US: San Francisco police chief apologizes for raid on journalist's home - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

USSan Francisco police chief apologizes for raid on journalist's home

05:45  25 may  2019
05:45  25 may  2019 Source:   thehill.com

SF District Attorney Gascón questions SF police raid on journalist

SF District Attorney Gascón questions SF police raid on journalist San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón on Monday questioned the police raid of a journalist’s home earlier this month, saying he “can’t imagine a situation in which a search warrant would be appropriate.” Officers executed search warrants at freelance videographer Bryan Carmody’s home and office on May 10 as part of their investigation into who in the department leaked a police report on the death of Public Defender Jeff Adachi. The search has drawn rebukes from First Amendment groups and a growing number of city officials who have questioned whether police violated the law, including the state shield law that protects journalists from being compelled to rev

San Francisco ’s police chief , Bill Scott, sought to justify a controversial raid of a journalist ’ s home by saying police were investigating reporter Bryan Carmody as an “active participant” in a crime for leaking a police report about the death of Public Defender Jeff Adachi earlier this year. “We do believe that

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A battle between the press and police is playing out in politically liberal San Francisco after police raided a freelance reporter' s Still, San Francisco Police Chief William Scott said the journalist "crossed the line," motivated by profit or animosity toward the late public defender

San Francisco police chief apologizes for raid on journalist's home© Getty San Francisco police chief apologizes for raid on journalist's home

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott apologized Friday for a raid on a journalist's home, saying it was likely not legal while calling for an independent investigation.

Officers "should have done a better job," Scott told the San Fransisco Chronicle in an interview.

"I'm sorry that this happened. I'm sorry to the people of San Francisco. I'm sorry to the mayor. We have to fix it. We know there were some concerns in that investigation and we know we have to fix it," he added.

After raid, San Francisco reporter seeks return of property

After raid, San Francisco reporter seeks return of property A San Francisco reporter is demanding the return of property after police raided his home to find the source of a leaked report into the death of the city's public defender. 

Good morning. (Want to get California Today by email? Here’ s the sign-up.). In the days after San Francisco police officers barged into the home of a freelance journalist — with a sledgehammer and guns drawn — to investigate the source of a leaked police report, city leaders

Facing a firestorm of public criticism, San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott explains the controversial raid of Brian Carmody’ s home earlier this month. Carmody, a veteran journalist , has said he obtained the report from his source and sold a package of his reporting, which included the document

The police chief told the newspaper that he was "concerned" that warrants for the raid on freelance videographer Bryan Carmody's home and office did not sufficiently recognize him as a journalist.

Scott told the newspaper that an independent agency would conduct an internal affairs investigation, which could lead to officer discipline. He noted that police will not use evidence from the raid.

Police searched Carmody's home while investigating the leak of a report that contained unflattering information about Public Defender Jeff Adachi before his death.

Scott's apology is a reversal of his previous defense of the raid. He said Tuesday that police suspected Carmody conspired to steal a police report, which Carmody denied.

A week before that Scott said, "We went through the legal process and the appropriate legal process for a criminal investigation."

Scott's apology also follows much public pressure and condemnations from high-profile California politicians including Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D).

SF police got warrant to monitor journalist’s phone months before controversial raid.
San Francisco police obtained a warrant to search a freelance journalist’s phone records and were authorized to “conduct remote monitoring” on the phone more than two months before a controversial raid on his home and office, according to documents released Friday. Officers executed the warrant on Bryan Carmody’s phone records on March 1 — the first of seven search warrants obtained in the investigation into who leaked him a report on the Feb. 22 death of Public Defender Jeff Adachi.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 2
This is interesting!