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USStates passing abortion bans have among the lowest rates of women in power

08:25  16 may  2019
08:25  16 may  2019 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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The proposed bans passed by state legislatures or signed into law so far this year have not gone into effect in any state and are facing various legal challenges. That equates to women making up 13.8% of the Mississippi state Legislature. The only state that recently passed an abortion restriction that

The only state that recently passed an abortion restriction that ranks in the top half of the country in gender representation is Georgia. They come in 20th place in CAWP's rankings, with 15 women among the 56 state senators and 57 women in the 180-seat House. Gallup reports that in 2018, 31

When the Alabama state Senate passed a controversial bill that would ban most abortions, not one of the four female state senators voted for it.

Stricter abortion bans are conservative-led states' gambit to overturn Roe vs. Wade

Stricter abortion bans are conservative-led states' gambit to overturn Roe vs. Wade ATLANTA - When Republican lawmakers in Alabama weighed a stringent new bill that would outlaw almost all abortions, they did not pretend that it complied with federal law or that it would go into effect anytime soon. "Yes, it's unconstitutional," state House Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor, said last week at a hearing. "All our pro-life bills are unconstitutional right now. 

States such as Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi pushing for strict bans on abortion also tend to have high rates of infant and maternal mortality. A growing number of states have been passing highly restrictive abortion legislation aimed at overturning Roe V. Wade.

When the Alabama State Senate passed their controversial bill which would ban most abortions , not one of the four female state senators voted for it.

The fact that there are only four female state senators in the Heart of Dixie comes as little surprise to political observers, as the state ranks among the lowest in terms of female representation in state legislatures.

The same is true for Kentucky, Mississippi and Ohio, three of the four states that passed abortion bans or so-called "heartbeat" bills that aim to ban abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can be as soon as six weeks, at which point some women may not know they're pregnant.

Representation in politics has an impact on a number of topics, including abortion, where views may differ between men and women.

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Abortion ban reaction: Democrats erupt, Republicans stay quiet as both sides see an impact in the 2020 election The Democratic presidential contenders cast the nation’s strictest ban as a severe blow to women’s rights, while Republicans on the ballot in 2020 did not want to talk about it

also? highest rates of poverty, infant mortality, maternal mortality I could go on. Just give women 10 years to run everything.

Other restrictive bans have been passed in Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri The state also moved to close the state 's only abortion clinic. Planned Parenthood, which runs " The lower courts are going to find these laws unconstitutional because the Supreme Court

(MORE: Alabama Senate approves country’s most restrictive abortion ban)

Jean Sinzdak, associate director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, told ABC News when it comes to a whole range of policy issues, "research has shown that women legislators bring different perspectives. They bring their own life experience to bear on whatever the topic is, and they are more likely to bring marginalized voices into the policy conversation."

"Abortion is an issue in which women on both sides of the aisle are particularly passionate, and they feel that they, as women, are best suited to speak to it because of its direct effect on women. However, it's one those issues where it's very clear that women are not monolithic and they feel very differently about what the solution is," Sinzdak said.

According to data compiled by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, Alabama ranks 47th in terms of female representation, with 15.7% women in their state legislature on the whole.

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Abortion rights: Why it's hard to gauge Americans' support Republican-run state governments are clearly aiming for a Supreme Court showdown over Roe v. Wade. Georgia recently passed a law banning most abortions after six weeks, and Alabama just passed a near-total abortion ban. Both efforts are part of more than a dozen such successful and unsuccessful attempts this year. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Not surprisingly, the blowback has been stiff from abortion rights groups and politicians. Some have even called for a boycott of Georgia.

(MORE: States passing abortion bans have among the lowest rates of women in power ). She added that in addition to a lack of apparent understanding of reproductive health some anti- abortion lawmakers have shown, they are also acting against the wishes of the people.

