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USAlabama city built on federal dollars feeling shutdown pinch

18:16  11 january  2019
18:16  11 january  2019 Source:   msn.com

Unpaid US federal workers are asking for donations to survive through the shutdown

Unpaid US federal workers are asking for donations to survive through the shutdown Some US federal workers affected by the government shutdown are resorting to crowdfunding to cover basic expenses, from mortgages to food. About 800,000 workers have…

As the government's partial shutdown pushed toward a third week, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are feeling the financial pinch . For many furloughed federal employees, the worst part is the uncertainty over how long the shutdown will last. A look at some of their worries

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HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Once known for its cotton trade and watercress farms, Huntsville, Alabama, is now the ultimate government town: About 70 federal agencies are located at the Army's 38,000-acre Redstone Arsenal. More than half of the area's economy is tied to Washington spending.

As the government shutdown drags into a third week, people and businesses that rely on that federal largesse for their livelihood are showing the strain.

What happens in a partial government shutdown? Smithsonian museums, National Zoo close doors

What happens in a partial government shutdown? Smithsonian museums, National Zoo close doors The Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo in Washington, DC, closed their doors Wednesday as the partial government shutdown entered its 12th day. The 19 museums in the Smithsonian Institution's collection and the National Zoo initially remained open during the shutdown, which started on December 22. In a tweet on December 27, the institution said the museums and zoo would close Wednesday, January 2 if there was no deal to fund the government passed into law and signed by President Donald Trump.

For many furloughed federal employees, the worst part is the uncertainty over how long the government shutdown will last. PHILADELPHIA (AP) - As the government's partial shutdown pushed toward a third week, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are feeling the financial pinch .

As the government's partial shutdown pushed toward a third week, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are feeling the financial pinch . For many furloughed federal employees, the worst part is the uncertainty over how long the shutdown will last. A look at some of their worries

Empty parking lots and darkened offices at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center on Redstone have translated into vacant hotel rooms because out-of-town government workers and contractors aren't coming. Restaurants frequented by federal workers who travel on government spending accounts are struggling, too.

Transportation Security Administration employees working without pay at the city's airport say they are spending their own money to bring in quiches and breakfast rolls as a morale booster. Moms are sharing tips online about free entertainment and buying food in bulk to save a few bucks. The largest credit union has already provided hundreds of bridge loans for struggling families.

"It's a fog with no end in sight," said Michael Northern, an executive with a small company that runs three restaurants outside a main arsenal gate. The lunch crowd is still OK, he said, but dinner dollars have dried up, and business is off at least 35 percent.

'My mortgage is due' Some U.S. federal workers seek shutdown cash

'My mortgage is due' Some U.S. federal workers seek shutdown cash 'My mortgage is due' Some U.S. federal workers seek shutdown cash

My feeling is that @realDonaldTrump will not end the shutdown before January 13th for any reason. You can add location information to your Tweets, such as your city or precise location, from the web and via third-party applications.

By Claudia Lauer and Michael Kunzelman, Associated Press. Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 | 9:01 a.m. PHILADELPHIA — As the government's partial shutdown pushed toward a third week, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are feeling the financial pinch .

Alabama city built on federal dollars feeling shutdown pinch© The Associated Press Katie Barron gestures while looking at a pay increase notice for her children's day care, in her home in Madison, Ala., Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Barron's husband is a National Weather Service meteorologist forced to work without pay during the shutdown because his job is classified as essential. They've put off home and car maintenance, but the $450-a-week bill for day care still has to be paid, as do the mortgage and utility bills. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

"People are just going home and nesting, trying to conserve resources," said Northern, vice president of WJP Restaurant Group. "Imagine being in that posture and hearing Donald Trump say, 'It could be a year.'"

The closure persists because the president and congressional Democrats can't agree on $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall, which Trump touts as vital to U.S. security and critics see as pointless and immoral.

Couple’s national park wedding may be canceled due to government shutdown

Couple’s national park wedding may be canceled due to government shutdown A couple planning to wed at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park received an e-mail saying their wedding had been canceled

As the government's partial shutdown pushed toward a third week, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are feeling the financial pinch . For many furloughed federal employees, the worst part is the uncertainty over how long the shutdown will last. A look at some of their worries

MARIANNA, Fla. — A federal prison here in Florida’s rural Panhandle lost much of its roof and fence during Hurricane Michael in October, forcing hundreds of inmates to relocate to a facility in Yazoo City , Miss., more than 400 miles away.

The jobs of some 800,000 workers hang in the balance. A little more than half are still working without pay, and hundreds of thousands will miss paychecks Friday.

Economic statistics lag real-time events, so it's hard to gauge the effects of a shutdown that's been going on less than a month.

But in Huntsville, a city of about 195,000 people where about 38,000 people work at Redstone, more than 5,000 workers are affected by the shutdown. And while state statistics show fewer than 60 people have applied for jobless benefits in the county surrounding Huntsville since the shutdown, frustration and worry are building.

