US: Abortion Funds Bombarded With Donations in Panic Over Alabama Ban - - PressFrom - US
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USAbortion Funds Bombarded With Donations in Panic Over Alabama Ban

03:15  16 may  2019
03:15  16 may  2019 Source:   thedailybeast.com

Alabama Senate to vote on bill banning abortion

Alabama Senate to vote on bill banning abortion Alabama Senate to vote on bill banning abortion

Alabama ’s new law mandating an almost blanket ban on abortion , the strictest in the United States, was passed by this group of exclusively white, male politicians. Of the 27 Republicans, all white men, that dominate the 35-seat Alabama senate, 25 voted to pass the bill late on Tuesday.

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Abortion Funds Bombarded With Donations in Panic Over Alabama Ban© Provided by The Daily Beast Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

The extreme anti-abortion bill signed into law in Alabama on Wednesday sent shock waves far across state lines, crystallizing the growing challenge to Roe v. Wade and triggering record donations to groups bent on making sure women can safely end unwanted pregnancies.

Late Tuesday, Alabama lawmakers voted in a ban on almost all abortions in the state, even in cases of rape or incest. Gov. Kay Ivey signed it Wednesday, making it the strictest law in the nation—and a potential threat to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision making the procedure legal across the U.S.

Dem Senate leader on abortion vote: 'It's a sad day in Alabama'

Dem Senate leader on abortion vote: 'It's a sad day in Alabama' A Democratic Alabama lawmaker called it a sad day for the state after the state Senate approved legislation outlawing abortion, including in cases of rape and incest. "It's a sad day in Alabama; I feel like crying," state Senate Minority Leader Bobby Singleton (D) said Tuesday. "But I'm going to hold back my tears, because what you just said to my little girl is that it's OK for a man to rape you, and you've got to have his baby if you get pregnant. You just said to my little girl ... you don't matter in the state of Alabama.

Montgomery, Ala. – Alabama lawmakers were debating a proposal to outlaw almost all abortions in the state Tuesday ahead of a vote on the hardline measure that has splintered Republicans over its lack of an exception for pregnancies resulting from rape or incest.

Alabama ’s Senate passed a near-total ban on abortion on May 14, sending what would be the nation’s most stringent abortion law to the state’s Republican Governor. The GOP-dominated Senate voted 25-6 to make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony punishable by up to 99 years or

Although conservative state legislatures have been chipping away at abortion access for nearly a decade, what happened in Alabama—on the heels of a severe new law in Georgia—was so draconian it served as a kind of emergency flare.

“I’ve been getting calls from news networks all over the world that are watching Alabama right now,” said Jenna King, an organizer with Alabama Reproductive Rights Advocates. “I think it’s important to understand that what we’re doing is so inherently unthinkable that the world is just trying to understand it.”

“We’re getting calls from BBC and Al Jazeera to cover this,” Barbara Anne Luttrell, the communications director for Planned Parenthood Southeast, told The Daily Beast. “It’s usual and it feels a bit bizarre, but it’s really sad that’s it’s not for something that’s improving the lives of people in these states.”

2020 Democrats warn Alabama portends larger abortion fight

2020 Democrats warn Alabama portends larger abortion fight Democratic presidential candidates are condemning Alabama's approval of a ban on nearly all abortions.

For over four decades, Congress in annual appropriation bills has banned government health programs like Medicaid from using federal dollars for abortions The Senate bill would have made permanent the ban — known as the Hyde amendment — and add new provisions banning federal subsidies for

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama ’s Senate passed a near-total ban on abortion Tuesday, sending what would be the nation’s most stringent abortion law to the state’s Republican governor. The GOP-dominated Senate voted 25-6 to make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony

Experts have long warned that laws like those in Alabama and Georgia are designed to bring a challenge to Roe v. Wade before the Supreme Court’s new conservative majority. But Alabama’s ban really drove the point home.

“The Fight Over Abortion Is Now Total War” headlines blared. Hillary Clinton called the bill an “appalling attacks on women's lives.” At least 12 Democratic presidential contenders condemned it, and #MeToo figures like Alyssa Milano and Rose McGowan urged their followers to act. Chris Evans, the actor best known for his portrayal of Captain America, chimed in, tweeting, “If you’re not worried about roe v wade, you’re not paying attention.”

For many, the impulse to do something meant opening their wallets.

Mia Raven, the director of the P.O.W.E.R. House, which offers childcare, housing and escorts for patients at a clinic in Montgomery, said she was distracted all day by cell phone chimes alerting her that someone new had donated.

