US: Judge: Women would lose birth control coverage under rules - PressFrom - US
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USJudge: Women would lose birth control coverage under rules

02:40  12 january  2019
02:40  12 january  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Judge Beetlestone said Pennsylvania had standing to sue the Trump administration because women denied coverage under the new rules were likely to “seek Federal officials estimated that at least 31,700 women could lose contraceptive coverage under the new rules , the judge said, and “there

More than 55 million women have access to birth control without co-payments because of the contraceptive coverage mandate, according to a study commissioned by the Obama administration. Under the new regulations, hundreds of thousands of women could lose those benefits.

Judge: Women would lose birth control coverage under rules© AP Photo FILE - In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, La., wears a birth control pills costume during a protest in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A U.S. judge will hear arguments Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, over California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration that would allow more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. The new rules are set to go into effect on Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A "substantial number" of women would lose birth control coverage under new rules by the Trump administration that allow more employers to opt out of providing the benefit, a U.S. judge said at a hearing on Friday.

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Under this new rule , hundreds of thousands of women would lose their ability to have their birth control costs covered for them.[74] The new rule would let insurers and employers refuse to provide birth control if doing so went against their "religious beliefs" or "moral convictions".[68][69] However

Under the Affordable Care Act , the Obama administration required companies that provide employee health insurance to cover birth control at no additional cost U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone issued an injunction blocking the changes in a stinging ruling Friday supporting a lawsuit brought by

Judge Haywood Gilliam appeared inclined to grant a request by California and other states that he block the rules while the states' lawsuit moves forward. He said he would rule before Monday, when the rules are set to take effect.

The changes would allow more employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing no-cost contraceptive coverage to women by claiming religious objections. Some private employers could also object on moral grounds.

Gilliam said the new rules would be a "massive policy shift" to women who lose coverage.

The judge previously blocked an interim version of the rules — a decision that was upheld in December by an appeals court.

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Opinion polls suggest that the birth control benefit, mandated by the Obama administration under the Judge Haywood S. Gilliam Jr. of the Federal District Court in Oakland, Calif., blocked the rules a The states have not identified any “particular woman who will lose coverage ” as a result of the

Birth control benefits rules for employer-provided coverage . If you work for a religious employer. Health plans sponsored by certain exempt religious employers, like churches and other houses of worship, don’t have to cover contraceptive methods and counseling.

The case is before him again after the administration finalized the measures in November, prompting a renewed legal challenge by California and other states. Twelve other states, including New York and North Carolina, along with Washington, D.C., have joined California in the lawsuit.

At issue is a requirement under President Barack Obama's health care law that birth control services be covered at no additional cost. Obama officials included exemptions for religious organizations and some businesses. The Trump administration expanded those exemptions and added "moral convictions" as a basis to opt out of providing birth control services.

Karli Eisenberg, an attorney for California, told Gilliam Friday the loss of free contraceptive coverage from employers would force women to turn to government programs that provide birth control, and if they are ineligible for those, increase the risk of unintended pregnancies.

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More women are rushing to get free birth control across the country. Many are worried they'll lose it once President Many are worried they'll lose it once President Trump repeals the Affordable Care Act. Marco Rubio Breaks Out in Spanish at Senate GOP Presser on H&HS Contraception Ruling

Millions of women could lose their contraceptive coverage as a result of Donald Trump's birth control policy. When the first rumors of a final rule for the “ Coverage Of Certain Preventive Services Under The Affordable Care Act [ACA]” began leaking to the media, it was assumed that the birth control

"It's undisputed that these rules will create barriers," she said.

The rules violate the Affordable Care Act, including a provision that forbids discrimination, she said.

Justin Sandberg, an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, said the health care law already had exemptions for contraceptive coverage that left millions of women without the benefit. He said the birth control requirement was a "substantial burden" on employers with religious objections.

The rules "protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objectors from being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs," the U.S. Department of Justice said in court documents.

The states argue that millions of women could lose free birth control services under the new rules. They want Gilliam to issue a preliminary injunction blocking the rules for the entire nation.

Gilliam questioned whether a nationwide injunction was appropriate. He noted that a federal judge in Massachusetts had ruled against a similar challenge to the birth control rules, but a nationwide injunction would nonetheless block them in that state.

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