US: White FDNY lieutenant sues department, Vulcan Society claiming racial discrimination in color guard - PressFrom - US
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USWhite FDNY lieutenant sues department, Vulcan Society claiming racial discrimination in color guard

03:45  19 may  2019
03:45  19 may  2019 Source:   nydailynews.com

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The Vulcan Society , founded in 1940, is a fraternal organization of black firefighters in New York City . On December 6, 1898, a colored man, 27-year-old William E. Nicholson, was appointed to a paid position as fireman and assigned to a firehouse in Brooklyn.

The Vulcan Society was established in 1940 by a group of Black firefighters who were bound by their opposition to the blatant racial discrimination practiced in the early FDNY . The Vulcan Society Inc. is the fraternal organization of Black Firefighters open only to active and retired members of EMS

White FDNY lieutenant sues department, Vulcan Society claiming racial discrimination in color guard© Barry Williams

A white firefighter charged in a new lawsuit that his civil rights were violated by his racially-motivated exclusion from an FDNY color guard honoring black department members.

Lt. Daniel McWilliams, in a Brooklyn Federal Court suit filed Friday, alleged that he was callously booted from serving as a flag bearer at the Nov. 19, 2017, memorial Mass for deceased members of the Vulcan Society — a group for black firefighters within the FDNY.

“Lieutenant, I specifically requested an all-black color guard,” said one-time society president Regina Wilson, according to the lawsuit.

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An FDNY first responder pictured in an iconic 9/11 photo is alleging he was the victim of anti- white discrimination after he was kicked out of an “all-black” “I want to have an all-black color guard .” After the incident, McWilliams filed a complaint with the FDNY , charging Wilson with discrimination .

NEW YORK – The de Blasio Administration today announced an agreement to settle the 2007 Vulcan Society ’s lawsuit against the City of New York over two civil service exams The FDNY ’s Vulcan Society claimed the same disparate impact and asserted intentional discrimination claims as well.

“Are you removing me from the color guard because I am not black?” replied McWilliams, a 29-year FDNY veteran assigned to its ceremonial unit.

“Yes I am,” the court papers quote Wilson as replying.

According to the lawsuit, the “racially-charged exchanges” were overheard by McWilliams’ friends and colleagues and the firefighter left the church “to save himself from further shame, humiliation and embarrassment.”

McWilliams was one of three FDNY members in a memorable post-9/11 photo showing the trio raising an American flag amid the rubble at Ground Zero. He first filed a complaint about the memorial incident with the FDNY in January 2018.

“As a result of the defendants’ conduct, (McWilliams) has suffered severe shame, emotional distress and damage to his reputation,” the lawsuit charged. “Defendant Wilson ... intentionally, maliciously and publicly stripped the plaintiff of (his) prestigious honor ... on account of his race.”

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Vulcan Society FDNY . 739 Eastern Pkwy, Brooklyn (NY), 11213, United States. Fire Department officials imposed a one year moratorium on transfers in hope that the men would adjust to Wesley. Williams was promoted to Lieutenant in 1927, Captain in 1934 and Battalion Chief in 1938.

New York City also had the least diverse fire department of any major city in America – only 7.4 percent Black and Latino. At the time, 57 percent of Los racial discrimination in the workplace. The Vulcans also ask for million in compensatory damages for the thousands of Black victims of the

The court filing seeks a jury trial to set compensatory and punitive damages against the Vulcan Society, the FDNY, Wilson and the City of New York.

“We will review the complaint once we are served and respond accordingly," said a spokesman for the city Law Department.

Emails to the Vulcan Society and the FDNY for comment were not returned Saturday, and Wilson did not respond to texts and calls about the lawsuit.

The court filing goes on to detail how Wilson, during an investigation by the FDNY’s Equal Employment Opportunity Office, asserted that she held the power to request an all-black color guard for the event — and to boot any white members who appeared at the memorial.

White FDNY lieutenant sues department, Vulcan Society claiming racial discrimination in color guard© Todd Maisel

The FDNY Bureau of Legal Affairs, arguing against McWilliams, contended his dismissal from the color guard was a non-discriminatory “subtle exclusion” of the plaintiff. But McWilliams accused the FDNY of “once again turning a blind eye to discrimination and creating a double-standard within the FDNY.”

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