•   
  •   
  •   

US‘Wow, what is that?’ Navy pilots report unexplained flying objects

07:06  27 may  2019
07:06  27 may  2019 Source:   bostonglobe.com

Sailors allegedly created 'rape list' of female crew members aboard Navy submarine

Sailors allegedly created 'rape list' of female crew members aboard Navy submarine A new probe reveals that Navy submarine sailors compiled a list of female crew members that ranked them according to their attractiveness level. 

Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and But the objects have gotten the attention of the Navy , which earlier this year sent out new classified guidance for how to report what the military calls

Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes but that they could reach 30,000 feet and “ Wow , what is that , man?” one exclaims. “Look at it fly !” No one in the Defense Department is saying that the objects were extraterrestrial, and experts

‘Wow, what is that?’ Navy pilots report unexplained flying objects© Adam Ferguson/The New York Times A US Navy pilot and a weapons system officer from the VFA-11 “Red Rippers” squadron after returning to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt in the Persian Gulf in 2015. The squadron began noticing strange objects just after the Navy upgraded the radar systems on its F/A-18 fighter planes.

WASHINGTON — The strange objects, one of them like a spinning top moving against the wind, appeared almost daily from the summer of 2014 to March 2015, high in the skies over the East coast. Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes but that they could reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.

Iranian lawmaker says his country doesn't want war with US

Iranian lawmaker says his country doesn't want war with US In remarks reported by semi-official ILNA news agency, a prominent, reformist Iranian lawmaker says in reference to Iran's allies in the Mideast that "no group can announce that it has entered a proxy war from Iran's side." 

Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds. At this point the pilots said they speculated that the objects were part of some classified and extremely advanced drone program.

Chilean Navy releases video of mysterious flying object - Продолжительность: 1:45 Fox News Recommended for you. UFO specialist: Time to take a closer look at reports from Navy pilots - Продолжительность: 3:28 CTV News Recommended for you.

“These things would be out there all day,” said Lieutenant Ryan Graves, an F/A-18 Super Hornet pilot who has been with the Navy for 10 years and who reported his sightings to the Pentagon and Congress. “Keeping an aircraft in the air requires a significant amount of energy. With the speeds we observed, 12 hours in the air is 11 hours longer than we’d expect.”

In late 2014, a Super Hornet pilot had a near collision with one of the objects, and an official mishap report was filed. Some of the incidents were captured on video, including one taken by a plane’s camera in early 2015 that shows an object zooming over the ocean waves as pilots question what they are watching.

Ethiopian crash might have been prevented if Boeing took us seriously, pilot union said

Ethiopian crash might have been prevented if Boeing took us seriously, pilot union said American Airline's pilots' union is calling Boeing's response to two fatal plane crashes "inexcusable," claiming the crashes might not have happened if the company had listened to pilots. Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for Allied Pilots Association — a union of American Airlines pilots — told CNN Business that Boeing had "a poisoned, diseased philosophy" for a global company. "Shame on you... we're going to call you out on it," Tajer said. Boeing did not comment on the union's position early Thursday morning.

Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects ". Ralph Blumenthal, an award-winning investigative reporter for the New York Times on the article " Wow , What Is That ?’

Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and “I almost hit one of those things,” the pilot told Lieutenant Graves. The pilot and his wingman were flying in tandem about 100 feet apart over the

“Wow, what is that, man?” one exclaims. “Look at it fly!”

No one in the Defense Department is saying that the objects were extraterrestrial, and experts emphasize that earthly explanations can generally be found for such incidents. Graves and four other Navy pilots, who said in interviews with The New York Times that they saw the objects in 2014 and 2015 in training maneuvers from Virginia to Florida off the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, make no assertions of their provenance. But the objects have gotten the attention of the Navy, which this year sent out new classified guidance for how to report what the military calls unexplained aerial phenomena, or unidentified flying objects.

Joseph Gradisher, a Navy spokesman, said the new guidance was an update of instructions that went out to the fleet in 2015, after the Roosevelt incidents.

