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USWhy LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake

08:55  05 july  2019
08:55  05 july  2019 Source:   latimes.com

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An early warning system can be implemented as a chain of information communication systems and comprises sensors, event detection and decision USGS Seismologist Robert Graves and Dr. Lucy Jones speak at a press conference in response to the 6 . 4 magnitude earthquake that struck near

It didn ’ t send an alert for the July 4th quake . Los Angeles will lower the level at which earthquake warnings get sent to residents, city officials said after a 6 . 4 magnitude quake on Thursday morning That information allows officials to warn people in potential danger zones before the most damaging

Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake

LOS ANGELES — Did Los Angeles’ ShakeAlertLA smartphone app fail to provide an earthquake early warning?

California earthquake: Searles Valley quake generates over 100 aftershocks

California earthquake: Searles Valley quake generates over 100 aftershocks The strongest earthquake to hit Southern California in nearly 20 years has prompted one city to declare a state of emergency Thursday, and shook residents from Las Vegas to Orange County. The quake, with a magnitude of 6.4, was centered near Ridgecrest, a community west of the Mojave Desert and about 150 miles north of Los Angeles. At least 159 aftershocks of magnitude 2.5 or greater were recorded after the earthquake, according to USGS Seismologist Robert Graves. It is a higher than normal number, but not unprecedented, he said. The largest of them were magnitude 4.6.

LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- The ShakeAlertLA app is an earthquake early warning system that detects significant earthquake activity and is He explained why scientists at Caltech received a warning but not the public. The first threshold is a magnitude 5 or greater in L . A . County; it will send out an alert .

People in Los Angeles who had downloaded an earthquake alert app were startled yesterday when the Even a few seconds’ warning can let people take cover or stop what they’re doing before the The stations quickly calculate the magnitude of the quake and estimate the intensity of the shaking in So the ShakeAlert LA app is designed to only send an alert if the magnitude is above 5 and the

Los Angeles residents were asking that question after Thursday’s earthquake that was felt through Southern California, when they didn’t get an early warning from the much-anticipated ShakeAlertLA app, released by the city of Los Angeles earlier this year.

Did it fail? Not quite. The ShakeAlertLA app was only designed to alert users of cellphones physically located in Los Angeles County if there was at least “light shaking,” or level 4 on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, expected for Los Angeles County.

What was actually felt Thursday in Los Angeles County, while seemingly scary, was actually not that bad — either level 2 or level 3 shaking, or “weak shaking.”

Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake
Why LA's early warning system didn't send an alert before the 6.4 magnitude quake

Slideshow by photo services

‘Your house is gone.’ Ridgecrest residents survey damage after powerful earthquake jolts Southern California

‘Your house is gone.’ Ridgecrest residents survey damage after powerful earthquake jolts Southern California Bill Sturgeon sat alone at his kitchen table on Friday surveying the damage unleashed on his longtime home in Ridgecrest a day earlier by the largest earthquake to strike the region in years. require(["medianetNativeAdOnArticle"], function (medianetNativeAdOnArticle) { medianetNativeAdOnArticle.getMedianetNativeAds(true); }); Beads of sweat ran down his face as he pointed to a pile of shattered glass and broken planks of wood that lay on the warped floor, wreckage from the magnitude 6.

LOS ANGELES -- The ShakeAlertLA app is an earthquake early warning system that detects significant earthquake activity and is supposed to alert Robert Graves, with the USGS, said the the early warning system actually worked as designed. He explained why scientists at Caltech received

California’ s nascent earthquake early - warning system had another successful run Tuesday night when a 4. 4 magnitude temblor hit the La Verne area. Seismologist Lucy Jones told reporters at Caltech on Tuesday night that the system sent out a warning three seconds before the shaking began.

“It didn’t meet the threshold for the L.A. area,” said Doug Given, the U.S. Geological Survey’s earthquake early warning coordinator. “ShakeAlertLA is not designed to detect earthquakes that far away,” said California Institute of Technology seismologist Egill Hauksson.

ShakeAlertLA is a mobile phone app developed by the city that transmits earthquake early warnings based off a separate, but similarly named, system called ShakeAlert and run by the U.S. Geological Survey.

The USGS’ system relies on hundreds of earthquake sensors scattered throughout the West Coast. There is no public smartphone app yet available that sends earthquake early warnings throughout all of California.

However, scientists are continuing to test, refine and perfect the USGS’ ShakeAlert system that does aim to provide earthquake early warnings throughout California, and eventually Oregon and Washington.

That ShakeAlert system worked — it’s just that the public does not yet have access to that information as scientists continue to refine its public delivery system. The USGS’ ShakeAlert system issued an alert about 6.9 seconds after the shaking began, Given said.

Had there been a public warning system in place for Kern County, the USGS ShakeAlert system would not have been fast enough to issue an early warning for Ridgecrest — at 10 miles away from the epicenter too close to get a warning, but enough to give some warning to California City, about 50 miles southwest of the epicenter.

The intensity of shaking was obviously worse closer to the epicenter, maxing out at intensity level 7, or very strong shaking, but that occurred in a much more remote area.

The city of Ridgecrest, population 29,000, endured intensity level 6 or “very strong” shaking, in which damage that might occur could result in broken chimneys, considerable damage in poorly built or badly designed buildings, but negligible damage in buildings of good design and construction.

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The two major earthquakes that hit Southern California should alert people across the nation of the need to be prepared for natural disasters, the state's governor said as officials expressed relief that the damages weren't worse. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Saturday that governments must strengthen alert systems and building codes, and residents should make sure they know how to protect themselves during an earthquake.

usr: 3
This is interesting!