The state -by- state effort to confront abortion restrictions continues a decades-long, largely women -led movement that has fought for reproductive rights. She said the group had received an influx of calls from hundreds of women unsure if they could still access abortion and other Planned Parenthood

There are four women in the 35 seats in the state Senate and 18 women in the 105 seats in the House of Representatives.

Abortion bills push women's reproductive rights into political spotlight

Abortion bills push women's reproductive rights into political spotlight Eight months after the contentious hearings over Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, progressives fear that the most dire warnings of abortion rights groups are now coming to fruition. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); This week, Alabama passed the country's most restrictive abortion ban, soon followed by Missouri passing its own strict anti-abortion legislation.

(MORE: 41 states have tried to pass abortion restrictions this year, as Georgia votes on a new ban: Report)

"We're talking about 25 white men who just voted to make health and life decisions for women," Dr. Leana Wen, the president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, said during a call with reporters Wednesday.

The proposed bans passed by state legislatures or signed into law so far this year have not gone into effect in any state and are facing various legal challenges.

Ohio, which passed a so-called "heartbeat" ban in April, ranks 30th in gender representation, with just over a quarter -- 26.2% -- of their state legislature being women. Of the 33 seats in the Ohio state Senate, eight are held by women, and 27 of the 99 seats in the state's House of Representatives are held by women.

Kentucky, where the governor signed a "heartbeat" ban in March, ranks 41st in the country, with four women in their 38-seat Senate and 27 in the 100 seats in their House of Representatives.

Hundreds protest Alabama's abortion ban at state capitol

Hundreds protest Alabama's abortion ban at state capitol Hundreds of demonstrators marched to the Alabama Capitol on Sunday to protest the state's newly approved abortion ban, chanting "my body, my choice!" and "vote them out!"The demonstration came days after Gov. Kay Ivey signed the most stringent abortion law in the nation— making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases unless necessary for the mother's health. The law provides no exception for rape and incest. "Banning abortion does not stop abortion. It stops safe abortion," said Staci Fox, CEO and president of Planned Parenthood Southeast, addressing the cheering crowd outside the Alabama Capitol.

(MORE: Federal judge strikes down Kentucky law to curtail 2nd-trimester abortions)

Coming in last place is Mississippi, where a 15-week abortion bill was deemed unconstitutional. There are nine women in Mississippi's state Senate and 15 women in the 122 seats of their House of Representatives. That equates to women making up 13.8% of the Mississippi state Legislature.

The only state that recently passed an abortion restriction that ranks in the top half of the country in gender representation is Georgia. They come in 20th place in CAWP's rankings, with 15 women among the 56 state senators and 57 women in the 180-seat House.

Gallup reports that in 2018, 31% of women and 27% of men felt abortion should be legal under any circumstances, while 46% of women and 54% of men reported feeling abortion should be legal under certain circumstances.

Jeff Jones, a senior editor for Gallup, told ABC News the difference between opinions of men and women may not be as dramatic as some might expect because those stark contrasts tend to run along party lines, not gender lines.

(MORE: Georgia becomes latest state to sign so-called 'heartbeat' abortion ban)

"Even though women are more Democratic than men, there are still 36% of women who are Republican or Republican leaning, so it's not a monolithically Democratic group," Jones said.

Indeed, the Alabama House bill had a woman, Rep. Terri Collins, as its primary sponsor, and it's awaiting the signature of a female governor. Both women are in the Republican Party.

The Gallup data did not break down the preferences by state or region, but the Pew Research Center reported in 2014 that half of adults in most southern states believed abortion should be legal in all or most cases, while that number was about or more than half in other states.

Specifically, the Pew data reported that 37% of adults in Alabama, 36% of adults in Kentucky and Mississippi, and 48% of adults in Georgia and Ohio believed it should be legal in all or most cases.

"Generally speaking, women are better represented in places where there are more opportunities, so when you have a larger legislature, there's literally more seats to run for," Sinzdak said. "That helps, that definitely helps."

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White Women Are Helping States Pass Abortion Restrictions.
Their support for Republican officials has been key to the GOP’s strength in the South.

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