“There were a number of different reports,” he said. Some cases could have been commercial drones, he said, but in other cases “we don’t know who’s doing this, we don’t have enough data to track this. So the intent of the message to the fleet is to provide updated guidance on reporting procedures for suspected intrusions into our airspace.”

Oakdale hoax: Police arrest father for falsely reporting Halloween candy with metal

Oakdale hoax: Police arrest father for falsely reporting Halloween candy with metal An Oakdale father was arrested this week after a police investigation into tainted Halloween candy proved that the father, now identified as Mathew Blackcloud, put metal into the candy himself. 

Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects . Nerdrotic Live. Повторите попытку позже. Прямой эфир: 28 мая 2019 г. A special report on the New York Times article that is, in my opinion, part of the "trickle" disclosure that will be happening over the next few years.

Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and But the objects have gotten the attention of the Navy , which earlier this year sent out new classified guidance for how to report what the military calls

The sightings were reported to the Pentagon’s shadowy, little-known Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which analyzed the radar data, video footage, and accounts provided by senior officers from the Roosevelt. Luis Elizondo, a military intelligence official who ran the program until he resigned in 2017, called the sightings “a striking series of incidents.”

The program, which began in 2007, was officially shut down in 2012 when the money dried up, according to the Pentagon. But the Navy recently said it investigates military reports of UFOs, and Elizondo and other participants say the program — parts of it remain classified — has continued in other forms. The program has also studied video that shows a whitish oval object described as a giant Tic Tac, about the size of a commercial plane, encountered by two Navy fighter jets off the coast of San Diego in 2004.

Leon Golub, a senior astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said the possibility of an extraterrestrial cause “is so unlikely that it competes with many other low-probability but more mundane explanations.” He added that “there are so many other possibilities — bugs in the code for the imaging and display systems, atmospheric effects and reflections, neurological overload from multiple inputs during high-speed flight.”

Coast Guard: F-15 pilots saw wayward jet crash into ocean

Coast Guard: F-15 pilots saw wayward jet crash into ocean It is believed the pilot was the only person aboard the Cessna Citation V when it crashed around 6 p.m. Friday according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Pilots of Florida Air National Guard F-15s that were sent to intercept the Citation watched it crash into the ocean, the Coast Guard said. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Records show the plane is registered to a limited liability corporation in Manalapan, a barrier island off Lantana. The aircraft left St.

Regulators to consider when Boeing 737 Max can return to the air. Boeing faces a crucial test this week as global regulators meet in Texas to determine when the grounded 737 Max aircraft will return to the air, after further revelations of problems with software used to train pilots to fly the aircraft.

The Real Story Behind the Myth of Area 51. There are no aliens at America's most famous top-secret military base, but what is there is just as interesting. In the middle of the barren Nevada desert, there's a dusty unmarked road that leads to the front gate of Area 51.

Graves still cannot explain what he saw. In the summer of 2014, he and Lieutenant Danny Accoin, another Super Hornet pilot, were part of a squadron, the VFA-11 “Red Rippers” out of Naval Air Station Oceana, Va., that was training for a deployment to the Persian Gulf.

Graves and Accoin spoke on the record to The Times about the objects. Three other pilots in the squadron also spoke to The Times about the objects but declined to be named.

The pilots began noticing the objects after their 1980s-era radar was upgraded to a more advanced system. As one fighter jet after another got the new radar, pilots began picking up the objects but ignoring what they thought were false radar tracks.

But Graves said the objects persisted, showing up at 30,000 feet, 20,000 feet, even sea level. Then pilots began seeing the objects.

What was strange, the pilots said, was that the video showed objects accelerating to hypersonic speed, making sudden stops and instantaneous turns — something beyond the physical limits of a human crew.

Asked what they thought the objects were, the pilots refused to speculate.

Read More

Australian navy pilots struck by lasers in South China Sea.
A witness says Australian navy helicopter pilots were hit by lasers while exercising in the South China Sea, forcing them to land as a precaution. Scholar Euan Graham, who was onboard the Royal Australian Navy flagship HMAS Canberra on a voyage from Vietnam to Singapore, said in an account of the incident that the lasers had been pointed from passing fishing vessels while the Canberra was being trailed by a Chinese warship. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 1
This is interesting!