the changes would force women to turn to state-funded programs for birth control and lead to unintended pregnancies. The U.S.

New rules vastly expand religious exemptions from an Obama-era requirement for employers to include birth control coverage in their health insurance plans. A move by the Trump administration to relax requirements that employers provide coverage for contraception has elicited fierce outcry and a raft of

California is one of the states that sued to block the initial rules , which prompted federal judges in California and Pennsylvania to grant Meanwhile, the new rules from the Trump administration won’t take effect for about two months. For his part, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro told The

California heads to court to fight Trump birth control rules© The Associated Press FILE - In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, La., wears a birth control pills costume during a protest in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A U.S. judge will hear arguments Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, over California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration that would allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. The new rules are set to go into effect on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

SAN FRANCISCO — A U.S. judge will hear arguments Friday over California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration that would allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women.

Judge: Women would lose birth control coverage under rules

Judge: Women would lose birth control coverage under rules OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A "substantial number" of women would lose birth control coverage under new rules by the Trump administration that allow more employers to opt out of providing the benefit, a U.S. judge said at a hearing on Friday. Judge Haywood Gilliam appeared inclined to grant a request by California and other states that he block the rules while the states' lawsuit moves forward. He said he would rule before Monday, when the rules are set to take effect. The changes would allow more employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing no-cost contraceptive coverage to women by claiming religious objections.

This month, federal judges in Pennsylvania and California issued orders temporarily blocking the Trump rules . And once again, basic preventive health Many women use birth control to treat other medical conditions. Access to birth control prevents unintended pregnancies and by extension can

“The California Department of Justice will fight to protect every woman’s right to healthcare, including reproductive healthcare." Becerra’s suit comes hours after Trump ’s administration announced a new rule that will allow all employers to opt out of including birth control in their health care plans, rolling

Judge Haywood Gilliam previously blocked an interim version of those rules — a decision that was upheld in December by an appeals court. But the case is before him again after the administration finalized the measures in November, prompting a renewed legal challenge by California and other states.

Gilliam was not expected to rule immediately at the end of hearing.

At issue is a requirement under President Barack Obama's health care law that birth control services be covered at no additional cost. Obama officials included exemptions for religious organizations.

The new rules set to go into effect on Monday would allow more categories of employers, including publicly traded companies, to back out of the requirement by claiming religious objections. They would also allow small businesses and other employers to object on moral grounds.

Judge Blocks Trump Birth Control Policy in 13 States, D.C.

Judge Blocks Trump Birth Control Policy in 13 States, D.C. The new rules would roll back Obama-era contraception mandates.

That same year, California became the first state to pass birth control legislation codifying Obamacare’s requirements, which provided a blueprint for other states to do so. “The message we want to send is that women are here to fight back, and states are leading the resistance.”

California state law already requires insurers to cover birth control , but state officials have argued the federal directive could affect as many as 6.8 million Californians who are currently on employer-sponsored health plans that fall outside that state directive. Americans United, a group that advocates

California heads to court to fight Trump birth control rules© The Associated Press FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2016, file photo, a one-month dosage of hormonal birth control pills is displayed in Sacramento, Calif. A U.S. judge will hear arguments over California’s attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration allowing more employers to claim religious objections to providing birth control benefits. The rules set to go into effect on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

The rules "protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objectors from being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs," the U.S. Department of Justice said in court documents.

The states argue that millions of women could lose free birth control services, forcing them to seek contraceptive care through state-run programs and leading to unintended pregnancies.

Attorneys for California and the other states said in court documents the new rules were very similar to the interim measures. One difference is a suggestion in the new rules that women can seek contraceptive coverage through federal family planning clinics for low-income people, according to the states.

The states say that would be an inadequate replacement for the contraceptive coverage many women currently have.

Gender 'X': New York City adds gender-neutral option to birth certificates.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday signed a bill adding a third gender category, known as "X," to the city's birth certificates.

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