US: Rain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight - PressFrom - US
  •   
  •   
  •   

USRain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight

01:40  17 june  2019
01:40  17 june  2019 Source:   msn.com

More rain could hit Louisiana after flooding turns deadly

More rain could hit Louisiana after flooding turns deadly A man drowned after his car stalled and sank on a flooded road . Many others were rescued. Baton Rouge rescue crews rushed into action Thursday morning, saving a woman who was trapped by the flash flooding. © Credit: CBSNews flooding2.jpg Forty miles west of Baton Rouge, parts of Henderson, Louisiana, are now submerged. If the water wasn't enough, the wind made it worse and multiple tornadoes were reported. One barreled through Baton Rouge flipping cars, toppling trees and shredding the roof off an apartment complex.

BUTLER TOWNSHIP -- The warm weather is affecting everyone these days especially farmers , some of them barely able to find enough water to water their

The intense rain has seen drought-ravaged properties, farmers and cattle isolated by rising She applauded efforts by groups including AgForce and Rural Aid , which have been working to get The rain has been enough to interrupt stock routes and leave farmers without enough feed to stop their

Rain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight© Provided by The Associated Press In this Monday, June 10, 2019 photo, Andrew Dunham harvests Hakurei turnips on his 80-acre organic farm, in Grinnell, Iowa. Like farmers throughout the Midwest, torrential spring rains turned Dunham's land into sticky muck that wouldn't let him plant crops this spring. But unlike other farmers, Dunham won't get a piece of a $16 billion aid package to offset his losses, and he can't fall back on federally subsidized crop insurance because Dunham grows herbs, flowers and dozens of vegetable varieties but not the region's dominant crops of corn and soybeans. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Like farmers throughout the Midwest, this spring's torrential rains turned Andrew Dunham's land into sticky muck that set him back nearly a month in planting his crops.

Capsized lifeboat leaves three dead in French storm

Capsized lifeboat leaves three dead in French storm Three rescuers from the French lifeboat service died Friday when their vessel capsized in rough seas caused by a giant storm pummelling the country's Atlantic. 

The Australian government has announced an aid package of millions for farmers struggling amid a prolonged dry spell. Meteorologists say the already devastating drought could worsen further in the coming months.

How to help Australian farmers struggling with drought conditions. AUSSIES are helping to buy food and other necessities for farmers struggling to feed their Meanwhile, the Today show will broadcast its Farm Aid Telethon on Monday, August 20 from 5.30am to raise money for drought-affected farmers .

Unlike other farmers, though, Dunham won't get a piece of a $16 billion aid package to offset his losses and he can't fall back on federally subsidized crop insurance because he grows herbs, flowers and dozens of vegetable varieties, but not the region's dominant crops of corn and soybeans.

"There are no federal bailouts for vegetable farmers," said Dunham, who owns an 80-acre (32-hectare) organic farm with his wife near Grinnell, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) east of Des Moines, and is enduring weeks without sales as his crops ripen. "We'll just miss out on three weeks of income."

Rain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight© Provided by The Associated Press In this Monday, June 10, 2019 photo, Hakurei turnips sit in a field after being harvested on Andrew Dunham's 80-acre organic farm, in Grinnell, Iowa. Like farmers throughout the Midwest, torrential spring rains turned Dunham's land into sticky muck that wouldn't let him plant crops this spring. But unlike other farmers, Dunham won't get a piece of a $16 billion aid package to offset his losses, and he can't fall back on federally subsidized crop insurance because Dunham grows herbs, flowers and dozens of vegetable varieties but not the region's dominant crops of corn and soybeans. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Although the lack of federal safety net programs for farmers who grow everything from arugula to zucchini isn't new, one of the wettest springs in U.S. history has focused attention on the special status of so-called commodity crops, primarily corn, soybeans, cotton, rice and wheat. Growers of some of those crops received $11 billion in special aid last year and will get $16 billion more this year to offset losses caused by trade disputes that led to tariffs and resulting drops in demand.

Tennis-Djokovic v Thiem French semi-final called off in rain

Tennis-Djokovic v Thiem French semi-final called off in rain The men's French Open semi-final clash between world number one Novak Djokovic and Dominic Thiem was called off for the day because of bad weather, organisers said on Friday. Thiem was leading 6-2 3-6 3-1 when rain stopped play for the second time at 1740 local time (1540GMT). Organisers said that ticket holders for that match would be refunded. It was not yet known when the match would be re-scheduled or whether it would have an impact on the final, which is scheduled for Sunday. Rafa Nadal, the 11-times champion, beat Roger Federer in straight sets in the first semi-final.

Close your eyes and listen to this relaxing gentle rain falling on leaves on a forest road in autumn. This video has high definition binaural audio

It could take months for Haitian farmers to recover as heavy rains brought by Hurricane Irma have flooded parts of the impoverished Caribbean nation Haiti did not take a direct hit from Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes on record, but it unleashed rains that washed away fields of rice

Rain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight© Provided by The Associated Press In this Monday, June 10, 2019 photo, Andrew Dunham harvests Hakurei turnips on his 80-acre organic farm, in Grinnell, Iowa. Like farmers throughout the Midwest, torrential spring rains turned Dunham's land into sticky muck that wouldn't let him plant crops this spring. But unlike other farmers, Dunham won't get a piece of a $16 billion aid package to offset his losses, and he can't fall back on federally subsidized crop insurance because Dunham grows herbs, flowers and dozens of vegetable varieties but not the region's dominant crops of corn and soybeans. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Federal support, including subsidized insurance and other protections against losses, is a long-standing tradition for growers of the major crops, who nevertheless are struggling to stay in business because of the tariffs, years of low prices and poor weather. The wet spring has also put growers of specialty crops in a tight spot, as they scramble to seed their fields and kill weeds that grew unhindered until recently.