Pat Robertson: Alabama 'has gone too far' with 'extreme' abortion law

Pat Robertson: Alabama 'has gone too far' with 'extreme' abortion law Televangelist Pat Robertson, who is opposed to abortion, criticized an anti-abortion bill passed by the Alabama legislature Tuesday as "extreme.""I think Alabama has gone too far," he said during a Wednesday appearance on "The 700 Club", referencing the bill's 99-year maximum sentence for doctors who perform abortions and the fact that it does not provide exceptions for rape or incest cases. He added that he does not think the bill would be upheld by the Supreme Court. "It's an extreme law and they want to challenge Roe vs. Wade but my humble view is that this is not the case we want to bring to the Supreme Court because I think this one will lose," he said.

A reproductive-rights protester disrupts an anti- abortion rally. Photo: 2019 Getty Images. Late Tuesday night, Alabama passed the most restrictive abortion bill in the country: a near-full ban on the procedure, with no exceptions for cases of rape or incest.

We are currently funding Arizona residents seeking abortion care in Phoenix; we focus on people who are more than 16 weeks pregnant and (or) are facing multiple barriers to their abortion care (ex: transportation, lodging, child care). Services are available in English and Spanish.

“It started last night basically and just kept going,” she said. “This is probably the most we’ve gotten in one day, ever.”

In fact, both P.O.W.E.R. House and the Yellowhammer Fund—an organization that helps pay for abortions and transportation—told The Daily Beast they’d broken fundraising records in the last 24 hours. One activist alone collected more than $28,000 in donations for Yellowhammer in three hours. The National Network of Abortion Funds, received 3,500 donations totaling more than $106,000 in the last two days, executive director Yamani Hernandez told the Daily Beast. The donations account for 20 percent of their total number of donations in the last year.

The National Abortion Federation, which live-tweeted the Senate debate over the ban, said someone donated $100 in the name of the bill’s sponsor. The ACLU and Planned Parenthood—both of which plan to sue to block the ban—would not comment on how much money they’d raised, but said they saw an influx of support this week.

Yellowhammer Fund President Amanda Reyes said her organization planned to use the money to fund abortions in Alabama and, if it becomes impossible to get one in the state, in the surrounding areas. The organization has already transported women who passed Alabama’s 15-week cut-off for abortions into neighboring states.

RNC chair says she personally opposes Alabama abortion law

RNC chair says she personally opposes Alabama abortion law “Personally, I would have the exceptions,” Ronna McDaniel said. “That's my personal belief."

Alabama sent the most restrictive abortion bill in the country to the governor's desk Tuesday night, with the state's Senate passing legislation that could punish doctors who perform abortions with life in prison.

Alabama sent the most restrictive abortion bill in the country to date to the governor's desk Tuesday night, with the state's Senate passing legislation that could punish doctors who perform abortions with life in prison. MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama ’s Senate passed a near-total ban on abortion

“We’re well-practiced in getting people out of state to get abortion care already,“ Reyes told The Daily Beast. “We can make abortion free and available on demand to people despite our state legislatures, despite our federal legislature, and despite our lawmakers, because we have the money and the resources to make that possible for people.”

“That is what people in the U.S. and across the world are saying: That abortion should be accessible, regardless of whether or not it’s legal,” she added.

There were downsides to the increased attention as well. Just as in Georgia after the six-week ban passed, clinics in Alabama faced a deluge of calls from patients wondering if they could still come in for their appointments. Dramatic headlines about a “near-total abortion ban” had some patients worried that the procedure was already illegal.

“I’ve been encouraging people to shout from the rooftops that abortion is still legal in Alabama and it will be until the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade,” King said Wednesday.

But there is concern over how long Roe v. Wade would last under the new Supreme Court majority. In a press call with Planned Parenthood leaders, reporters wondered whether suing over the ban was counterproductive. If bringing a challenge to Roe v. Wade before the high court was the GOP’s intention, wouldn’t mounting a lawsuit play straight into their hands?

“We have no choice,” Planned Parenthood CEO Leana Wen replied.

Despite the national panic, advocates in Alabama seemed remarkably unfazed. Reyes said her fund would continue their work as usual. Raven, the director of P.O.W.E.R. House, said she was confident the law wouldn’t pass muster in the courts.

“I think people are expecting me to be crying,” she said. “This is another day in Alabama. This is a thing that happens every year. We always have to sue the state and we always win.”

And even if they didn’t win, she added, “we are not going anywhere.”

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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ACLU, Planned Parenthood sue over Alabama abortion ban.
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit on Friday challenging a law enacted by Alabama last week that bans nearly all abortions and makes performing the procedure a felony punishable by up to 99 years in prison. The lawsuit is one of several the groups have filed or are preparing to file against states that recently passed strict anti-abortion measures in an effort to prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark case that guarantees a woman's constitutional right to abortion.

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