US: U.S. judge to rule on Dakota Access Pipeline easement in early March - PressFrom - US
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US U.S. judge to rule on Dakota Access Pipeline easement in early March

22:41  28 february  2017
22:41  28 february  2017 Source:   reuters.com

Deadline to leave pipeline protest camp won't be extended

  Deadline to leave pipeline protest camp won't be extended The Army Corps of Engineers said it won't extend a Wednesday deadline for Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents to vacate their encampment on federal land in North Dakota. The camp has existed since August and at times has housed thousands of people who supported the concerns of Sioux nations that the $3.8 billion pipeline to carry North Dakota oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois threatens the environment and sacred sites. Dallas-based developer Energy Transfer Partners disputes those claims.With flooding expected this spring, the Corps on Feb.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U . S . judge said on Tuesday he hopes to decide by about March 7 on a request by Native American tribes for the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw an easement on religious grounds for the final link of the Dakota Access Pipeline .

(Reuters) - A U . S . judge said on Tuesday he hopes to decide by about March 7 on a request by Native American tribes for the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw an easement on religious grounds for the final link of the Dakota Access Pipeline . At a hearing Judge James Boasberg of the U . S . Court in

A man stands next to homemade shields in Sacred Stone camp, one of the few remaining camps protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 24, 2017. © REUTERS/Stephen Yang A man stands next to homemade shields in Sacred Stone camp, one of the few remaining camps protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 24, 2017. A U.S. judge said on Tuesday he hopes to decide by about March 7 on a request by Native American tribes for the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw an easement on religious grounds for the final link of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

At a hearing Judge James Boasberg of the U.S. Court in Washington, D.C., said he hoped to provide a written ruling by that time on the injunction requested by the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes regarding the final section of the line to go under a lake in North Dakota.

Deadline extension to leave Dakota Access oil pipeline protest camp not granted

  Deadline extension to leave Dakota Access oil pipeline protest camp not granted BISMARCK, N.D. — The Army Corps of Engineers said it won't extend a Wednesday deadline for Dakota Access oil pipeline opponents to vacate their encampment on federal land in North Dakota. The camp has existed since August and at times has housed thousands of people who supported the concerns of Sioux nations that the $3.8 billion pipeline to carry North Dakota oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois threatens the environment and sacred sites. Dallas-based developer Energy Transfer Partners disputes those claims.

A U . S . judge said on Tuesday he hopes to decide by about March 7 on a request by Native American tribes for the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw an easement on religious grounds for the final link of the Dakota Access Pipeline .

A U . S . judge said on Tuesday he hopes to decide by about March 7 on a request by Native American tribes for the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw an easement on religious grounds for the final link of the Dakota Access Pipeline . At a hearing Judge James Boasberg of the U . S . Court in Washington.

Boasberg said if Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the $3.8 billion line, expects the project will be completed and oil will flow before March 7, that the company must give him 48 hours notice so he can release his ruling.

The tribes, who have rights to water access in the area, say that the oil pipeline would spiritually degrade river and lake water and harm religious practices even if it does not spill.

Their legal options to stop the pipeline are dwindling.

Earlier this month, Boasberg denied a request by the tribes for a temporary restraining order to halt construction of the project.

Boasberg on Tuesday questioned how the water could be harmed since the pipeline is being built under the Lake Oahe and oil would not likely touch the water in the event of a spill.

Nicole Ducheneaux, a lawyer for the tribes, said at the hearing that the pipeline would spiritually degrade the water on the Missouri River because of its presence and that would prevent tribes from carrying out ceremonies because other nearby water sources had been contaminated from decades of mining.

(Reporting by Timothy Gardner; Editing by James Dalgleish)

Judge to hear arguments on Dakota Access oil pipeline work .
A federal judge will hear arguments Tuesday about whether to stop the final bit of construction on the disputed Dakota Access pipeline, perhaps just days before it could start moving oil.U.S. District Judge James Boasberg in Washington, D.C., will consider a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes to order the Army Corps of Engineers to withdraw permission for developer Energy Transfer Partners to lay pipe under Lake Oahe in North Dakota. The stretch under the Missouri River reservoir is the last piece of construction for the $3.8 billion pipeline that's to move oil through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

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