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USMen cast every vote for Alabama's restrictive abortion law

15:20  16 may  2019
15:20  16 may  2019 Source:   cbsnews.com

Abortion restricting bills inch closer to becoming laws in Alabama, Georgia

Abortion restricting bills inch closer to becoming laws in Alabama, Georgia The expected signing of the bill in Georgia, slated for Tuesday, comes after much uproar over the bill, including threats from within the film and television industry. Georgia is one of several states that have pushed for bans prohibiting abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected -- which can be as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and when some women may not yet know they are pregnant. However, no such ban has actually gone into effect as they have been stopped by legal challenges.

Alabama just criminalized abortions – and every single yes vote was cast by a white man . By Danielle Garrand. Twenty-five members of the Alabama State Senate voted to pass the nation' s most restrictive abortion bill on Tuesday — and every single one of them were white men .

Alabama just criminalized abortions – and every single yes vote was cast by a white man . By Danielle Garrand. Twenty-five members of the Alabama State Senate voted to pass the nation' s most restrictive abortion bill on Tuesday — and every single one of them were white men .

Men cast every vote for Alabama's restrictive abortion law© Alabama Legislature website my-post.png

Twenty-five members of the Alabama State Senate voted to pass the nation's most restrictive abortion bill on Tuesday — and every single one of them were white men. On Wednesday, the state's Republican female governor, Kay Ivey, signed the bill into law.

After hours of discussion, the Senate on Tuesday passed the near-total abortion ban in a 25 to 6 vote. Of the 35 senators in the state, four are women, and they are all Democrats.

All 25 of the male senators to vote "yes" on the bill were Republicans. Of the eight Democrats in leadership, six voted "nay" on the bill -- including two female senators, Linda Coleman-Madison and Vivian Davis Figures. Three senators, two Republicans and Democrat Sen. Priscilla Dunn, did not vote or were not present for the vote. Democrat Sen. Malika Sanders-Fortier abstained from voting.

Dem Senate leader on abortion vote: 'It's a sad day in Alabama'

Dem Senate leader on abortion vote: 'It's a sad day in Alabama' A Democratic Alabama lawmaker called it a sad day for the state after the state Senate approved legislation outlawing abortion, including in cases of rape and incest. "It's a sad day in Alabama; I feel like crying," state Senate Minority Leader Bobby Singleton (D) said Tuesday. "But I'm going to hold back my tears, because what you just said to my little girl is that it's OK for a man to rape you, and you've got to have his baby if you get pregnant. You just said to my little girl ... you don't matter in the state of Alabama.

Amid the debate on the Alabama Senate floor over America’ s most restrictive abortion law , state Sen. Linda Coleman-Madison (D) appeared to be losing The Alabama abortion bill is the most harsh yet. It would allow abortion only if the mother’ s health was in critical danger, banning it virtually at the

Alabama ’ s governor on Wednesday signed into law a measure to ban most abortions in the state. The expected legal battle could stop the restrictions entirely, or at least substantially delay them. “ Alabama politicians will forever live in infamy for this vote , and we will make sure that every woman

Ivey, the state's second female governor, tweeted a photo of herself signing the bill with the caption "To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief that every life is precious & that every life is a sacred gift from God."

House Bill 314, known as the "Human Life Protection Act" prohibits abortion or attempted abortion in Alabama, except "in cases where abortion is necessary in order to prevent a serious health risk to the unborn child's mother," according to the bill.

Pat Robertson: Alabama 'has gone too far' with 'extreme' abortion law

Pat Robertson: Alabama 'has gone too far' with 'extreme' abortion law Televangelist Pat Robertson, who is opposed to abortion, criticized an anti-abortion bill passed by the Alabama legislature Tuesday as "extreme.""I think Alabama has gone too far," he said during a Wednesday appearance on "The 700 Club", referencing the bill's 99-year maximum sentence for doctors who perform abortions and the fact that it does not provide exceptions for rape or incest cases. He added that he does not think the bill would be upheld by the Supreme Court. "It's an extreme law and they want to challenge Roe vs. Wade but my humble view is that this is not the case we want to bring to the Supreme Court because I think this one will lose," he said.

Alabama ’ s state Senate voted and approved one of the most controversial and restrictive abortion laws in the country. The Alabama measure does not provide any exemptions for cases of rape or incest

Alabama governor signs near-total abortion ban into law . During the debate leading up to the vote on Tuesday evening, Senate Minority Leader Bobby Singleton proposed an amendment that would have carved out an exception for victims of rape and incest.

It criminalizes the procedure, reclassifying abortion as a Class A felony, punishable by up to 99 years in prison for doctors. Attempted abortions will be reclassified as a Class C penalty. The legislation doesn't make an exceptions for victims or rape or incest.

Rep. Terri Collins, a Republican, sponsored the bill in the House, which voted 74-3 to approve it in April. All six Republican women voted for the measure.

Abortion rights advocates have promised to challenge Alabama's controversial legislation long before November, when the law is scheduled to be implemented.

Alabama's ban is just the most recent in a barrage of anti-abortion measures at state level. Last week, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed into law the state's so-called "fetal heartbeat" bill, legislation that will prohibit abortions after a heartbeat is detected in an embryo, which is usually about five to six weeks into a pregnancy -- before most women know they're pregnant. The state was the sixth to pass such a law, and the fourth this year alone.

Read More

Nevada lawmakers close to repealing tough abortion rules.
Nevada lawmakers are bucking a national trend of anti-abortion laws by voting to repeal requirements that physicians document a pregnant woman's marital status and tell her about the "emotional implications" of an abortion. 

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