•   
  •   
  •   

USYellowstone Is Warning People Not to Introduce Invasive Species

17:10  01 may  2019
17:10  01 may  2019 Source:   newsweek.com

How a scoop of 'DNA soup' from our waterways could help preserve biodiversity

How a scoop of 'DNA soup' from our waterways could help preserve biodiversity Just like a criminal leaves traces of their DNA at a crime scene, animals from platypus to crayfish leave traces of their DNA everywhere they go, and this can be used to track biodiversity.

"Aquatic invasive species pose a grave and growing threat to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and surrounding economies," a park statement read. Invasive species such as dreissenid mussels have already caused irreversible damage to waterways in the Midwestern and eastern United States

Climate change is putting this invasive species to good use: Aussie rodent becomes first 'climate change extinction' Australia officially declared a Gr And when steep slopes, houses or roads are located landward of a marsh, it can’t migrate inland. Yellowstone Is Warning People Not to

As Yellowstone National Park prepares for the start of the boating and fishing season on May 25, officials have reminded visitors of several requirements that are in place to help prevent the spread of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS,) which can be severely damaging to the local ecosystem.

According to a park statement, anglers and boaters should clean, drain and dry all equipment before arriving so as to mitigate the risk of introducing any of such species to Yellowstone's waterways in the states of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho.

How a scoop of 'DNA soup' from our waterways could help preserve biodiversity

How a scoop of 'DNA soup' from our waterways could help preserve biodiversity Just like a criminal leaves traces of their DNA at a crime scene, animals from platypus to crayfish leave traces of their DNA everywhere they go, and this can be used to track biodiversity.

Invasive species are among the leading threats to native wildlife. Learn about how they spread and how they threaten native wildlife in the United States. For example, lake trout are native to the Great Lakes, but are considered to be an invasive species in Yellowstone Lake in Wyoming because they

An invasive species is a species that is not native to a specific location (an introduced species ), and that has a tendency to spread to a degree believed to cause damage to the environment

“Aquatic invasive species pose a grave and growing threat to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem and surrounding economies,” a park statement read. “AIS can quickly and drastically alter habitats and food webs, causing declines in sport fish and food resources for native wildlife."

Invasive species such as dreissenid mussels have already caused irreversible damage to waterways in the Midwestern and eastern United States and the Colorado River drainage area.

“If non-native mussels are found in Yellowstone, park waters may close to all watercraft—except authorized National Park Service boats—to prevent the spread to other waterways,” the statement read.

Park officials say there are a number of requirements for visitors who plan to use Yellowstone’s waterways.

New strategy aims to save sagebrush in Western states

New strategy aims to save sagebrush in Western states Federal officials have released a plan to save sagebrush habitats in Western states that support cattle ranching, recreation and 350 wildlife species, including imperiled sage grouse. Officials say the 248-page document released this month is a paradigm shift relying on advances in technology and analytics to categorize sagebrush areas based on resistance and resiliency to wildfire.

Invasive animal species represent a crisis for United States national parks, experts have said, in a call for widespread, systemic action. The impacts of invasive animal species vary, but they can cause a loss of park wildlife, damage natural ecosystems, hurt visitor experiences and be expensive to control.

Yellowstone Warns Visitors Not to Introduce Invasive Species . Researchers have found that invasive birds play a critical role in the ecosystem of the Hawaiian island of Oahu, where native species have almost totally disappeared.

Firstly, all plants, animals, sand, mud, and other debris, must be cleaned from your boat, trailer, anchor, boots, and equipment, as soon as you leave a body of water. All gear must be cleaned before you leave the area where you fished.

Secondly, all the water must be drained from your boat, including the motor, bilge, live-well, and other compartments before arrival at the park. The bilge plug must be left out during transport. Water or organisms should not be dumped from one water body to another.

Finally, all compartments and equipment must be dried in the sun for at least five days before entering another body of water. Alternatively, boats, trailers, waders, boots and equipment should cleaned with high pressure, hot (120 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit,) water if allowed by the owner’s manuals.

Bleach should not be used for cleaning watercraft or recreational equipment because of the potential risks to the environment and human health.

U.S. to Consider Listing Giraffes as Endangered Species

U.S. to Consider Listing Giraffes as Endangered Species Federal wildlife officials said Thursday that they would officially consider listing the giraffe as an endangered species, a move long sought by conservationists alarmed by the African mammal’s precipitous decline and a growing domestic market for giraffe products. .

Invasive species may also be able to exploit a resource that native species cannot use, which allows them to take hold in the new environment. Yellow starthistle has also been introduced to the West Coast and secretes the chemical compound 8-hydroxyquinoline from the root.5 This chemical harms

And how do we triage invasive species that slip the net? That is important because species can spread quickly through international trade and the effects of climate change. Most species accidentally introduced here, such as scorpions, in crates of fruit, would never survive in the long term.

Furthermore, the park has introduced a temporary ban this year on watercraft equipped with sealed internal ballast tanks—which are used to produce specific wakes for waterskiing and wakeboarding.

“Boats with sealed internal water ballast tanks are extremely difficult to clean and drain, even with our rigorous inspection and decontamination efforts,” Sue Mills, AIS Coordinator at Yellowstone, said in a statement. “While fewer than two dozen of these boats entered the park last year, we believe the ban is prudent because they pose a high risk of AIS transmission into park waters.”

Officials are also urging visitors to report any invasive species that they see, by taking a picture, noting the location and contacting the park as soon as possible.

Currently, there are thought to be eight aquatic invasive species in Yellowstone’s waters, including the New Zealand mud snail, another species of snail known as the red-rimmed melania, five non-native fish—such as lake trout—and a parasite known as Myxobolus cerebralis which causes whirling disease in fish.

Wild raccoon moves into German zoo; keepers can't expel it

Wild raccoon moves into German zoo; keepers can't expel it A wild raccoon has moved into Heidelberg Zoo in Germany and keepers can't kick him out. 

Sometimes they introduced species that didn’t have that much of an impact on native environments, but all too often, as Number 10: Yellowstone Wolves. Now this example is a perfect example of how people ’s actions and decisions can have a continuous negative impact on local environments.

An invasive species is an introduced organism that is not native to an area and causes ecological and/or economic damage in their new environment. However, many exotics species have become invasive around the world, resulting in a great deal of environmental and economic damage.

Yellowstone Is Warning People Not to Introduce Invasive Species© Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Related Articles

  • Invasive Birds Have Taken Over This Hawaiian Island. Now They're Playing a Key Role in the Ecosystem
  • Invasive Tick Species Capable of Spreading Dangerous Diseases Found in Nine States
  • Invasive, Aggressive Mosquito Population ‘Explodes’ Across Long Beach, California

Sign up to our newsletter and get Newsweek stories delivered to your e-mail

Read More

An extinct bird species has evolved back into existence, study says.
It's an example of iterative evolution — when the same ancestral lineage leads to repeated evolution of a species at different points in time . The rare phenomenon means that species can re-emerge over and over, despite past iterations going extinct. The flightless bird — a descendant of a species of flying bird known as the white-throated rail — was completely wiped out when the island disappeared below sea level about 136,000 years ago.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!