Rain postpones Monster Energy Series race at Michigan

Rain postpones Monster Energy Series race at Michigan Persistent rain forced the postponement of Sunday’s Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race to a Monday start at Michigan International Speedway. 

A terribly wet summer in the UK has left farmers facing the worst harvest in 40 years and the task of adapting to new conditions.

BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - It could take months for Haitian farmers to recover as heavy rains brought by Hurricane Irma have flooded parts of Haiti did not take a direct hit from Irma, one of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes on record, but it unleashed rains that washed away fields of rice

The persistent rain has been especially worrisome for farmers in central Illinois who grow most of the nation's pumpkins and the processors who turn the squash into pie filling for the nation's Thanksgiving feasts.

"We had rain and rain and rain," said Mohammad Babadoost, a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who closely follows the state's pumpkin crop. "They're planting from dawn to dusk and even during the night to catch up because they're about three weeks behind."

Pumpkin seeds usually are planted in April or May, but Jim Ackerman, agriculture manager for Libby's, the largest producer of pumpkin filling, said that if warm weather settles in over June and July, the crop should ripen in time to meet demand and prevent shortages. A cool, wet summer could cause problems, he said, but at least the seeds are in the ground.

"We've very happy to get things planted," he said. "Everybody is a little relieved."

Fans shrug off rain to honor Stanley Cup champion Blues

Fans shrug off rain to honor Stanley Cup champion Blues ST. LOUIS (AP) Large crowds are gathering in downtown St. Louis despite heavy rain, awaiting a parade and rally to honor the Stanley Cup champion St. Louis Blues. The Blues beat the Boston Bruins 4-1 Wednesday in Game 7 to win their first championship. The Blues joined the NHL as an expansion team in 1967 and made it to the Stanley Cup Final in each of the team's first three seasons, without winning a game. The team hadn't been back until this year. Fans began lining the streets hours before the parade, despite the rain. The parade will travel down Market Street to the Gateway Arch for a rally. The last time St.

New Delhi: With unseasonal rains wreaking havoc on crops ahead of harvest season, and no relief in sight , beleaguered farmers are contemplating selling off their land - or suicide. The north and eastern parts of the country have been hit by heavy unseasonal rains or hailstorm over the last two weeks.

Dairy farms struggle in changing milk market. Instead, with no new buyer on the horizon, the Coombs are culling their cows. Since the arrival of the Dean Foods letter in March, they've sold more than half the herd to other dairies or to meat processors.

Although corn is the nation's biggest crop, nearly all of it is so-called field corn that is used for animal feed, ethanol production and as seed for future crops. Only about 1% is sweet corn, which is grown for human consumption.

For Scott Alsum, whose family owns Alsum Sweetcorn in central Wisconsin, rain made it nearly impossible to plant on schedule in mid-April. They planted some seeds between storms but they won't know if it will be enough to meet the demand for corn sold at seven roadside stands, some farmers markets and to wholesalers.

"I don't know if I'll have enough corn to keep me going every day of the week or not," Alsum said. "It's going to depend on the weather. Right now it's a little sketchy looking."

In northeastern Iowa, Daquan Campbell, market manager for the Waterloo Urban Farmers Market, said many area farmers are in a similar situation and it has kept about a third of fresh produce growers from selling produce. The market still has plenty of baked goods and crafts, but customers shouldn't expect to find asparagus or spring onions, which typically would be available this time of year.

"Customers are probably expecting a little bit more," Campbell said. "We've been trying to educate them about the farmers and how the weather is dictating what's available right now."

Weather woes cause American corn farmers to throw in the towel

Weather woes cause American corn farmers to throw in the towel In the nation’s 18 major corn-producing states, there has been one refrain for the past few weeks: To plant or not to plant? There comes a point of no return, where the cost of planting outweighs potential remuneration, where yields dwindle and there just may not be enough days for plants to mature before a hard frost. For many American corn farmers, that point is now. On Monday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that domestic plantings were at 92 percent of farmers’ total intended acreage, the slowest pace in more than 40 years.

Farmers have been pushing the state's Agriculture Department to change the formula, pointing to the many dairy farms that are barely breaking even, have With most California pastures crackled dry, the government lessened the grazing requirement to 90 days, but farmers are still struggling to meet that.

DW visited with farmers struggling to cope. Joe Aistrup, a professor at Kansas State University, said the current situation leaves farmers high and dry "both in terms of the weather and in terms of relief Farmers like Dale Mauch in Colorado have little choice but to hunker down and pray for rain .

In Minnesota, apple growers were more concerned about the cold temperatures than the persistent rain, said Ross Nelson, who owns Nelson's Apple Farm, about 40 miles (64 kilometers) south of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Nelson said trees in his orchard bloomed about a week late, setting back his crop just a bit, but that growers in other parts of the state have had trouble with Honeycrisp and Haralson varieties.

Nelson, who has been growing apples since 1974, said he's glad federal programs help growers of commodity crops and that he has never minded that he doesn't benefit from such support.

"We know we're pretty independent of the government and we're not looking for government assistance," he said.

Why the difference between crops?

Chad Hart, an Iowa State University economist, said the reason giant crops such as corn and soybeans have been treated differently is because they're so important to the national economy. There isn't a replacement for such crops and a shortage would be painful, particularly to the livestock industry.

"There are only so many things you can feed to our livestock and keep the meat production going," he said.

___

Follow Scott McFetridge on Twitter: https://twitter.com/smcfetridge

This robot ‘duck’ could help Japanese rice farmers keep paddy fields clear of weeds.
Robot duck, doo doo doo doo doo doo

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 3
This is interesting!