Located at the base of a mountain in the lush Tennessee Valley, Huntsville was just another Alabama city until the government decided to build rockets at Redstone Arsenal at the dawn of the space race. The influx of people and federal dollars that arrived with NASA transformed the city into a technical and engineering hub that only grew as Army missile and materiel programs expanded on the base.

That heavy reliance on federal spending has Huntsville residents wondering what will come next.

Realtors Say the Government Shutdown Is Sinking Home Sales

Realtors Say the Government Shutdown Is Sinking Home Sales The U.S. housing market, already losing steam, is taking another hit from the government shutdown, delaying closings and damaging buyer confidence, according to a National Association of Realtors survey. About 20 percent of 2,211 agents surveyed by the group said they had clients who were impacted in some way by the shutdown that began on Dec. 22, the organization said today. Among those that reported problems, 9 percent said clients who were federal employees had held back from buying, while 25 percent said buyers pulled out simply because of “economic uncertainty,” according to the report.

The closing of federal offices has reverberated across this city of 87,000, where roughly a third of annual revenue comes from the sales tax. Many of the affected federal workers - including 10,000 people in Utah, 6,200 in West Virginia and 5,500 in Alabama - have salaries far below the average

The shutdown is affecting the Agriculture Department and the National Science Foundation, two of the biggest contributors of federal dollars to the university’s research. “It’s a big deal for us,” said Dan Nordquist, associate vice president for research at the school. In addition, federal workers from the

Jack Lyons, a lifelong space geek who thought he'd hit the jackpot when he got a job as a contractor working on massive rocket test stands for NASA, is spending the furlough on his small side business making props for marching bands. A solid Republican voter until 2016, when he couldn't bring himself to vote for Trump, he's frustrated and saddened by what's going on in Washington.

"They're trying to use people as bargaining chips, and it just isn't right," Lyons said. Unlike civil service workers who expect to eventually get back pay, Lyons doesn't know if he'll ever see a dollar from the shutdown period.

Just back from maternity leave following the birth of her second child, Katie Barron works at home for a private company not connected to the government, but her husband is a National Weather Service meteorologist forced to work without pay because his job is classified as essential.

They're canceling this Saturday's date night to save a couple of hundred dollars, and the purchase of a new refrigerator is on hold. They've also put off home and car maintenance, but the $450-a-week bill for day care still has to be paid, as do the mortgage and utility bills.

"We're a little bit buffered, but our lives are basically based off dual incomes," Barron said.

While Barron frets over the loss of dental and optical insurance because of the shutdown, she said her family has some savings and will be fine for a while. Others are struggling.

Air traffic controllers' union sues over unpaid work during government shutdown

Air traffic controllers' union sues over unpaid work during government shutdown A union that represents thousands of U.S. air traffic controllers filed a lawsuit against the federal government on Friday claiming its failure to pay the workers during an ongoing partial government shutdown could endanger passengers' safety. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); The National Air Traffic Controllers Association said that requiring 16,000 controllers to work without pay violates their constitutional rights and a federal wage law in a lawsuit in federal court in Washington D.C.

But outside the Beltway, the practical fallout from the fact that federal dollars aren’t flowing from Washington to the states is finally sinking in. At least two states that rely heavily on the federal government for tax revenue addressed that hurdle after the last big Washington standoff, over the

From October 1 to October 17, 2013, the United States federal government entered a shutdown and curtailed most routine operations because neither legislation appropriating funds for fiscal year 2014

Redstone Federal Credit Union already has provided hundreds of low-interest loans of as much as $5,000 each to families affected by the shutdown, with no payments due for 60 days, and it's also letting members skip payments on existing loans for a $35 fee, chief marketing officer Fred Trusty said.

"As the days go on, we are seeing more and more traffic head to our branches," he said. The timing of the shutdown couldn't be worse since many families already were stretched thin by holiday spending or starting payments for upcoming summer travel, Trusty said.

Jeff and Sabine Cool, who own a German-style food truck that operates in the heart of the NASA complex, say their income is down about $600 a week since the beginning of the shutdown.

"It kind of hurt a little bit. We're just rolling with the punches," Jeff Cool said Wednesday as he set up tables outside Hildegard's German Wurst Wagon on a bright, windy morning. "I'm glad I'm retired Army and have an additional income, but I feel for the other people."

Cool's sympathy extends to people like Sandra Snell, a TSA officer working without pay at Huntsville International Airport. She hasn't gotten a paycheck since December and wonders what will happen once her savings run out.

The bright spots of the shutdown, she said, are the co-workers who share food and airline passengers who realize that the people checking their identification cards and staffing the X-ray machines are working for free.

"They'll say, 'Thanks for being here.' It helps. It's nice when they realize your value," she said.

Jimmy Kimmel Promises to Put to Work Federal Employees Impacted by Trump’s Government Shutdown.
Jimmy Kimmel marked Day 17 of the government shutdown by inviting one of the nearly 800,000 federal employees working without pay to get a paycheck — by working on Kimmel’s late-night talk show. 

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