US: FAA defends handling of Boeing 737 Max after deadly crashes - PressFrom - US
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USFAA defends handling of Boeing 737 Max after deadly crashes

03:45  16 may  2019
03:45  16 may  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

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In March 2019, airlines and regulators worldwide imposed Boeing 737 MAX groundings after two nearly new Boeing 737 MAX passenger airliners crashed within five months

The Federal Aviation Administration made its intervention even as the Ethiopian government noted similarities between the crash earlier this month near The FAA said in a statement: “While Boeing 737 MAX training requirements do not address the MCAS by name, the requirements do include the

FAA defends handling of Boeing 737 Max after deadly crashes© JASON REDMOND / REUTERS Boeing 737 MAX 8

Washington — The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration on Wednesday told Congress that Boeing's 737 Max will not fly again until the government is confident it is safe. All 737s were grounded in the U.S. after two deadly crashes.

FAA officials also defended their agency against accusations they allowed Boeing to rush the 737 Max into production.

Investigators believe Boeing's new MCAS anti-stall system was connected to two crashes: one in Indonesia last October and one in Ethiopia in March. The crashes killed a total of 346 people and grounded the 737 Max worldwide.

Boeing says has completed software update for 737 MAX jets

Boeing says has completed software update for 737 MAX jets Boeing says has completed software update for 737 MAX jets

There are 74 Boeing 737 Max 8s registered to fly in the United States, according to the FAA . "If we identify an issue that affects safety, the FAA will Out of an abundance of caution for the flying public, the @FAANews should ground the 737 MAX 8 until we investigate the causes of recent crashes and

President Trump announced Wednesday the FAA would ground all Boeing 737 Max planes. The decision comes after an Ethiopian Airlines crash killed 157 people.

"Once we are convinced absolutely of the safety of return to service, we will do it," said Daniel Elwell, the FAA's acting administrator.

The parents of Samya Stumo, 24, worry that process will be rushed too. Stumo was killed in the Ethiopian Airlines crash.

"How could you possibly finish the required analysis and investigation by August," asked Nadia Milleron, Samya's mother.

Milleron said she doesn't think the plane should go back in the air anytime soon. "We don't have the information about it," she said.

CBS News obtained audio of American Airlines pilots complaining to a Boeing official last year that even they were not informed about the new system.

"Somebody at the corporate level made the decision that this isn't important to brief our pilots on. People who fly airplanes for us," a pilot said.

Ethiopian crash might have been prevented if Boeing took us seriously, pilot union said

Ethiopian crash might have been prevented if Boeing took us seriously, pilot union said American Airline's pilots' union is calling Boeing's response to two fatal plane crashes "inexcusable," claiming the crashes might not have happened if the company had listened to pilots. Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for Allied Pilots Association — a union of American Airlines pilots — told CNN Business that Boeing had "a poisoned, diseased philosophy" for a global company. "Shame on you... we're going to call you out on it," Tajer said. Boeing did not comment on the union's position early Thursday morning.

The news conference, held after Boeing ’s annual meeting in Chicago, came as new Southwest said it found out only after the first crash of the Lion Air Max . Boeing said the feature only worked Dennis Tajer, a 737 pilot and union spokesman, said Boeing and the FAA must require more training rather

Federal Aviation Administration managers pushed its engineers to delegate wide responsibility for assessing the safety of the 737 MAX to Boeing itself. But safety engineers familiar with the documents

Boeing sources told CBS News they're convinced that a bird strike shortly after takeoff sparked the chain of events that brought down the Ethiopian Air flight. But Ethiopian investigators said they found no evidence a sensor was damaged by a foreign object.

Two dead after float plane crashes in Alaska.
The pilot and passenger were the only people on board, the Ketchikan Gateway Borough said.

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